Anyone Else Experience Mobbing? - page 7

Hi~ I have been at my new job for over a year now and have become the victim of mobbing by my peers in the ICU where I work. I have tried every approach with this but nothing has helped my... Read More

  1. by   WeakAnkles
    there have recently been studies done on mobbing in the workplace. i suggest interested persons google the topic and read up/educate themselves.

    i have found this myself, and other material i have read supports it:

    who mobs
    "the literature is particularly critical of the perpetrators of mobbing. according to namie and namie (2000) those who instigate mobbing tend to be bullies, who try to dominate people in nearly every encounter. they are described as “inadequate, defective, and poorly developed people” (namie and namie, 2000, p. 14). they tend to be unpredictable, angry, critical, jealous, and manipulative (davenport, schwartz and elliot, 1999; namie and namie 2000). finally,glass (1999) describes them as representing “everything bad” (p. 239).
    targets of mobbing
    an individual can be mobbed regardless of age, race, religion, gender, or rank within an organization (davenport, schwartz and elliot, 1999; namie and namie 2000; leymann, n.d.). though any person is susceptible to being mobbed, those individuals who are devoted, loyal, creative, organized, cooperative and experienced professionals, seem to be at a higher likelihood to experience mobbing (davenport, schwartz and elliot, 1999).
    it is suggested that particularly creative individuals may often be subjected to mobbing because they promote new ideas which may challenge others (davenport, schwartz and elliot, 1999). mobbing may begin out of jealousy over the superior competence of the target, envy over the targets social skills or envy regarding the positive attitude of the target that attracts colleagues to them (namie and namie, 2000). at times mobbing is done as a bully revels in animosity, gaining pleasure from the excitement that it creates, giving the bully what westhues (2002) calls “the euphoria of collective attack”.
    why do targets endure
    it may be questioned why a person would stay in a job in which she/he is being mobbed. mobbing victims often stay because they love their work (davenport, schwartz and elliot, 1999). they feel a sense of identity, competence, and commitment to what they do.
    it is perhaps the targets commitment to the job that leaves him/her ill prepared for the mobbing experience. targets dedicated to their work may rely on their superior efforts to move ahead and gain recognition, in lieu of tracking the politics of the job. targets tend to be empathic, just, and fair people (namie & namie 2000: auerbach, 2001), who naively believe if they don’t fight back against mobbing and continue to excel in their work, the perpetrator will lose interest and stop or that others will recognize the work they do and disbelieve the rumors and lies being told. this lack of knowledge about mobbing leaves the target little time to build the necessary survival networks to combat the problem (davenport, schwartz and elliot, 1999)."



    i will say this for myself, i am a strong person. i have fought the good fight for over a year. but, you can not beat the mob, or ignore them either. i wish i knew what "the survival networks" mentioned above were because i have found none.

    do not let my "weakankles" sign-on id fool you. the only thing weak about me is my ankles, and my back.
    Last edit by WeakAnkles on Nov 18, '07
  2. by   WeakAnkles
    i forgot these from the quotes:

    references
    auerbach, j. e. (2001). personal and executive coaching: the complete guide for mental health professionals. ventura, ca: executive college press.
    davenport, n., schwartz, r. d., and elliot, g. p. (1999). mobbing: emotional abuse in the american workplace. ames, ia: civil society publishing.
    glass, l. (1999). the complete idiot’s guide to verbal self-defense. new york, ny: alpha books.
    leymann, h. (n. d.) the mobbing encyclopedia: bullying; whistleblowing. retrieved july 28, 2005, from http://www.leymann.se/english/frame.html.
    namie, g, and namie, r. (2000). the bully at work. naperville, il: sourcebooks inc.
    westhues, k. (2002). at the mercy of the mob: a summary of research on workplace mobbing [electronic version]. canada’s occupational health and safety magazine, 18, 30-36.
  3. by   Cattitude
    Quote from Armygirl7
    AllNurses has 246,141 members.
    I'd love to hear from some of the Nurses who engage in this behavior.

    This is so prevalent, out of 241k people on this forum SOMEONE must have been a bully or been part of the MOB.

    Why would you ever do this to a co-worker?
    What did you get out of it?
    How could you be stopped?
    I see no one has responded to your question. Why am I not surprised?
    Not ONE nurse on this forum can step up and admit to bullying?

    It would have been interesting to hear from the "other side".
    I want to know exactly what the bully wants to accomplish.
    What is the end result?
  4. by   TiredMD
    Quote from Cattitude
    It would have been interesting to hear from the "other side".
    I want to know exactly what the bully wants to accomplish.
    What is the end result?
    I'm not a nurse, but in medicine we "mob" each other regularly, mainly medical students and residents. It's our culture. The most severe instances are usually because of a general feeling that the person is incompetent, and patients would be better off if the person would quit. I had assumed that this was the same in nursing?
  5. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from teeituptom
    Actually Im fairly tough also. believe it or not. But really a lot of that biting goes around me to elsewhere. And I agree there are a lot of coworkers who really dont want to cross my path outside in real life.

    But I no longer defend the weak. By defending the weak you are doing them a disservice. You always defend them, how will they grow and learn to defend themselves.
    I agree with this somewhat...I just have too much of the maternal in me to let it slide.
  6. by   Mulan
    Quote from TiredMD
    I'm not a nurse, but in medicine we "mob" each other regularly, mainly medical students and residents. It's our culture. The most severe instances are usually because of a general feeling that the person is incompetent, and patients would be better off if the person would quit. I had assumed that this was the same in nursing?

    No, in nursing it's more likely that they don't like someone for some reason, maybe they just don't like the color of their eyes.
  7. by   Chaya
    In these situations I have initially blamed my personal weaknesses for allowing co-workers to treat me this way-until I have seen them mobbing others as well. Then I get angry, realizing that it is NOT me, but the mobbers" who are in the wrong.
    I acknowledge that a strong individual can overcome "mobbing" directed against them. Kudos to those with that kind of inner reserve who are capable of "gutting it out"; I am envious because I am not cut from that cloth. But I tend to look beyond and wonder what it is in a given work environment that allows and even fosters this kind of behavior in the first place. More importantly, how can this type of environment be changed, or prevented from developing in the first place.
  8. by   Chaya
    Quote from WeakAnkles

    I will say this for myself, I AM a strong person. I have fought the good fight for over a year. But, you can not beat the mob, or ignore them either. I wish I knew what "the survival networks" mentioned above were because I have found none.

    Do not let my "Weakankles" sign-on ID fool you. The only thing weak about me is my ankles, and my back.
    One technique I read about was being promoted as a solution to kids being bullied in schools. It was recommended that witnesses to a bullying episode gather round the victem in support as a show of strength against the bully or bullies and a message to the perpetrators that their behavior was being witnessed and not ignored.
    I haven't read any follow-up info and don't know if this is something that has been used in reality or if so, if it has proven effective.
  9. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from Mulan
    No, in nursing it's more likely that they don't like someone for some reason, maybe they just don't like the color of their eyes.
    Or they are "too good" at their job, and someone is jealous..I've seen very smart, competent nurses basically run out of a place because they made some of the other ones look bad. Nurses can be territorial. Although, I agree with what the other poster said too-I've seen residents and med students get tortured in the OR because the attending surgeon has a hair across his butt for whatever reason(he's going to miss his golf/tennis/racquetball game, his wife is mad at him, his mistress is mad at him etc). It's not always the incompentent ones in that case either. I think all of healthcare is full of maladjusted people because the culture condoned it for a long time. It is changeable, though.
  10. by   GadgetRN71
    Quote from Chaya
    One technique I read about was being promoted as a solution to kids being bullied in schools. It was recommended that witnesses to a bullying episode gather round the victem in support as a show of strength against the bully or bullies and a message to the perpetrators that their behavior was being witnessed and not ignored.
    I haven't read any follow-up info and don't know if this is something that has been used in reality or if so, if it has proven effective.
    A doctor had a go at me a few weeks ago, and 2 of my fellow nurses(male) were standing in back of me should I need them. Ha, it was pretty sweet in retrospect-like they were my protectors. Didn't end up needing them, I handled the situation. But it was good to know they were there!
  11. by   ebear
    TiredMD,
    No, I don't believe that it's the same in nursing; often, quite the opposite is true. New people may have many more years experience and with higher credentials than their co-workers. The others nurses may feel threatened by this fact. In my case, once my former co-workers found that I had over 25 yrs. O.R. experience and had been certified in O.R. nursing for 20 of those 25 yrs., the mobbing started. I had only been at the facility for 3 weeks. They knew they could not shoot me a line of BS regarding O.R. standards and procedures, I suppose, so they made my life hell!
  12. by   IMustBeCrazy
    Quote from teeituptom
    Actually Im fairly tough also. believe it or not. But really a lot of that biting goes around me to elsewhere. And I agree there are a lot of coworkers who really dont want to cross my path outside in real life.

    But I no longer defend the weak. By defending the weak you are doing them a disservice. You always defend them, how will they grow and learn to defend themselves.
    I am quite good at defending myself and I also can easily leave work at work. But I expect those that are wizened and experienced to show good leadership and be a good example by stepping in when things get ridiculous and simply say "no". That is the definition of being a well-functioning team. There is no "I" in team.

    The easy way out is to do nothing. That coworker is obviously already overwhelmed, what does that teach that person about integrity and backing their coworkers in the future? Some may say doing nothing is therapeutic or teaches a lesson, I say it's BS and cowardly.

    The fastest way for evil to prevail is for good people to do NOTHING.
  13. by   CHATSDALE
    first job after nursing graduation [second career] i was like 10 years older than the experienced nurses..there were two on the evening shift an rn and a lpn who were good friends and bullies from their first breath
    they prided themselves on whom they could make quit or react to their tauts
    i survived with less injuries because one of the rns gave up and quit and another lpn requested a transfer to another floor
    after that the head nurse could see that she was losing too many people d/t the games these two were playing
    finally ones husband got transferred and the other quit when she looked around and she was all alone
    if you see this going on, give some support to one being bullied..invite them into conversations, give assistance, ACCEPT ASSISTANCE, sometimes we can do things better alone but part of our jobs is to create nurses
    Last edit by CHATSDALE on Nov 18, '07 : Reason: error

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