Anyone Else Experience Mobbing? - page 2

Hi~ I have been at my new job for over a year now and have become the victim of mobbing by my peers in the ICU where I work. I have tried every approach with this but nothing has helped my... Read More

  1. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Yes- I experienced "mobbing" as a traveler in a very disfunctional unit. I later learned that the nurse there before me was physically assaulted by two techs (the nurse himself told me). He was brought over from India by the company. The day his two-year contract was up he left and never went back. He wanted to leave earlier, but would have had to pay $10,000. per signed contract with the company.

    Also, I ran into the former social worker at another facility. She told me she was "mobbed" and that nothing was done about it. The unit manager even physically assaulted her on the unit, in front of pts and nothing was done. She moved out of the area.

    I broke my contract and got the heck out of Dodge. When you are being mobbed, there's nothing you can do except leave.
  2. by   EmmaG
    Quote from WeakAnkles
    There is another side to me that feels we should really create an awareness about this too. Bring it into the light. Until we can identify it readily as it occurs, we have no chances of stopping this from happening to others after I leave. It is an insidious poison.

    Let's talk about this so others may learn.
    I think those who've experienced it are more than aware of the problem. Like stevie said, you're not going to change them. Don't allow it to happen, leave and be sure to express why you're leaving in your exit interview with HR.
  3. by   I love my cat!
    This is a very serious issue and I personally find it very disturbing. In my opinion, you need to report this through Employee Health before you quit. I know a lot of people may find this extreme or silly, but you really need to explain what has been happening, how long, how often and the health problems that have resulted from this hostile environment (depression, anxiety, sleep problems, appetite, etc...).
    You need to have this documented.
    Bullying and mobbing can result in serious physical and psychological problems.....problems that don't always miraculously resolve when you just 'leave' the work environment. If for some reason you are fired, you will have the appropriate documentation on file and will have an excellent chance of being covered through Workman's Compensation.
    I have a Cousin who is a Psychiatrist. She sees her share of patients that are there because of workplace bullying/mobbing. She also told me that a very high percentage of them are Nurses! The vast majority are being covered by Workman's Compensation. She told me that 95% of these people would not even need counseling had it not been for their toxic work environment.
    It's such a shame.
  4. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from WeakAnkles
    There is another side to me that feels we should really create an awareness about this too. Bring it into the light. Until we can identify it readily as it occurs, we have no chances of stopping this from happening to others after I leave. It is an insidious poison.

    Let's talk about this so others may learn.
    whether it's called mobbing, lateral/horizontal violence, nurses eating their young/ea other, it is something that keeps nursing down, and is a chronic problem.

    what seems to be a simple resolution to me, is not so easy for others.
    we nurses are comprised of very unique personalities, so there is no one solution.
    even if we could think of the answers, it would require the support of.....administration.
    as long as healthcare aspires to $$-making potential, that will always take precedence to the emotional/mental well-being of its employees.
    it's every man for himself, in this field.
    one truly needs to have a gut of steel, for many different reasons.
    be well.
    and please, do not ever allow anyone to treat you like a doormat.
    you are worthy of so much more.

    leslie
  5. by   KJB_65
    Please get out now. No job is ever worth your mental or physical well being. I have never been on the receiving end but have seen it done and did not condone it. I actually left the place where It happened. The nurse that was going through it was not supported by management. She was a great nurse. Not part of "the group" but a fabulous nurse. It was a horrible thing to witness. Good luck to you.
  6. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from WeakAnkles
    Hi~

    I have been at my new job for over a year now and have become the victim of mobbing by my peers in the ICU where I work.

    I have tried every approach with this but nothing has helped my situation. I am going to have to leave this job for it to end.

    It has caused me to become depressed, anxious at times, and I have gained weight.

    I have also seen mobbing occur at other units where I have worked. I am wondering how prevalent this is now among nurses.
    I did experience this on a shift in a unit in which I worked. It's very upseting. I ended up choosing to leave that unit.
  7. by   ebear
    It happened to me too several years ago. I was in orientation (O.R.) at a new hospital for 3 weeks. It was a rural hospital and apparently the nurses there felt extremely threatened by a "city" nurse. They made my life a living hell! I turned in my ID badge at lunchtime one day and walked out. I later found out that this happens all the time for any newcomers at that facility. I still cringe if I have to drive by the place!! HR sent me an exit interview to fill out--boy, did I FILL IT OUT! I understand that this issue can be addressed by an attorney these days. I was just too whipped to pursue it.
    ebear
    Last edit by ebear on Nov 12, '07
  8. by   UM Review RN
    One place I worked started out great and then turned toxic after a couple of years. I got out, but Love My Cat is so right -- it does do some damage to your psyche and it takes time and patience to repair.

    Luckily, I happened to move to a place where there were other "refugees" from the toxic place and they've been very understanding and supportive.

    We wish you all the success possible, and hope that your next move is the best one. I think it might help to get some counseling as well. Having an objective point of view and tips and suggestions for remedial action will certainly help you recover faster.

    Let us know how it goes, ok?
    Last edit by UM Review RN on Nov 12, '07
  9. by   RN1989
    Been there, done that too. You aren't the only one. There are so many articles out there about it but it seems to be just another one of those nursing issues where everyone sees it but no one has a definitive solution for it. Whether I experienced it or watched from the outside, every time the mob has won and the nurse (me and others) were forced to quit. Management always sides with the mob or they wouldn't have a unit left to staff with. Go find another job you can tolerate and do not let your job define who you are!
  10. by   ebear
    Oh, yeah! I spoke to the DON on my way out. She said "That dept. has run off so many excellent nurses!" I said "Then WHY do you allow it?" She just shrugged her shoulders. I guess she figured that they would gang up on her next, if she confronted them. My next co-workers howled when I told them about the place. They had heard about it from 50 miles away! :angryfire
  11. by   Chaya
    Quote from WeakAnkles
    There is another side to me that feels we should really create an awareness about this too. Bring it into the light. Until we can identify it readily as it occurs, we have no chances of stopping this from happening to others after I leave. It is an insidious poison.

    Let's talk about this so others may learn.
    I was in a similar situation many years ago (in healthcare but not in nursing). I was totally demoralized; the only thing that prevented me from leaving was I was sure I couldn't get a good recommendation from anyone. When I realized that I was not the only one feeling pushed out I began to feel angry instead of depressed. I very seldom speak out but was feeling like I had nothing to lose; I don't remember what led directly to the moment but we were all at a general meeting and I impulsively said something to the effect that "the people dynamic here is really destructive". Somehow that did bring it all into the light. A number of my co-workers came up to me to thank me for speaking out. Turns out the cliquey atmosphere was being generated by only one or two individuals and was actually in part an informal and misguided effort at team-building that made many of my co-workers uneasy. Sharing this awareness publicly was actually the beginning of turning the situation around and in this case had a healing effect and led to a much more friendly and accepting unit as a whole. I don't know if this would have happened if I had planned to speak out when I did-but I do know it can happen. Sometimes the good guys CAN win!
  12. by   CaLLaCoDe
    Hazing/Mobbing gives me the willies. I am so grateful for not having been hazed/mobbed. Some tweaking, yes but never mobbed/hazed. Professionalism people! Give me dignity over a beafy paycheck any day!
  13. by   ASSEDO
    it's happened to me. i was in a position to totally separate myself from others in department. i stopped having lunch with them, going to christmas parties, having the monthly birthday cake, and the total separation has worked. now the bullies wonder what i up too...i will speak to them, but only say "hello" if they do first, but i do not communicate with them at all. if the building was on fire, i would not inform them. this has worked for me. not everyone can do the above. i was told by a psychologist that it is ok to cut people out of your live if they drain you.

    [font='times new roman']now i see another nurse in my department going through the same thing

close