Any thoughts?

  1. I need some "seasoned" input here. I'm constantly worried that I don't know enough. I think that if I'm not studying when I'm not working, then I'm, in effect, saying that I'm "smart enough" and my patients don't deserve more.

    I want to say it's almost a guilty feeling that I have, but that's not entirely true either, because I love learning. I just feel like if I'm not doing it constantly, I'm letting my future patients down or something. Is this totally nuts?
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   elizabeth321
    Are you a student nurse? If so you probably are studying plenty!
    I have been in the health care field for 20 plus years. I am not learning every minute but I learn soemthing new everytime I go to work...I am always reading nursing articles, taking courses etc. It is an ongoing process...the fact that you don't think you know it all is a good thing in my mind....but don't beat yourself up....it is an ongoing journey not an arrival.

    Liz
  4. by   nursekatie22
    No, I just finished school....and I really DO love learning, I guess I just get depressed sometimes about the amount of stuff I know versus what I DON'T know!
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    How about subscribing to nursing magazines?
  6. by   SuesquatchRN
    If you're a new graduate the impetus to study just hasn't worn off yet. I'm in school for my RN - am an LPN - and always feel guilty if I'm not reading something for school.

    Marie's suggestion is a good one.
  7. by   TazziRN
    You're not expected to know alot as a new grad!!!! And you're not expected to be spending every waking down minuted studying, either. The knowledge will come as you go, relax.
  8. by   nursekatie22
    I know, I know....When I would go up to ICU for clinicals I would be petrified, but I could still function and the nurses at that hospital (Fresno Community) were really supportive and said they'd rather have a scared student who's not afraid to ask questions than a know-it-all who could kill someone.

    I won't be able to afford a nursing subscription for a month or two cause of just working out finances, paying off loans, etc, but I plan on doing that, joining the ANA, etc if not just for education purposes! Thanks for making me not feel so freakish!

  9. by   TheCommuter
    Always keep in mind that most learning takes place informally, meaning that it doesn't arise from any book in existence. As a nurse, your learning will come from challenging situations, repeated observations, and numerous hands-on experiences. Also, learning is lifelong. In nursing, there is something new to be learned every single day of your career.
  10. by   nursekatie22
    I can already tell a huge difference just from working full time rather than two partial clinical days a week! I guess I just needed to gripe a little....
  11. by   traumaRUs
    I've been a nurse for 15 years total and am a recent (May 06) grad of an APN program so I'm a new grad too - lol. I do have those feelings because now the buck stops with me. I can choose to call the doctor, but even if I do, I know I must have my ducks in a row and have taken all the prelimiary steps first.
  12. by   TrudyRN
    I read nonstop, always have. Anything I can get hold of. Biographies, history, gardening, cooking, car repair manuals, you name it, I read it. Even Nursing stuff, imagine that.

    There's nothing like experience but, as an instructor told me long, long ago, the difference between an RN and an LPN or an unlicensed aide is that the RN knows WHY we do this or that. We have to study to know the anatomy, physiology, chemistry, physics, microbiology, psychology, spirituality, and all the techniques we use for IV's, dressings, med administration, documentation, teaching, etc.

    These days, nurses also need to be very savvy re: business (accounting, etc.) and re: understanding how to do the survival dance that we all must do. It is a cutthroat scene in health care today. And as long as greed and profit are the major factors in it, don't look for that to change any time soon.

    So don't ever stop studying, observing, doing, reflecting. And probably the best way to really learn something is to teach it to someone else. I wish you well and congratulations on your recent graduation.
  13. by   eandgsma
    Your not alone...I'm starting my 3rd semester of nursing school and I feel like the more I learn, the less I know. Kind of like the more I realize that I don't know JACK and I have so much more to learn. I guess that's a good thing though, I know I need to learn more and that I don't know everything. I was also told that I knew when to ask questions and was not afraid to do so. That was a compliment! I'm sure it will get better and I will feel more comfortable as time goes on, just like you will. Like you said earlier, you already feel more comfortable working F/T rather than just two clinical days a week! I find the short clinical days to be a hinderance as well. Sometimes I wish we could do longer days. That's why I took a position as an extern, so I can become more comfortable and learn, learn, learn.

    Good luck!
    -N
  14. by   nursekatie22
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I've been a nurse for 15 years total and am a recent (May 06) grad of an APN program so I'm a new grad too - lol. I do have those feelings because now the buck stops with me. I can choose to call the doctor, but even if I do, I know I must have my ducks in a row and have taken all the prelimiary steps first.

    Wow.....that would scare the crap outta me!:uhoh21:

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