Any new grad ever been let go after 6 month trial period?

  1. I'm a new grad who is almost at the end of the six month probation or trial period in my hospital job. The manager who hired me left and the new manager seems to not be pleased with my work. Besides being talked to virtually every day about some non-clinical situation I should have handled differently, I was told "I'm hearing bad things about you since I've taken over here", and not given details. I know there are still many things I don't know in nursing and I don't mind constructive criticism or coaching, but I'm at the point where I simply dread to see this manager.
    I am updating my resume and starting to look just in case. Unfortunately this hospital is part of a big health care network in this area, and if I have to leave this network, my job options are quite a bit more limited.
    What should I be doing at this point?
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  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   caliotter3
    By updating your resume and starting to look now you are doing what you can and should be doing at this point. You can fight the issue by insisting on feedback and specifics, but you already sense a negative outcome. Beat them to the punch by lining up a new job, even if it is only part time for now. Good luck. Sorry this is happening to you. Nobody deserves to hear negativity every day without constructive criticism and guidance to help them be successful.
  4. by   JaxiaKiley
    I'd start looking now, even within the same network. Just be sure to not leave on bad terms.
  5. by   chuck1234
    Make sure you are not going to be fired!
    Resignation is different from being fired...I am sure you know what I am trying to say to you!
  6. by   Halinja
    Can you transfer to a different unit within the hospital? A different unit, with a different manager, might make all the difference.
  7. by   CHATSDALE
    is this the mgr over the whole hospital or just the area that you are working in at this point in time??
    if it is possible for you to transfer to a different flooor and just put some distance between that nonconstructive critizism
  8. by   AfloydRN
    Ask for a meeting w/ this manager and ask her for specific examples of what you are doing that she thinks is wrong. Tell her you can't fix it if you are not even aware of what the problem is. Tell her you like this job ( if you do ) and want to learn all you can. If that doesn't work- send the resumes. You are a nurse and will NOT have trouble finding something else.
  9. by   Ruby Vee
    you're doing the right thing by updating your resume. look around for another job, even within the same system. a different manager may make all of the difference. and be aware that sometimes a job just isn't the right fit for you -- it could be as simple as the fact that you look like the manager's husband's girlfriend (or something equally stupid that has nothing to do with you!)
  10. by   Bala Shark
    Quote from cjj0603
    I'm a new grad who is almost at the end of the six month probation or trial period in my hospital job. The manager who hired me left and the new manager seems to not be pleased with my work. Besides being talked to virtually every day about some non-clinical situation I should have handled differently, I was told "I'm hearing bad things about you since I've taken over here", and not given details. I know there are still many things I don't know in nursing and I don't mind constructive criticism or coaching, but I'm at the point where I simply dread to see this manager.
    I am updating my resume and starting to look just in case. Unfortunately this hospital is part of a big health care network in this area, and if I have to leave this network, my job options are quite a bit more limited.
    What should I be doing at this point?
    Hi, I am a recent grad and got let go after two months...The CNAs, other nurses all reported me for some unjust reasons..Yea, in the nursing field, there are many co workers who would say bad stuff about you so you will not keep your job..Maybe you were in a facility that done this..I think one nurse turned me in because she was in fear of losing her hours because I was a new employee who wanted to work the PM shift..

    You should quit before you get fired..So when you put this employer in your resume, you can say it did not work out rather than being fired..
    Last edit by Bala Shark on Feb 9, '07
  11. by   Diahni
    My sympathies - Anybody can correct me if I'm wrong, but I think sometimes a worker can rub a person in charge the wrong way. No matter what the details, would you really want to work there anyway? I am just a student nurse, but have nurse friends. Please know that this happens all the time. A good friend was fired after one incident. Briefly, a recently fired CNA was visiting her mother at the hospital and was impossibly abusive. My friend went to the nurses station, and muttered to another nurse, "what a rhymes with witch." It hardly matters what your "offenses" are - after all, if you did anything significant, you know you would have been fired on the spot. I bet you are worried about how this will affect prospective jobs, but don't. Nurses are in the line of fire, and sometimes, they're going to get hit.
    There is a good job waiting for you, and if the firing comes up, you have your side of the story to tell.
    Diahni
  12. by   NextSummer
    I would look for another job and leave that place without any further hesitation. It's not even worth trying to straighten things out by talking to the manager, although that's the way textbooks suggest. But in a real world that usually won't work.
    I personally hate people doing this kind of backstabbing, and the worse is that they smile in front of you so that you never know who reported you to a manager!
  13. by   mismissy69
    I feel your pain, If I were you I would be looking for another job as well. Maybe try an agency where you dont have to get into the politics and if you are somewhere you dont fit in or dont like they can find you somewhere else for you. It sounds like your current supervisor isn't empathetic to the fact that you are fresh out of school, she should give you the benefit of the doubt and maybe offer to reorientate you. i think thise who have been doing this for so long forget how it is when you are "fresh meat" you are intimidated by others and sometimes not confident in yourself. I experience this at times as well Im fairly new at this nursing stuff, but in the end you have to do whats good for you. I wish you all the luck
  14. by   oualie20
    I just wrote a long reply to your question and with one wrong button push it got deleted:chuckle anyhoo a smiliar thing happened to me. I'm still on orientation but when I got called into the office that night I applied for another job. I got the other job and agreed to a per diem position. I realized that on my unit there is an inner circle made up of nurses, nursing assistants and unit coordinators. If that inner circle doesn't like you then you'll continue to receive bad reviews (reminds me of high school) anyhoo...last night a nurse that is just off her 6 months told me she'll be leaving the unit in two weeks. Apparently she's been asked to resign. This nurse is fabulous, she's a great nurse, great person, just great all around I couldn't believe it when she told me. She also told me she thinks it's because "they don't like her." From my own experience with the inner circle I totally agree with her. I feel bad because she has no job to go to and she has children.
    So I agree with you update your resume and start the job hunt, and if you're asked to resign, thank them for giving you the opportunity to find the unit where you belong. Good luck to you, you are not alone in your situation, don't let someone's lack of management skills make yousecond guess yourself as a professional. PM if I can be of more help.

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