Any FUN nursing Jobs? - page 2

Okay, maybe this is asking a bit much...but I want to know if anyone is having any fun doing their job? Does anyone love to go to work? I don't mean they like it more than anything else in the world.... Read More

  1. by   Bessie
    Molly J
    What a thoughtful response. That had to take you a while to type! I really appreciate the indepth information. You pointed out some good key points. I am young, 32 with 2 kids (5&3) and a wonderful husband. I have seen some yicky stuff in my own life...incest,physical abuse, abandonment, foster care, family members on drugs and the list does continue. Even though I have survived this "stuff" I am not hardened and am still quite sensitive. I want to help everyone...I know, I know I need to get over it! Helping everyone is impossible. I just feel so much for the people I meet in the hospital. Like the double bka, end stage renal failure with no family; or the 18 month near drowing x's 2 who is now a vegetable; or the Mom who has had 4 PROM resulting in delivery and death and who desparately wants children.

    I think I just need to jump in, do what I can and enjoy the people that I do have something to offer too. Where ever I work is going to have to been fun because I am a FUN person!

    Perhaps I gave you all too much info. Sorry!
    Thanks for the positive responses!
    Bessie
  2. by   st4304
    Bessie,

    When I began nursing school, I knew I wanted to be an OB nurse. BUT when I did my OB clinicals, I HATED IT! Don't get me wrong, I loved the babies and new parents, but I just didn't "click" with that type of nursing. I really felt lost because that was what I thought I wanted to do for most of my adult life (I got my RN at age 35). By my last semester, I was feeling pretty anxious about nursing and if I was going to like it, when I started rotations through the critical care areas of a huge hospital. The first time I saw a patient just out of open-heart surgery -- I mean chest tubes, balloon-pump, every kind of drip pouring into this man, bells and whistles -- and one nurse alone was taking care of this man, I knew this was where I belonged!!! It was so awesome. After I passed my boards, I worked for a few months on a busy med-surg unit (where I learned so-o-o much) and then was able to transfer into the SICU and have worked critical care ever since. I am a code junkie, I admit it. There is nothing as fun as getting a AAA repair fresh from surgery (patients bypass the recovery room if they are on a vent at my hosp and go straight from surgery to the SICU)! All those tubes and drips!!! Sure, there are sad things that happen and many times I left wishing I could have done more, but we also had a funny (and wicked) and very, close group of great nurses who knew when it was fun time and when it was "haulin' *ss" time. In fact, and I think everyone will agree with me, your co-workers have a very huge part in whether or not you like your job.

    I now work in a cardiac cath lab (had to get better hours because of my kids) which can get pretty hairy at times (but not enough for me -- isn't that sick?)

    You sound as though it is hard for you to keep the sad stuff at work and not take it home. Have you ever thought about outpatient surgery, occupational medicine, cardiac/pulmonary rehab, a physician's office -- areas where the patients are not as sick? Anyway, the point of this post is everyone has a niche, -- you just need to find yours! Good luck! Peace!

    Sherri
  3. by   ttmoss
    Hello, I know you posted a few days ago, but I just wanted to let you know that I have been working in a Psychiatry unit for the past 8 months and in the beginning I had some fun, but then I realized that many of the people that I work with have picked up some of the traits from our patients ie: OCD. I have come across problems with delegation and our Psych Techs and Nursing leadership has stunk. I am currently going back for my NP in Mental Health Nursing and I cannot wait to go part time. I know that this doesn't help you to find something fun, but I am with you on that idea that Nursing is not always fun, sorry this sounds so depressing...
  4. by   PhantomRN
    I work the unit and I really enjoy it. The pace and feel is totally different than the regular floors. But as was stated above it is not so much the floor you work on it is the people.
    I work with a very supportive group and that makes going to work a little easier.
  5. by   miriam b
    I used to be mostly unhappy as a nurse working in a hospital. My time management skills werent the best.I had lots of frustrations. Tho I did love working with the more emotionally difficult patients. Then I found home care. I do pediatric visits around Chicagoland. Very interesting job. Boy, has my Spanish improved! Lots of flexibility. Lots more time to play on the job. I love having the kids help set up their IV antibiotics and making jokes about being a vampire, geting the siblings involved in the care also is fun. It is the perfect place for me.
  6. by   Ben Thair RN
    I think that "fun" in a nursing job is a matter of attitude. Clearly, no nursing job will be fun all of the time, and there are many "tasks" or "duties" that will never be fun. However, the experience that an individual has in any kind of a nursing role can be extremely rewarding, challenging, inspirational, entertaining, amusing, frightening, exhausting...etc. The sum of any nursing job should be positive. If it is not, examine your attitude first - examine the state of your job second - make the appropriate adjustment.
    I personally have been in nursing for 20+ years. I have worked in NICU(neonatal not neuro!), PICU, high risk L&D, Antepartum, Primary Physician office, & Community Health. I have worked full and part time, I have worked all shifts in 8, 12 or 10 hour shifts. I have managed dozens of people and multi-million dollar budgets, provided postmortem care on Christmas, transported seriously ill and injured children, cried with mourning families, delivered babies, lectured in nursing schools, given thousands of vaccinations and been the hand-maiden to physicians who have no idea what a nurse really is. At the end of the day (week/month/year), the sum of my experience as a nurse must be positive...if not, it is time for me to change...either my attitude or my role. There are too many options, too many opportunities, and too many places where you can "have fun" and be happy as a nurse to suffer either yourself, your patients or your co-workers through an experience that is no longer "fun". Seize the moment and make a difference!
  7. by   MollyJ
    Originally posted by Bessie:
    <STRONG>...I have seen some yicky stuff in my own life...incest,physical abuse, abandonment, foster care, family members on drugs and the list does continue. Even though I have survived this "stuff" I am not hardened and am still quite sensitive. I want to help everyone...I know, I know I need to get over it! Helping everyone is impossible. I just feel so much for the people I meet in the hospital. Like the double bka, end stage renal failure with no family; or the 18 month near drowing x's 2 who is now a vegetable; or the Mom who has had 4 PROM resulting in delivery and death and who desparately wants children.

    I think I just need to jump in, do what I can and enjoy the people that I do have something to offer too. Where ever I work is going to have to been fun because I am a FUN person!...

    Bessie</STRONG>
    When we have had the pain "first person" in our lives and we see pain in others lives, we are changed and we know the gravity of what we are seeing. I don't necessarily think there is any "getting over" this but I think there is assimilation. The difference here is likely semantic to some, but to me "getting over it" means you don't notice it, it doesn't hit you. Assimilating it means you can feel that breath taking wave of hurt, or pain, or fear and not deny it, and you even notice your own pain or sorrow over the event and you acknowledge it. You say, "This hurts. It is scary. It is sad." You recognize that it does not make you a lesser person, but a more human person to feel it. It means you care and are humane. It can mean taking the moment it takes to say simply, "I'm sorry. This is a lot of loss you have experienced," to the mother who has lost multiple babies and staying with them when they cry. It doesn't mean talking blame talk or trying to fix (the hard part for me).

    Actually, as time has gone on, I think I have become more open to the pain that life circumstances cause people. It is real and deserves acknowledgement.

    Try writing in a diary and always take care of yourself, as I wrote earlier.
  8. by   Bessie
    You all have posted such thoughtful replies and I really appreciate each and every one of them! It seems to me that I will have to find the place, team of people and position that brings me enjoyment and Fun! I think this is inevitable because I have never been able to work any place that made me unhappy so why would I start now.

    The funny thing is that I have interviewed on a Peds oncology floor and I think I want to work there. Talk about finding the fun!? I know that this is going to be challenging work!! But I think enough challenge so I won't get bored along with pt and family education and support. This may sound weird but they don't have pt care techs so I get to do all my own work! I actually look forward to doing everything. Perhaps this is my ignorance coming through. These kids generally have their parents at their side and they want to help so I won't always have to do everything.

    Anyway, I will report back
    Bessie
  9. by   bungies
    Bessie,

    If you want a job which will combine your wish to stay sensitive and the need to find humour in a job you can't go past paediatric oncology. The kids there have a black humour all of their own!

    A friend of mine's youngest sister was diagnosed with a spinal cancer, and when in remission she joined CanTeen (an Australian group for teenagers with cancer). These kids are incredible. They went on a camp a few years back which was situated (by a wonderful lack of foresight) right next door to a cemetary. The kids thought this was fantastic! All sorts of jokes about "at least they won't have far to take us"...
    Black humour, but humour. There's ALWAYS humour working with kids.

    It should also give you plenty of scope for "helping" - the kids somewhat, but the families much more so. And yes, you'll howl often, but as MollyJ said, as long as you learn not to be immobilised by it, that won't make you any less a good nurse.

    I'm also in the last few months of my nursing course, and looking at oncology/palliative care. I'm also prone to cry a bit, but I find the need to help people overrides the need to cry - at least till I get home!

    All the best with your grad year!

    Kathy.
  10. by   nomad
    I can only speak for myself and can honestly say that I love what I do...I have been nursing for 15 years and have used my licensure to work in Mexico, Dominician Republic, Tahiti and am presently working in an ED in Alice Springs Australia...in August I am going to be part of the medical team for the Australian Safari..a 7 day 5000K road rally from Alice Springs to Darwin...I am hard pressed to think of any profession that can allow one to so easily see the world and work in a multitude of challanging and interesting arenas. But, that is just my opinion and I could be wrong.
  11. by   Vailgang
    I don't know if I would say my job is FUN but I do enjoy and like my job. I think the key is that I have a nice boss for once in my nursing career. I work in the office for a neurosurgeon. He seems to respect my opinion and is very good about teaching me about neurosurgery. He often says thank-you and tells me what a good job I am doing in the office. Even with the few stressful days we have had it is easier and more enjoyable when you know someone appreciates it.
  12. by   leesonlpn
    I do love going to work.We get a laugh every shift, there is a broadway musical in me which leads me to a song in most situations.We I go home I say - I'm so glad we had this time together, just to have a laugh or sing a song,seems we just get started and before you know it, comes the time we have to say, so long. Only true carol burnett fans can sing along to this one. I also carry a hand held whoopie cushion in my pocket sometimes. People will forgive you for one pfhoooot, but when you do two, they make eye contact. It sepends on who you work with, as to how your day goes, but for the most part we can get our patients humoured as well as us. (If only the staff would take their meds on time, things would be alot easier for me!) Janet Barclay, I like your water gun idea.It would be neat to shoot a doctor and hide.

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