Another organ dilemma so soon.... - page 7

Convicted killer's transplant sparks ethical debate Many argue inmate is not entitled to donated liver YORK, Neb., Feb. 28- Farmer Calvin Stock's life was saved by a liver transplant three... Read More

  1. by   Going80INA55
    "quote from sjoe"

    Unfortunately, IMHO, the US Supreme Court has ruled that anyone held against their will by a government agency ( in a jail, prison, on a psych hold, etc.) is ENTITLED to taxpayer-provided health care. Taxpayers have NO choice in the matter unless and until that ruling is overturned.

    konni writes: "Even children on Medicaid can't get organ transplants paid for by the state. They have to raise money from private donors. If the children who are being cared for with state money can't get an organ transplant paid for by the state, why should prisoners? "

    A simple solution. All the child has to do is commit a serious crime, be convicted, and sentenced to an extended incarceration (no probations or acquittals will do it).

    I can attest to this first hand. Some years. ago I wanted assistance for my son. The state told me I made to much money to qualify, but suggested a solution.
    They told me to have my son commit a crime then the state would pay for whatever he needed.....INCREDIBLE BUT TRUE
  2. by   night owl
    I'm not sure I want to be an organ doner. It just doesn't seem fair that good people have to pay for their organs, but prisoners who have committed a crime against society can receive organs free of charge. They get a better deal than those of us who pay ALOT of money for health insurance which doesn't even cover organ transplants. We work hard to pay our taxes so that we can..... pay for prisoners organ transplants. The message here is: (sung to the tune of "We Are The World") "We Are the Suckers!" Are we crazy doing this for our prisoners, our dregs of society? Yes we are! People need to come together and get serious about stuff like this. Write to your congressmen and let them know that we aren't going to take this kind of abuse anymore as American citizens. Providing a cell, food and a bed for them is one thing, but organs? It's a kick in the azz to us taxpayers. The kicker is they've probably never paid one cent in taxes in their entire lives! Prisoners are the leaches of society...they feed off the American taxpayer, but they never seem to get full. It's not fair, it's not ethical and it's just plain wrong! The line must be drawn somewhere. Let them pay for their new organs if they want them and then let's see how many of them receive organs. You and I shouldn't have to pay for them, but we do and that should be a crime in itself! Is someone getting rich off of this stupidity???
  3. by   semstr
    Originally posted by Nurse Hag
    Well I for one would like to have Semstr come to nebraska and foot part of the bill for her getting this surgery. I do agree she probably will not make the changes to be put on the list but, on the off chance she does I do not want to pay for it or the follow up care. I feel my tax dollars can go for better things. I wish our Govenor would step in and say no but that would be like keeping up with issues in this state other than the ones he creates. STOP THE INSANITY!!!!!
    Nurse Hag, thanke you very much for your invitation, but I prefer to live where I live now.
    and yes, I am paying a lot of taxes already, for prisoners getting medical help too.
    and I have no problem with that. After all, they are human beings too.
    Sorry, guys, but reading a lot of posts here, makes me feel rather uncomfortable.
  4. by   emily_mom
    Thank you semstr for presenting your opinion in a mature way. That's why we're all here....to disagree!

    I understand your perspective, even though I don't agree.

    Kristy
  5. by   JedsMom
    I work in a jail and have for going on 9 years now. I see inmates come and go on a VERY regular basis. As has been said before, she has stayed sober for 20 years because she IS in jail. What would make her stay sober if she was released??

    We deal with constant non-compliance. We get them well, they get released, they do something wrong again, back to us in need of care again, we get them well again, etc. etc.

    Even if they passed all the criteria to go on a transplant list, would they remain compliant if released from jail or prison? If there wasn't a nurse there every day to give them their anti-rejection medications would they remember to take them or even bother to go and get the RX filled??

    Who would pay for the medications once they were released from prison? Would it be covered under medicaid or medicare? If not and they couldn't afford the medication would their body go into rejection and the transplant be for not anyway?

    Just wondering.
  6. by   maureeno
    Again, my posts were not intended to make people feel bad
    that is why I used the phrase "those who had already decided"....


    here is a list of what is usable
    *Organs: heart, kidneys, pancreas, lungs, liver, and intestines
    * Tissue: cornea, skin, bone marrow, heart valves, and connective tissue
    * Bone marrow
    http://www.organdonor.gov/default.htm


    I remember the days special "God" boards would decide who was worthwhile to be eligible for the limited renal dialysis which was available.
    Our technology is always pushing at our ethics.
  7. by   nurseleigh
    Originally posted by Tilleycs
    I'm personally not thrilled to be paying for ANYTHING for prisoners - cable, electricity, uniforms, hot water, heat and A/C, 3 meals a day, beds, health care. They've done WHAT to deserve being given all this for FREE???
    I agree with part of this. I don't think that prisoners deserve cable, or a fitness center that probably rivals any that I would have to pay dearly to use. But a lot of the rest of that is basic necessities of life. Food, water, clothing, a bed.

    I mean, really, how humane would it be to deny them those things?

    Leigh
  8. by   ktwlpn
    Originally posted by nurseleigh
    I agree with part of this. I don't think that prisoners deserve cable, or a fitness center that probably rivals any that I would have to pay dearly to use. But a lot of the rest of that is basic necessities of life. Food, water, clothing, a bed.

    I mean, really, how humane would it be to deny them those things?

    Leigh
    Let me ask you this-how humane is it for someone to break in my house and steal my silver,jewelry and electronics and maybe vandalize it and kick my dog on the way out? Or knock and old lady down and steal her purse? Or rape someone?How humane is it to murder someone during robbery or a drug deal? Basic needs-nothing else-and bring back those chain gangs.overcrowed? Erect some tents...Plenty of people in the US-adults and children-live in worse conditions...If prison was truly HARD time the rate of recidivism might just drop
  9. by   yannadey
    This woman killed someone ending their life why oh why should she get a second chance by getting this liver transplant. She did not give her victim a second chance & who's to say if she gets paroled she would not go back to drinking & murdering again. Yes prisoners are entittled to medical care, but it should be basic nothing extraordinary to prolong their life.
  10. by   Katnip
    I've got to agree. Basic care. Food, shelter, water, and freedom from torture. And let them work for their room and board. Right now too many prisoners have it way better than a lot of hard working folks out there. There have been cases where prisoners have sued because they got apple juice instead of orange juice. An absolute waste of tax dollars.
  11. by   Q.
    Yikes, even I agree. Basic food and clothing. No TV. Maybe some donated books. Exercise can be accomplished by pounding rocks or making license plates or other manual labor. Heck, we had a correctional facility that used to farm the fields for their own food and aside from the building, were totally self-sufficient. Not anymore, unfortunately.
  12. by   sbic56
    Heck, we had a correctional facility that used to farm the fields for their own food and aside from the building, were totally self-sufficient. Not anymore, unfortunately.
    Now, that, I like. Tending these farms gave a sense of accomplishment, responsibility and built esteem. And, asside from perhaps death row inmates, aren't we supposed to be in the business of rehabilitation? I saw a piece on inmates training therapy dogs awhile back. Great program. These felons were able to know what it was like to be needed, trusted and they gave back to the community from which they were previously a problem in the process.
  13. by   fab4fan
    I saw a similar piece; it was amazing how some of the most hardened criminals were able to develop a bond with their dog, and know what it's like to feel needed/loved.

    It was really touching...these dogs just giving these guys unconditional love. It might have been the first time any of those men ever got that. But this is the perfect kind of thing for an inmate; it gives him something constructive to do for society, and it gives the inmate a feeling of being needed/loved.

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