ANA & specialty nurse organizations

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    I belong to both ANA, PSNA, AND specialty organizations: NGNA, NCGNP. I believe that as professional nurses we must first, put forth the cause of nursing by membership in our state & national nurses organizations. Then, if we are so inclined, belong to specialty organizations that reflect our own unique interests.

    Hope this helps

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    Tis with our judgements as our watches, none go just alike, yet, each believes his own.
    -Alexander Pope
  2. 18 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    I did not join ANA because they tend to be pro-abortion and I am not. I can get the education about my area of interest without paying dues to anyone and really see no need to join an organization.My state allows non-union members to enjoy the same benefits as union members so unions have a hard time existing in Texas. Politically, I can contact my Congressman/woman without being a member of an organization.
  4. 0
    I am currently a senior nursing student enrollrd in a BSN program at Curry College. I have all intention of becoming a member of the ANA among other specialty organizations in the near future. I believe that nursing organizations represent nurses as a profession. Thereby, empowering the voices of nurses to be heard in politics. According to Catalano (Nursing Now! 2nd edition) the ANA is one of the most powerful in Washington. The ANA Political Action Committee is a strong voice in the implementation of current national health-care reform. I only see nursing organizations as having a positive influence in nursing.
  5. 0
    I originally became a member of ANA inadvertantly, due to our hospital's union affiliation--it is mandatory to join--otherwise we can donate our dues to a specified charity. I think ANA has been listening to the rumblings of the "people" at the frontlines of nursing--the ones who pay the majority of dues to the organization....THE STAFF NURSES. It wasn't always my perception. I think they are trying to address our concerns....but initially when all the*%#@ started happening in nursing (work redesign, layoffs, replacing RN's with unlicensed assistive personnel etc.) I felt like they were not very effective and really out of touch with the majority of nurses. I think they are far too focused on advanced practice issues and could do better by investing in the bulk of the nurses who operate in the trenches of hospitals etc. They are SO politically entrenched and have an agenda that is far too broad perhaps. On the other hand, I am a member of my specialty practice organization, AWHONN (Association of Womens Health and Obstetric and Neonatal Nursing). They gave me MUCH NEEDED support during our work redesign process. The AWHONN "nursing practice rep" was completely aware of issues unique to my area of practice-OB--and -what was safe and prudent practice etc. During our Work Redesign fiasco, I faced off with administration about the need to retain the RN as primary provider of care for the laboring and high risk anteparal patient. I was completely and unconditionally supported by AWHONN. There was a knowledgeable person familiar with OB issues and practice, A person to talk to and to help me articulate practice concerns. I do not believe I would have gotten the practical suggestions and guidance from the ANA because the particulars of our practice concerns couldnot have been as deeply understood by the ANA. Mostly, I believe it is because ANA's agenda is so very broad based. Regardless of what the nursing organization's agenda/focus I think they should never lose sight of the need to dedicate a large portion of their mission to advocate and support those at the core of nursing.
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    L.Smo RN

    [This message has been edited by lsmo (edited February 25, 2001).]

    [This message has been edited by lsmo (edited February 25, 2001).]
  6. 0
    I am in an MSN program and will be taking part in a debate about nursing organizations. Our questions focus on whether professional nursing organizations that focus on clinical area of practice are best suited to meet the needs of members, or is membership in the ANA by the majority of nurses necessary for the profession to effectively participate in the political/public policy arena.
    I'm interested in your opinion about specialty organizations and the ANA. Do you belong to one or the other, or both, or none? Why did you join? Do you feel that your needs are met? Is cost a factor? Any other thoughts?
    Your replies are greatly appreciated!

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  7. 0
    Interesting topic. I am a member of AACN, but not ANA. ANA didn't interest me. I joined AACN primarily because of the educational resources offerred, and our Chapter is pretty active. The organization definitely has helped me meet my educational needs etc. Cost is of course a factor- but I also don't have any idea what ANA actually would "do" for me. So I didn't bother to join, even though it was promoted and pushed heavily in school.
  8. 0
    I belong to Sigma Theta Tau which I have found to be very useful to me both professionally and personally. I am in a union which is not ANA affiliated. I do not belong to ANA because they offer me nothing, take political positions I don't support and are very expensive.
  9. 0
    Lately, the ANA has become very pro-active for the bedside nurses. Whether you are a member of ANA or taking part in the Million Nurse March or both, you are doing something to promote better conditions for nurses.
  10. 0
    Originally posted by Janeen Smith:
    I did not join ANA because they tend to be pro-abortion and I am not. I can get the education about my area of interest without paying dues to anyone and really see no need to join an organization.My state allows non-union members to enjoy the same benefits as union members so unions have a hard time existing in Texas. Politically, I can contact my Congressman/woman without being a member of an organization.
    The following link: http://www.nursingworld.org/readroom...ial/screpr.htm explains the ANA's position on abortion, quite well in fact. I don't think avoiding the ANA for that reason is worth it considering what they are trying to do for the nursing profession.
    For instance, a bit of personal info here, I am pro-choice, yet I voted Republican for the MAJORITY of the practices of the party. I don't make choices based on one thing.
    But, you have your own choices to make, as do we all.
  11. 0
    I joined the ENA but not the ANA due to the cost. It just costs too much. I wanted to get the magazine (The Emergency Nursing Journal) and help support ENA research.
    ANA is not necessarily pro-choice, but pro-patient and supportive of what is currently law in this country. They know that if Roe v. Wade is overturned, nurses will have their hands full taking care of women, again, who have backstreet abortions. (See the post above).


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