An Indian Brave Knows No Pain?!

  1. Hello everyone, I hope someone can help me out...

    I was wondering if the German saying "Ein Indianer kennt keinen Schmerz" (literal english translation: "An Indian Brave Knows No Pain") has an equivalent in English.
    ...or is "An Indian Brave Knows No Pain" correct?!

    Thanx a lot in advance!
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  2. 13 Comments

  3. by   Gennaver
    Quote from stuntdouble
    Hello everyone, I hope someone can help me out...

    I was wondering ...if the German saying "Ein Indianer kennt keinen Schmerz" (literal english translation: "An Indian Brave Knows No Pain") has an equivalent in English.
    ...or is "An Indian Brave Knows No Pain" correct?!

    Thanx a lot in advance!
    Hello Stuntdouble,

    Your reason for posting this here makes little sense to me.

    However, as a mixed cultured person, (Native and Euro) I consider re-hashing such stereotypical biases as insulting.

    Why not pull up some ancient "Ancient Woodsmen of Germany" stereotypes and apply them or some other such thing? Catch my drift? Meaning, I do not viewe it as approrpriate.

    Unless there is some other reason you are seeking dated, stereotypical and prejudicial biases.

    Migwetch, (thanks in Ojibwemowin language)
    Gen
  4. by   zenman
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hello Stuntdouble,

    Your reason for posting this here makes little sense to me.

    However, as a mixed cultured person, (Native and Euro) I consider re-hashing such stereotypical biases as insulting.

    Why not pull up some ancient "Ancient Woodsmen of Germany" stereotypes and apply them or some other such thing? Catch my drift? Meaning, I do not viewe it as approrpriate.

    Unless there is some other reason you are seeking dated, stereotypical and prejudicial biases.

    Migwetch, (thanks in Ojibwemowin language)
    Gen
    Maybe she is trying to be more aware of cultural differences between people...a good thing.

    Randy
    (German, Dutch, Indian, Irish)
  5. by   sunny59
    I think it is simply "An Indian does not know pain"

    We had to do presentations presenting "stereotypes" of different cultures, and how to avoid/correct them and how damaging they are, in our nursing program. I suspect this is why this question was asked. Not to insult anyone.

    There are some very good books available on this subject, look up Cultural Nursing on Amazon - or Google it.

    Sunny
    German, Irish, Scot
  6. by   stuntdouble
    I'm really sorry, if I did upset someone with my question, which wasn't meant to insult anyone.

    I just was curious about the cultural differences based on the saying in question, curious if it exists (or in a similar way) in English, if it's still in use etc.
    I admit the saying sounds quite outdated, political incorrect and even stupid cause Indians feel pain too, but that's not my fault, I did not invented it.

    maybe i should have added that the saying is used here in Germany when a kid gets injured and you try to convince the kid that crying is 'uncool'.

    so, sorry again.


    Quote from sunny59
    I think it is simply "An Indian does not know pain"

    We had to do presentations presenting "stereotypes" of different cultures, and how to avoid/correct them and how damaging they are, in our nursing program. I suspect this is why this question was asked. Not to insult anyone.

    There are some very good books available on this subject, look up Cultural Nursing on Amazon - or Google it.
    Thanx Sunny!
    Last edit by stuntdouble on Mar 23, '07
  7. by   Gennaver
    Quote from zenman
    Maybe she is trying to be more aware of cultural differences between people...a good thing.

    Randy
    (German, Dutch, Indian, Irish)
    Hello Randy,

    Possibly this or maybe that, an introduction would have been wise.
    Gen
    p.s. it would also direct responses more appropriately too
  8. by   gr8rnpjt
    I live in USA and never heard anyone say this. But when my son cries, I give him a hug and kiss
    I have heard the saying, "big boys dont cry" and maybe that comes from the same source.
  9. by   stuntdouble
    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    when my son cries, I give him a hug and kiss
    yeah that is probably the best thing to do in those cases.
  10. by   Balder_LPN
    Quote from gr8rnpjt
    I live in USA and never heard anyone say this. But when my son cries, I give him a hug and kiss
    I have heard the saying, "big boys dont cry" and maybe that comes from the same source.

    Oh come on, talk about perpetuating stereotypes. Men have the same right to dosplay emotions as women.

    sniff....sniff
  11. by   tutored
    Hey, Stuntdouble, don't feel so bad...I'm not so sure why you got your head bit off like that...to me, your question was an attempt to understand the meaning behind a saying from a culture different from your own. I used to live in Germany, where I heard that saying once. I explored that colliquialism with a group of german friends (I'm american, obviously), and found out that they have great, great respect and empathy for the continued plight of Native Americans, and how their land and lives were hijacked away. These young germans I met were more informed about the poverty that continues to exist on reservations, than many of our own. As I understood their use of the term (I speak German), it is not a racially-stereotyped saying. What I didn't realize until I moved there was how deeply ashamed many young germans are of their past around WWII. Don't be afraid to post again!
  12. by   Gennaver
    Quote from tutored
    Hey, Stuntdouble, don't feel so bad...I'm not so sure why you got your head bit off like that......

    Hello,
    From where I read it, post number two involves no "biting heads off".

    Not sure why you and another poster read it that way but, hey, its your world too.
    Gen
    p.s. edit: Honor the treaties
    Last edit by Gennaver on Mar 24, '07 : Reason: afterthought
  13. by   tutored
    Quote from Gennaver
    Hello,
    From where I read it, post number two involves no "biting heads off".

    Not sure why you and another poster read it that way but, hey, its your world too.
    Gen
    p.s. edit: Honor the treaties
    Hey,, Gen, I'm sure you didn't mean your response to stuntdouble's post to be abrasive, but go back to your original response to her post, looking at your two lines, "your posting makes no sense to me", and, "I find,..... insulting"...next, go to Randy's defense of stuntdouble in post #3, and then read stuntdouble's contrite, apologetic response to your post in her #5 post, and then read my post again, where I, too defended her. Again, I didn't think you meant to sound a tad crabby, but somehow your post caused stuntdouble to apologize in embarassment, while two other nurses jumped to her defense. If I had written a post that caused that reaction, I might re-think my wording. I'm not criticizing you, and, as you said, "it's your world, too", but, in this message, as well, forgive me.....you sound, too me a little cranky. I may be wrong. To leave on a positive note: congratulations for making it to the finish line in nursing school!
  14. by   stuntdouble
    Quote from tutored
    As I understood their use of the term (I speak German), it is not a racially-stereotyped saying.
    Hallo tutored , you are right the saying has more of a romantic/nostalgic undertone, it kinda describes the admiration for the strength & dignity of Indians.
    The saying must be quite old, probably when boy's superheroes were Indians and they devoured Karl May's (http://encyclopedia.thefreedictionary.com/Karl+May) wild west books and dreamt of being/living like them in plain nature.

    I must admit that I was quite shocked by Gennaver's response, I wasn't aware that the saying/term would diverge that much between cultures.

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