America's view of the nursing profession - page 2

Hi everyone! I have noticed that different people in society all have very different views of nursing. Some think that nursing is a "dirty job", meaning that it involves many unpleasant tasks. Other... Read More

  1. by   Thunderwolf
    Please folks, lets keep it civil and respectful to others here. Elatty gave us a good topic to start off a good discussion. Let's honor the original poster. I know we can.

    Thank you.
  2. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from elatty
    Hi everyone! I have noticed that different people in society all have very different views of nursing. Some think that nursing is a "dirty job", meaning that it involves many unpleasant tasks. Other think nurses are "overworked and underpaid." What can we do as members of the nursing profession to change these views?
    Returning to your regularly scheduled thread question my opinion is that since every person in the US will be in the hospital or will have a close relative in a hospital or point of nursing contact, that we do all the grassroots education that we can.

    Take the opportunity to clearly TEACH your patients what we can do. For instance, I point to my badge and say, "I'm Angie, your Registered Nurse for the evening. I want to make sure that you know that if you look here on the badge, that you will see exactly what job the person has, and you may also ask the person what their job title is.

    I encourage you to ask questions about your care, and while we might not all be able to answer every question, we'll be happy to get the person who can. Questions about your medications, tests, and treatments are questions will be more appropriately directed to your nurse or your doctor."

    Happily, all of our CNAs, Unit Secretaries, and other ancillary staff correct patients who think they're nurses, so that correction really helps clear up misconceptions.

    We can do a lot of teaching about what nurses know in a few shifts with the same patient or family.

    On the whole, if my patients have no respect for nurses when they come in, they do when they go home.
  3. by   imenid37
    Here's a link to a recent poll showing we are well respected. Idon't know if we are always well understood.
    http://www.globalethics.org/newsline...11219922225391
  4. by   nicunana
    Maybe it's because I work in a Children's Hospital, but whenever people find out what I do and where I work, they fall all over me with praise and compliments. Everybody seems to know someone who has been here and they rave about how caring my coworkers and I are. I get this over & over and have to admit that it makes me feel not only respected, but downright revered at times!
  5. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from imenid37
    Here's a link to a recent poll showing we are well respected. Idon't know if we are always well understood.
    http://www.globalethics.org/newsline...11219922225391
    Once again, these polls say nurses are TRUSTED not respected. There is a HUGE difference.
  6. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from RN4NICU
    Once again, these polls say nurses are TRUSTED not respected. There is a HUGE difference.
    And i feel that in order to get respect, we really ought to be respectful amongst ourselves.
  7. by   FroggysMom
    First of all, I agree with you Marie...respect should go both ways.

    But in keeping with the thread, my personal experience of being a nurse has been, overall, quite positive. Yes, there are people who might think differently, as there are all sorts of prejudices out there. The public opinion of nurses isn't helped by people like Jay Leno (see another thread on this one). He was being disrespectful and showing his ignorance. And perhaps that is the crux of the matter - ignorance.

    IMHO, many things in the nursing profession has to change. First and foremost we need to quit disrespecting each other for whatever reason, be it educational differences, cultural differences, where we work, what kind of nursing we choose to do, etc.

    How can we change the public image of nurses? There are lots of ways I suppose but to me the best way to inform the public of the professionalism of nursing is to BE professional. Be respecful of the patient no matter what his or her background or condition in life. Be mindful that the patient will remember most the nurse who was understanding, who did not necessarily give in to every whim of the patient, but who did the best to get that patient into a better state of health and/or affairs. They will remember the nurse who taught, or even attempted, to teach them about their condition, the nurse who comforted them in times of need.

    I can't fight the likes of Jay Leno...we will never have the audience that he does. But we can teach by example.
  8. by   Q.
    Quote from bluesky
    "Blue collar trailer trash" is a completely offensive term used by people who are clearly classist.
    Is it any different than "pink collar" (as nursing is often defined) or "white collar?"

    It is meant to imply the type of job - blue collar meaning physical labor.
  9. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Blue collar's one thing. Pair it up with derrougatory phrase ("trailer trash") gives it a whole other meaning. Not to mention it does nothing to help anything.

    Is it any different than "pink collar" (as nursing is often defined)
    First i've ever heard of the nursing profession referred to as such.
  10. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    And i feel that in order to get respect, we really ought to be respectful amongst ourselves.
    Well, pardon me, but I don't see where I was not respectful. I was STATING A FACT. These polls are about trust...not respect. It even stated that clearly in the title of the reference page. Many times on these boards, these surveys are referenced, people are trying to prove their point of "look how respected nurses are" when that is not what is being said at all. Perhaps you could consider taking your own advice rather than pointing fingers at others? I have the same right to express my views as you do without being accused of being disrespectful or some other atrocity.
    Last edit by RN4NICU on Oct 19, '05
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from RN4NICU
    Well, pardon me, but I don't see where I was not respectful. I was STATING A FACT. These polls are about trust...not respect. It even stated that clearly in the title of the reference page. Many times on these boards, these surveys are referenced, people are trying to prove their point of "look how respected nurses are" when that is not what is being said at all. Perhaps you could consider taking your own advice rather than pointing fingers at others? I have the same right to express my views as you do without being accused of being disrespectful or some other atrocity.
    Never said you weren't being respectful. You DID state a fact.

    I was agreeing with you in that post, and added an "and", so do not jump all over me. I did not accuse you of anything.
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Oct 19, '05
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Anyway, i wish the surveys would ask the question WHY do you trust nurses? What would the answer be? How often do people trust someone that they don't respect?
  13. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    Never said you weren't being respectful. You DID state a fact.

    I was agreeing with you in that post, and added an "and", so do not jump all over me. I did not accuse you of anything.
    OMG, I'm so sorry! By the way you had quoted my post above yours, I took it to mean that you thought I was being rude to this person I replied to by pointing out that this "trusted" thing is very often misinterpreted to mean respected. BTW, I wasn't trying to hurt anyone's feelings with that statement, I was just trying to make the distinction clear. It was a knee-jerk reaction to what I thought you meant (got my feelings all hurt for nothing...). My bad.

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