Am I In trouble? - page 3

by gwafuh_rn | 2,906 Views | 37 Comments

I worked last Tues,night shift (7pm - 7am). An lvn was the one who endorsed me the patients that i will be taking care during my shift.One of the pt has an order of vancomycin iv q tuesday and it was written at 02:00 pm by the... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from gwafuh_rn
    It was written on tues at 2pm by the pharmacist.I worked at tues(7pm - 7am).Am I the only one at fault?
    Absolutely, you are not the only one at fault. I think there is to much worrying about fault. I think it was wrong of the supervisor to come up and lay it on you like it was your fault.
    gwafuh_rn likes this.
  2. 2
    No, you are not the only one at fault, but as nurses, a big part of our job is catching and correcting the mistakes of others. That is the portion of it that falls into your realm of responsibility, so yes, you do share some of the responsibility here. Not all of it, but some.
    leslie :-D and gwafuh_rn like this.
  3. 3
    Quote from egglady
    I would have questioned the order from the get go. Military time has the "0" before the number for am. Such as 0200 would we 2 am. 1400 would be 2pm. I would also say it is a pharmacy or transcription error. there is no such thing as 0200pm.
    I kinda was a little confused by the way the time is written as 0200pm. But, 2 in the morning seemed a very odd time to give a weekly vanc dose. Actually, a weekly vanc dose seems a little odd to me, but maybe that is used in other areas.
  4. 0
    Quote from jessiern
    I kinda was a little confused by the way the time is written as 0200pm. But, 2 in the morning seemed a very odd time to give a weekly vanc dose. Actually, a weekly vanc dose seems a little odd to me, but maybe that is used in other areas.

    Me, too. But I don't know.
  5. 0
    the pharmacist wrote the order 0200 pm. with the word pm on it.
  6. 1
    Hi,
    I agree with the other replies. I would question more why you waited to report the patients elevated temp to the doctor. By the way, was there a vanco bag in the fridge? That could have raised the question whether or not it was given. I seriously doubt this is an issue that could result in a loss of your license. However, like the others have said, a lesson learned. I also agree with the others that the cause of the sepsis is unlikely to be a few hours missed of a weekly vanco dose. Try to relax.
    gwafuh_rn likes this.
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    the rn who was covering for the lvn that time just called me a while ago.She told me that the lvn didnt told her that there was an order for a vancomycin.Anyways,the reason I didnt call the doctor because the pt had a prn med for elevated temp. I got worried when the pt had an elevated temp at 0400 am.That's the time I called the doctor.The rn told me that its not the reason why the pt had a sepsis because 1 bag of vanco wasn't given.
  8. 3
    Honey, stop worrying. You won't let something like this slide again and really, that's all you can do.

  9. 0
    sorry.thanks for the help.
  10. 0
    One dose of Vanco is not going to keep a guy from going septic. He would probably have ended up in ICU anyway. You should have called the MD again. No response in a "reasonable" amount of time and you are required to do something about it. i.e. call him/her again, call the house superivisor and tell them you can't get in touch with the attending MD, contact the supervising MD whatever the hospital's protocol is for the chain of command so to speak. This patient deserved to have an MD on his case 24/7 while in a hospital. As the patient's advocate you were required to get him that care. As a legal consultant I would urge you to know your procedure and don't let too much time lapse from first attempt at contact to the next step.


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