Am I sensitive about the title Nurse?

  1. One of my coworkers told me today that her husband (who current works for the cable company, no offense but I am trying to give you the picture) is going to go to OK and start working as a FLIGHT NURSE for $150,000 per year...I said I did not realize he was a nurse and asked about where he went to school, etc. She hemmed and hawed around and said his background was 'EMT Plus". I asked if that was above a a paramedic, and she said yes. I am confused. Is there such a thing as an EMT Plus? If so, do they fly? One thing I know is if he has not gone to nursing school, passed an exam, etc. them he is not a nurse. The older I get the more this aggravates me. Maybe I am getting crotchety. Any thoughts??
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   bopps
    No, you are right. I am a new nurse and things like this bug me too! I worked my rear end off to become a nurse. I earned that title. There is no shame in being a EMT paramedic. If that is what you are than you are not a nurse period. You worked hard to become a Paramedic, call yourself one! It really annoys me when people call their family members who are CNA's QMA's or MA's nurses when they are not. If you didn't take the NCLEX RN or the NCLEX LPN you are not a nurse PERIOD!
  4. by   ebear
    bopps,
    surgical techs are called nurses, too.:trout:
    ebear
  5. by   RN1989
    Unless you have the title RN, LVN, or LPN (in the US of course) you are NOT a nurse. In some states it is ILLEGAL to pass yourself off as a nurse unless you have the license to back up the title.

    Can't count the number of times I've had pts families try to act like they know my job because they are a nurse. Questioning gets them to finally admit that they were an aide. Then a little more questioning gets them to admit that they weren't a CNA but just happened to help Grandma when she got out of the hospital for her broken hip.

    I think I would ask this woman again what exactly her husbands credentials are. Is there some reason that they don't use the term Flight Medic? Sorry - never heard of an EMT +. Kinda makes me wonder if he is needing some kind of ego boost or the wife is embarrassed by his training or lack thereof and that is why you got such an odd definition.
  6. by   MzMouse
    It bothers me too. I hear the general public call everyone who works at the clinic "a nurse." Everyone in the lab, everyone is radiology, the receptionists and certainly of course, the few CMAs we have at our clinic.
    I have made it a point to correct friends and family.
    This is a case of anyone being better than anyone else. But unless you are a nurse, you shouldn't be called a nurse!
  7. by   Spritenurse1210
    I think I would ask this woman again what exactly her husbands credentials are. Is there some reason that they don't use the term Flight Medic? Sorry - never heard of an EMT +. Kinda makes me wonder if he is needing some kind of ego boost or the wife is embarrassed by his training or lack thereof and that is why you got such an odd definition.[/QUOTE]

    or maybe she's just ignorant and explaining the title he has to her understanding.
  8. by   FlyingScot
    Your co-worker is lying. No such thing as a EMT-P+. 150k a year is highly unlikely. Most flight RNs don't make much more than a hospital based RN. I took a pay CUT to do my current job! Quality flight programs don't hire people with minimal experience and cable installation doesn't count. She's insecure...ignore her when she tries to bring it up.
  9. by   NursingAgainstdaOdds
    This drives. me. CRAZY. !!

    HUGE sticking point for me, those that are not actually nurses using the term.

    Funny story though...recently, my Mom started working as an HHA at a facility where my son has day care, and I worked as an aide prior to graduating nursing school. My son (2 yo) asked me what his Grandma does, and I said "She helps sick people, like Mama". That's our quintessential 2-year old appropriate definition of a nurse for the 2 yo, and I borrowed it to describe what Grandma does. He asks me all the time what I'm doing at work "Mama, you doh to work, you help sick peopuwhl?":heartbeat. Yesterday the kiddo told me "I saw Grandma at daycare, Grandma's a NURSE!!".

    It was really, really hard not to try and reinforce my definition of a nurse for my 2 yo. But, I gave up. "Yeah...okay...".

    But yeah, with people over the age of 12, I WILL correct them.
  10. by   smk1
    Do you think she means EMT-P (she probably thinks the "P" means "plus")? Strange. Either way I've never heard of a flight nurse making 150k...
  11. by   Michigan Man 09
    idk, I don't let it "BUG" me per say, but if someone is ignorant and uneducated and using the term NURSE in my presence when I in fact know they are NOT a nurse, i will correct them that the person is NOT. Yes it is irritating but what are you going to do, people are going to think what they want. People are ignorant, uneducated, and stereotype. Its the same thing as a person saying, "I'm going to buy a Toyota"...and you ask, "What do you like about it? How did you decide to buy one?" and they respond with, "b/c it has great quality and everything else is crap. I'm a brainwashed, uninformed, sheep following the herd ignorant adult." WHY not consider a Chevrolet, Ford, Pontiac, Mercury, Buick, Hyundai, Ford, Honda, Nissan, Subaru, VW, etc. ? Make an informed decision and drive the competition's products before you spend thousands of your hard earned dollars...

    Yes it may bug me, but its life. Deal with it, protect the integrity of the RN title when you feel it is appropriate setting to perform a 'teachable moment' with someone using it incorrectly.

    You know what a nurse is, I know what a nurse is, and our patients know what a nurse is. When people NEED healthcare (b/c everyone will eventually) people will understand the difference then.

    Michigan Man 09
  12. by   Cindy1008RN
    I agree, Nurse is a title that is earned. I am very protective of my title. I hate the confusion that is generated when people call themselves a nurse.

    Maybe, it has something to do with the fact that our language does not have another word that can be used to adequately describe a lay person that is taking care of someone that is ill, elderly, or disabled.

    Parents nurse their kids back to health
    New moms nurse their babies
    Back in "The Day", there were wet nurses. ...I am sure there are many more


    Since the term "NURSE" is used in such generic ways, maybe we should ask if they are an RN, LVN, LPN.


    I mean let's face it, our language is quite confusing. We make all of these grammar/spelling rules, only to turn around and give a list a mile long of exceptions.. And let's not even get into homonyms. LOL.

    Once, again, I am there with you all with the frustration.
    Last edit by Cindy1008RN on Oct 11, '07
  13. by   SaderNurse05
    Thanks for all of the replies. I broke down and dug up my Texas Nurse Practice Act (egads!!) and it states in Part 2 under definitions "nurse-a person required to be licensed under Texas Occupations Code chapter 301 to engage in professional or vocational nursing." I think this co-worker is just getting on my nerves- her dad is a doctor and before I started my boss told me to watch her because she likes to "practice" medicine..The thing is she graduated from a good college with a good degree and she is our secretary. Maybe she does feel like she needs to say outlandish things. I couldn't care less what they do. Really. If I am going to worry about stuff like that I can start a lot closer to home. I did drop it because she was getting uncomfortable but I remained confused. BTW I have always thought flight nursing would be AWESOME. When I worked as a med tech years ago the flight nurses would walk through in their orange jumpsuits with tools hanging off of them, their names over the pocket like in the military, and everyone else would just look. It could bring the cafeteria to a standstill. If I had started nursing earlier i would have definately looked into it. Thanks for all the good info!
  14. by   happydays352
    Quote from Cindy1008RN

    Maybe, it has something to do with the fact that our language does not have another word that can be used to adequately describe a lay person that is taking care of someone that is ill, elderly, or disabled.

    I think we do it's a caregiver, that's what I call myself, yes I know that's a broad term but it fits perfectly, I'm giving care .

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