Am I crazy?

  1. I am 37 years old and just started graduate school in psychology 6 months ago. I had always wanted to get my masters but due to marriage and 3 kids have not been able to until now. The program is very competitive and I was one of only 12 candidates chosen. So, I should feel honored to be in this program. But, my heart is not in it like I thought it would be. I worked so hard to get in, and now I'm not sure I want to do this.

    My mother is a nurse (RN with masters), my only 2 aunts are nurses (RN's with masters), one brother is a nurse, my other brother is a doctor, my father is a doctor, my SIL is a doctor. Basically, my entire family is in the medical field. My mother always wanted for me to be a nurse, but I always resisted the idea. I was very rebellious, and our relationship was not a good one. So, I am thinking that perhaps I was really meant to be a nurse and just resisted the idea due to my feelings toward my mother. Now, that our relationship has improved, I am actually open to the idea. I feel like I know so much already just growing up and spending so much time with nurses and doctors that I think I would be a really good nurse.

    How do I know if that is the path I should take? If it is, how do I deal with the embarassment of being so wishy washy with my life at 37
    •  
  2. 21 Comments

  3. by   CritterLover
    well, first of all, know that many begin a career in nursing in their 30's and 40's. when i was in nursing school, many of my classmates were over 35. and there is no way that your education in psych would be "wasted" in nursing. psych is the hardest part of nursing for many.

    as for knowing that nursing is really for you, the best thing that i can suggest would be to shadow a nurse for a while. maybe volunteer in a hospital. see what nursing is like day in and day out.

    good luck.
  4. by   ton
    i don't see any problem you are doing right!!
  5. by   TheCommuter
    You are absolutely not crazy at all.

    In fact, you're are so very fortunate to have hailed from a well-educated family. It truly helps when you have an abundance of family members who have 'been there' and, therefore, know which actions to take that will help you get there, too. You should feel very blessed.

    For several years I have been dealing with the 'crabs in a bucket' situation, where one crab tries to climb out and the other crabs pull him back down. I belong to a large, extended family where no person has completed college. My road to completing school has been made more difficult by parents and other family members who know virtually nothing about college and believe that school is silly and impractical. They simply do not see the lifelong benefits of education because they're concrete thinkers.

    Take the path that you feel will benefit you. 37 years of age is still young. Also, learning is a lifelong process with more benefits than drawbacks. Good luck to you!
  6. by   kcalohagirl
    I graduated from nursing school at the age of 32. There is no way I would have been prepared for the BSN program I went through right out of high school. I needed some more time and maturity before I was ready to make that decision. I would say that probably 1/2 of my classmates were over the age of 25 (in a class of 52) and of many of those were over the age of 30.

    Good luck with your decision!
  7. by   lyallch
    I was 36 when I graduated from nursing school. I had one classmate who was 58...so what is the problem?
  8. by   caliotter3
    There is a lady who has started posting on this site (can't think of her screen name right off) who is, like 55, and, I think taking pre reqs for nrsg. Long ago an acquaintance said that his mom went to nrsg school when she was in her 50's. I started nrsg school for the second time (first time I quit over a couple of issues-one of them being partly immaturity) at the ripe old age of 37
    It has not been easy, have encountered brick walls, and lots of pot holes in the highway so to speak, but I'm still at it. A background in psych will prove invaluable, so don't discount it and don't be in such a hurry to quit it. For example: one of my former classmates had a MBA from an Ivy League school, another had a doctorate in divinity from another distinguished school and they were there in nrsg school slugging it out like the rest of us. Even though you are intellectually well beyond most, I would recommend going to the bottom of the totem pole so to speak to try it out. . . . .You can continue along your current path and still get certified nursing assistant training and do a little work in a long term care facility. You can even find some places where you can find some volunteer positions, just to get around the atmosphere without FOREVER COMMITMENT. You just might find that you find a useful outlet for your nurse longings (like the biological clock for older females who start thinking about that little critter they never had). Hope this helps. And remember, even those who started at 3 yrs old down the path sometimes feel like maybe they should have done something different. Lots of good wishes your way and will keep positive thoughts for you.
  9. by   caliotter3
    Oh, and I'm certain you should become aware of, if you are not already, that you can specialize in psych nrsg/counselling. You really can have the best of both worlds. Gosh knows, we can use some effective psych nurses. So please take some time to research the possibilities that are in front of you! Peace.
  10. by   NaomieRN
    Go for it!
  11. by   RN007
    Heavens, no, you aren't crazy. All your prior schooling will prove invaluable to nursing. I left a 20+ year career in another totally unrelated field to enter nursing because I felt called to do something meaning. I'm 48. My previous master's degree won't be wasted and already having been through college has been tremendously useful in nursing school (good study habits, understanding how academe--and red tape--work, etc.). As one retired nurse told me, "Listen to your gut -- I think it's God speaking to us."
  12. by   swatch007
    Quote from artsy3
    I am 37 years old and just started graduate school in psychology 6 months ago. I had always wanted to get my masters but due to marriage and 3 kids have not been able to until now. The program is very competitive and I was one of only 12 candidates chosen. So, I should feel honored to be in this program. But, my heart is not in it like I thought it would be. I worked so hard to get in, and now I'm not sure I want to do this.

    My mother is a nurse (RN with masters), my only 2 aunts are nurses (RN's with masters), one brother is a nurse, my other brother is a doctor, my father is a doctor, my SIL is a doctor. Basically, my entire family is in the medical field. My mother always wanted for me to be a nurse, but I always resisted the idea. I was very rebellious, and our relationship was not a good one. So, I am thinking that perhaps I was really meant to be a nurse and just resisted the idea due to my feelings toward my mother. Now, that our relationship has improved, I am actually open to the idea. I feel like I know so much already just growing up and spending so much time with nurses and doctors that I think I would be a really good nurse.

    How do I know if that is the path I should take? If it is, how do I deal with the embarassment of being so wishy washy with my life at 37
    I don't think you are crazy; you are just immature. Take a look at yourself. You wanted something, but when you got in you've been hesitant to pursue it. Now you are contemplating to become a nurse since your mother has been wanting you to do so, but you did not want it before. It's just because your mother-and-son relationship has improved that is why you changed your mind. And you think you would be a really good nurse because you have spent so much time with nurses and doctors. Maybe they are very nice nurses and doctors. What if you spend some time with nurses who are burned out and somehow momentarily hostile to you, you might become hesitant again to pursue this nursing career. I suggest that you don't just based your major decision on emotion. For your age sake, be more objective when making decision. ( of course you are not old, but you could have accomplished more if you had use your wit).

    LIfe is series of struggles. YOu have to take a dose of reality and ask yourself of what do you really what to do in life before your time to take oppurtunities in life run out. YOu are not always young and strong as you know. All well-intended advices here are useless unless you make up your mind and take action. So grow up!! and I wish you the best!

    Tough love
    Last edit by swatch007 on Dec 26, '06
  13. by   artsy3
    Quote from swatch007
    I don't think you are crazy; you are just immature. Take a look at yourself. You wanted something, but when you got in you've been hesitant to pursue it. Now you are contemplating to become a nurse since your mother has been wanting you to do so, but you did not want it before. It's just because your mother-and-son relationship has improved that is why you changed your mind. And you think you would be a really good nurse because you have spent so much time with nurses and doctors. Maybe they are very nice nurses and doctors. What if you spend some time with nurses who are burned out and somehow momentarily hostile to you, you might become hesitant again to pursue this nursing career. I suggest that you don't just based your major decision on emotion. For your age sake, be more objective when making decision. ( of course you are not old, but you could have accomplished more if you had use your wit).

    LIfe is series of struggles. YOu have to take a dose of reality and ask yourself of what do you really what to do in life before your time to take oppurtunities in life run out. YOu are not always young and strong as you know. All well-intended advices here are useless unless you make up your mind and take action. So grow up!! and I wish you the best!

    Tough love
    I am sure you are trying to help, and I appreciate the advice. But, first...I am a female. And second, I don't think I am unaccomplished. I graduated college, worked in the field of psychology, got married and chose to stay home with my 3 children working as an artist out of my home in order to stay home. It is now that my youngest is almost 4, that I am ready to go back to school to either get a masters in psychology which would allow me to work in that field for more money or choose a different path. The decision of which path to choose is not a choice based on emotions. It is a choice based on which would be a better fit for me.
  14. by   artsy3
    Thanks so much everyone for such great advice and insight. I really appreciate it!

close