Allowing more than RN on name badge? - page 3

does your facility allow you to have designations other than rn on your name badge (such as rn, bsn/ rn, ccrn etc.)? our hospital does not allow this and it is a thorn in the side of some of the rn's... Read More

  1. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from KellieNurse06
    People like that seem to have power trip issues from what I have seen...........

    Tsk, tsk. I long to see the day when nurses can be proud of their educational acheivements without being accused of being "on a power trip" or "snobby". If someone wants to wear their credentials, whatever they may be I say go for it. In fact the sooner we value our education and our achievements, the sooner others will do so. It's no wonder many people think nurses are undereducated handmaidens.


    My facility allows it.


    SharonH, MSN RN
  2. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Ours allows it if you want it. In our dept. we have specialty coordinatiors (general, vascular, gyn, ENT, dental, neuro, uro, ortho, cardiac) and they can have that put on their badge as well.

    Example: Mine is

    Marie (and hyphenated last names)
    LPN
    Perioperative Department/Ambulatory Surgery
    Orthopedics Coordinator

    (So many words, it looks like a brochure)

    Once i graduate, the LPN will be replaced with "RN, ASN"
  3. by   adria37
    The reason Magnet hospitals want it on the name tag is because it helps end the thinking that a "nurse is a nurse is a nurse" because as nurses we are different and we have different educational levels. It is no different than having CNA, LPN, RN on the badge in my opinion. I am proud of my education and I proudly wear my name tag with my terminal degree on it.
  4. by   KellieNurse06
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    Tsk, tsk. I long to see the day when nurses can be proud of their educational acheivements without being accused of being "on a power trip" or "snobby". If someone wants to wear their credentials, whatever they may be I say go for it. In fact the sooner we value our education and our achievements, the sooner others will do so. It's no wonder many people think nurses are undereducated handmaidens.


    My facility allows it.


    SharonH, MSN RN
    Ummmm I don't recall saying anyone didn't value the education of themselves or others...so I beg to differ with you on this................so no need to "tsk, tsk" me, I don't like being treated condescendingly thank you.........I have better and more important things to worry about than petty stuff like this.......and I never mentioned snobby either. People who are confident in their education/life etc etc don't go out of their way to advertise........sorry to burst the bubble......whoever wants their entire full credentials on their badge, coat, etc ..whatever that's great..knock yourselves out......not impressed really!:trout: reminds me of the people who need to have the big house, expensive cars and work themselves into the ground to pay for the "image" and never really enjoy their life because all they do is work to pay for all these things...............sorry but I know quite a few people in very respectable positions, some who are family who would agree with me on this one.........
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    whoever wants their entire full credentials on their badge, coat, etc ..whatever that's great..knock yourselves out......not impressed really!
    No one said it was to impress anyone
  6. by   neetnik461
    Adria 37 wrote:

    The reason Magnet hospitals want it on the name tag . . .


    ??? I work at a Magnet hospital and our policy is "RN" designation only (see first post of this thread). Does anyone know if the ANCC/ANA has published any suggestions/opinions regarding educational/professional designations on name badges??
  7. by   KellieNurse06
    Quote from jmgrn65
    I have signed checks my name RN, just because you sign your name a hundred times a day it becomes habit so sometimes it isn't meant to be a power trip.
    Ummm true ..I agree but this woman had the attitude to boot too, but if it wasn't for the attitude I wouldn't of said anything to her........so I know it's not "everyone" per say.......just the occasional one like this.........plus , who goes out to eat in a restaurant with their stethescope still around their neck, with the entire family in tow???? I know people forget stuff...but co me on!
    It was a "snap out of it" moment!
  8. by   KellieNurse06
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    No one said it was to impress anyone
    :deadhorse ........
  9. by   DarlinNurseRed
    I am wary of nurses who have more Initials behind their name than letters in the name itself. Lots of school teachers have more than four years of education, and they don't need a name tag with initials to validate what they do. I think just plain "RN" is sufficient for me personally. This is not to offend or inflame anyone else, of course.

    If initials make ya feel good, then by all means, get some on the tag.
    Last edit by DarlinNurseRed on Aug 19, '06
  10. by   adria37
    Here is the ONS's position statement it is for oncology certified nurses and oncology certified NP's. I will look for the article about Magnet status and displaying education and credentials on name badges.

    Healthcare consumers have a right to know the qualifications of those responsible for their care. Nurses with OCN, CPON, AOCN, AOCNP, and AOCNS certification should inform patients of their certification and explain its meaning. Certified nurses should display their credentials on their name badges, and employers should support such display (ONS, 2005).



    http://www.ons.org/publications/posi...Position.shtml
  11. by   moongirl
    Quote from neetnik461

    ??? I work at a Magnet hospital and our policy is "RN" designation only (see first post of this thread). Does anyone know if the ANCC/ANA has published any suggestions/opinions regarding educational/professional designations on name badges??
    My first clinical year was at a Magnet hospital. RN only on those name badges as well
  12. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from DarlinNurseRed
    I am wary of nurses who have more Initials behind their name than letters in the name itself.

    Why?
  13. by   adria37
    Here is an article from Nursing Spectrum http://community.nursingspectrum.com....cfm?AID=10625

    "Besides the ANA, AMSN, and ANCC, more than 60 other specialty nursing organizations offer certification in everything from obstetrics and oncology to orthopedics. Each certification body abides by its own eligibility criteria-requirements that change periodically.

    Pain Leads to Gain

    For nurses who go through the certification process, their new distinction comes with something more than bragging rights: Added marketing value.

    "Marketing myself as a certified RN isn't any different from our hospital's chief financial officer having the status of an MBA," says Michaels. "Certification is a way to tell patients that I've taken an extra step to be sure my care is super."

    To help educate administrators and patients, key marketing begins with nurses themselves. Some actions certified nurses can take are --

    Wear your credentials on your name badge, or wear a second badge referring to your title.
    Sign your name and credentials on your patients' records.
    Take the time to explain your credentials to those who ask.
    Encourage your institution to reward certification monetarily and nonmonetarily.
    Market the idea as a way to advertise your hospital's commitment to excellent patient care. "

    Magnet Hospital Recognition is a credentialing process that signifies nursing excellence. It is associated with the ANA. In order to apply, a hospital
    needs to validate their care standards. The ANA does an internal review, and a site visit.They look at practice at a unit level, and at the individual nurses level. They look at how research, quality improvement, shared governance, service strategies, and professional development are utilized. They also look at how you are linked to nursing schools and the community.

    AACN's White Paper on Magnet Status
    http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Publication.../hallmarks.htm

    Differentiated Nursing Practice

    Differentiated practice models are models of clinical nursing practice that are defined or differentiated by level of education, expected clinical skills or competencies, job descriptions, pay scales, and participation in decision making (AACN, AONE & N-OADN, 1995: Bellack & Loquist, 1999; Moritz, 1991; Pitts-Wilhelm, Nicolai & Koerner, 1991). Differentiated practice models have been implemented in acute care inpatient settings, rural community nursing centers, and acute care operating rooms (Anderko, Robertson & Lewis, 1999; Hutchens, 1994; Anderko, Uscian & Robertson, 1999; Graff, Roberts & Thornton, 1999; Malloch, Milton & Jobes, 1990; Milton, et al., 1992).

    Evidence indicates that differentiated practice models foster positive outcomes for job satisfaction, staffing costs, nurse turnover rates, adverse events (i.e., patient falls and medication errors), nursing roles, and patient interventions and outcomes (Anderko, Robertson & Lewis, 1999; Anderko, Uscian & Robertson, 1999; Hutchens, 1994; Malloch, Milton & Jobes, 1990). Differentiated practice outcomes include the opportunity for healthcare delivery organizations to capitalize on the education and experience provided by varied educational programs leading to RN licensure. The registered nurse has the opportunity to practice to his or her potential, taking full advantage of educational preparation. Often, differentiated models of practice are supported by a clinical "ladder" or defined steps for advancement within the organization based on experience in nursing, additional education, specialty certification, or other indicators of professional excellence.

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