All Discussion Associate nursing and BSN nursing program?

  1. Right now I'm a college student in a major I do not want to be in. My gpa is not very high so I can't even think about transfering into another BSN nursing program. But I am looking to transfer either a lpn program or an associate degree nursing program. I really LOVE nursing and I cant wait to get started. I've looked at places and I realized the only way I can start my career to nursing is to start in a lpn or associate nursing degree program. My question is what is a better option? A lpn program or an associate nursing degree program? If I'm understanding it right, I've looked and they said that when I graduate from an associate nursing degree program I will be eligible to get my license as a RN. Is that correct? Why is it that they have an associate degree nursing program and then have it where you can then go the bsn track? If one graduates from a four year bsn program arent they eligible to get their rn license as well? My question is what is the difference between an associate degree nursing program and a bsn 4 yr program if they all are eligible to become an RN once they past the test(if I'm correct on that)? Also what is a diploma in nursing and what can it lead too?

    Sorry so many questions. I'm new to this and motivated thanks!
    Last edit by summersent on Dec 21, '06
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  2. 15 Comments

  3. by   HealingHands327
    Hey there, don't stress too much about the BSN being TOO much more different.

    The only real difference is that an RN with a BSN is eligible for some management positions an ADN RN is ineligible for. A BSN educated RN can also work in public health and pursue more advanced nursing practice such as an NP or anesthesia.

    But if you don't care about that, and just want to be a regular staff nurse then an ADN is perfect for you. Also I hear some hospitals prefer BSN educated nurses. BSN educated nurses earn a few dollars more per hour then the ADN educated nurse.

    But of course the it's an extra year for the BSN. For california, if you transfer from a ADN to a BSN program it's 2 years to complete the BSN program on top of the 2 years spent doing the ADN program making it 4 years instead of 3 just to get the BSN.

    But yeah, with both programs you will write teh NCLEX and become an RN.

    btw if you do the lpn program make sure you will be eligible for an RN upgrade later on in a CC.

    hope this helps.
    btw if your in Cali, most of the ADN programs randomly select students since there are too many eligible applicants....so good luck with that.

    :spin:
  4. by   summersent
    healing.... what do you mean by "if you do the lpn program make sure you will be eligible for an RN upgrade later on in a CC"?

    thanks a lot for the info that was very informative!!!!!!!!!
  5. by   Reno1978
    Quote from summersent
    healing.... what do you mean by "if you do the lpn program make sure you will be eligible for an RN upgrade later on in a CC"?

    thanks a lot for the info that was very informative!!!!!!!!!
    I would just make sure that any credits you earn in an LPN program will transfer if you plan on eventually attending an ADN program, to avoid repetition of course material. Sometimes credits from technical/vocational schools do not transfer in full, or at all, to a community college or university where you would be pursuing your ADN or BSN to eventually become an RN.

    For example, the only LPN program that I know of in my area is identical to the 1st year of the same institution's ADN program. So, students can opt to complete the first year, sit for the NCLEX-PN and begin work as an LPN. Or, students who finish the 2nd year earn their ADN and are eligible to sit for the NCLEX-RN and work as an RN. There would be no issues at this school with making sure all the classes one has taken to become an LPN would be considered if one decides to pursue an ADN.

    I hope that made sense, it's late here and I'm way tired! LOL
  6. by   TiffyRN
    There is an excellent "sticky" at the top of this forum that references many threads discussing all sorts of issues regarding ADN & BSN. I think it's great the moderators did the research and collected these discussions. Enjoy!

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f8/have-...ad-180528.html
  7. by   SCRN1
    Quote from HealingHands327
    Hey there, don't stress too much about the BSN being TOO much more different.

    The only real difference is that an RN with a BSN is eligible for some management positions an ADN RN is ineligible for. A BSN educated RN can also work in public health and pursue more advanced nursing practice such as an NP or anesthesia.

    But if you don't care about that, and just want to be a regular staff nurse then an ADN is perfect for you. Also I hear some hospitals prefer BSN educated nurses. BSN educated nurses earn a few dollars more per hour then the ADN educated nurse.

    But of course the it's an extra year for the BSN. For california, if you transfer from a ADN to a BSN program it's 2 years to complete the BSN program on top of the 2 years spent doing the ADN program making it 4 years instead of 3 just to get the BSN.

    But yeah, with both programs you will write teh NCLEX and become an RN.

    btw if you do the lpn program make sure you will be eligible for an RN upgrade later on in a CC.

    hope this helps.
    btw if your in Cali, most of the ADN programs randomly select students since there are too many eligible applicants....so good luck with that.

    :spin:
    I guess it depends on where you work. Here, an RN with an associates degree or BSN both start out making the same money. Also, even though they prefer someone with a BSN (because they are taught more management and theory), there are still some in management with an associates degree. I went to California last year with through an agency. I have an associates degree and there was no difference in the pay between ADN & BSN. As far as school, here for ADN, it takes three full semesters for the prerequisites (sp?) and then another 6 semesters of nursing, which total 9 semesters. The BSN program is 8 semesters. They say ADN is only two years, but they aren't counting the classes required that aren't nursing classes. Plus, you go year round with no summer break (unless you choose to and want to put off your graduation date). Whereas, BSN go Spring and Fall semesters which add up to the four years and include the other classes that aren't nursing classes. Another difference here is that ADN students use more technical skills, while the BSN students have to wait on doing some things for after graduation and start doing them on their job...such as starting IVs. The ADN program here does teach some theory and management, but the BSN goes more into it. As I said, that all is how it is here (or was when I was in school). I'm not sure how it is everywhere else.

    The ADN students and BSN students take the same tests to become licensed.
  8. by   HealingHands327
    Nicely put by Reno, ya some LPN programs are just that. You become an LPN. But when you want to complete an RN program, your LPN classes won't count towards it. Examples are technical or priviate school programs that only teach you to be an LPN.

    oh yeah, don't get stuck going to those private schools that cost 20 000 just to be an LPN. Its a waste of money when you can complete it in a CC level.
  9. by   summersent
    healing and to others....how will I be able to tell if its a lpn program will count toward me complete an RN program?
  10. by   futurecnm
    Have you done a lot of the pre-reqs required for nursing??? I would focus on doing those because you will need those first before even applying. If you have done them, then it also depends on how the schools choose their applicants. You said your GPA is not very high, and around here it would be hard for you to get into a associates degree nursing program. There are SO many applicants that they take the highest GPA's to get in, but I'm sure all areas do this different. There are a handful of community colleges around me that base on GPA (among other things, but it is a major thing the look at - the average GPA of my class this year is 3.8 I think - on the pre-nursing classes). I would prefer to be getting my BSN, but due to financial reasons I am doing my associates and then hopefully finding a hospital that will help me with tuition to get my BSN later.
  11. by   Reno1978
    Quote from summersent
    healing and to others....how will I be able to tell if its a lpn program will count toward me complete an RN program?
    My best advice would be to ask. Your goal to become a nurse is an awesome start, but your first step really should be to see what is available to you. Look up the website for your state's Board of Nursing. There ought to be a list of approved programs for both LPN and RN in the state. There may be options available that you aren't aware of.

    Next, I would schedule some appointments with advisors at a few places. Tell them you want academic advisement concerning their LPN or RN program. I would take a copy of your unofficial transcripts (usually free) for coursework that you've already completed so they can give you honest advice about what you need to do to get accepted. Ask questions about admission requirements. There are programs here that are point based...like you earn points for prereq's and general courses you've taken that apply to your degree...other programs are strictly GPA based. Get a good understanding of how they make their decision to accept you. Ask about prerequisite courses, cost, etc. Then dedicate yourself to the path that works best for you.

    Initially, I thought I'd go for an ADN. Two-year degree right? WRONG. I talked to an advisor at the community college. Here, the nursing programs require A&P I & II and Microbiology as the standard prereq's. Well, you have to take cellular biology before you can take A&P or Micro and you have to have a general chem course before you can take the cellular biology, and you have to have completed a college level math course to take general chem... I was looking at a minimum of 4-5 semesters *just* to finish my prereq's. So, I went and talked to a nursing advisor at the university. Same prereq's, but a little bit more heavy on the general coursework. Both programs, once you were in, were 4 semesters long for just the nursing portion. So what I did was take all of the prerequisite courses and general studies courses at the community college (much cheaper and they transfer in full to the univeristy) and applied for admission to the university's nursing program. I just finished my first semester of the nursing program and I absolutely am loving every minute of it. But, I must say that if I did not check out my options, I would have spent the same amount of time pursuing an ADN as I am now a BSN...I'm glad I looked to see what was out there.
  12. by   HealingHands327
    The easiest way is to speak a community college counseler. They are usually more honest about legitimate programs. Another way is to check your state. For instance california has a listing for all legitamite nursing programs.
    California Board of Registered Nursing - Approved RN Programs

    checck your state to see if there is a website provided. (lol plus if you have to pay 20 000 or a large sum of money to get into a program) it is suspicious already, in terms of wether you can use it later to pursue further education.
  13. by   summersent
    thanks for responding. yes I'm looking into all my options and what they want. So far all the ones I've looked into I researched and I'm getting info on them all. For the most part as far as I know I meet all of their requirements so I'm pretty excited so far. I've contacted many places and for the most part I'm looking what each has to say. I'm also applying in the meantime and I will be sending out my transcripts after christmas. If I can get an appointment in with an advisor or e-mail a specific advisor that would be great as well like you said reno. We'll see. I'm just taking things one day at a time....
    Last edit by summersent on Dec 22, '06
  14. by   summersent
    Quote from HealingHands327
    The easiest way is to speak a community college counseler. They are usually more honest about legitimate programs. Another way is to check your state. For instance california has a listing for all legitamite nursing programs.
    California Board of Registered Nursing - Approved RN Programs

    checck your state to see if there is a website provided. (lol plus if you have to pay 20 000 or a large sum of money to get into a program) it is suspicious already, in terms of wether you can use it later to pursue further education.
    thanks for that. Do you know any other links for other states? Like, alabama,pennsylvania,nj,de,ny,southern states etc?

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