Air Entry Assessment.. - page 2

How do you do an Air Entry Assessment on a post-op patient? How do you know if a patient has increased or decreased air entry?... Read More

  1. by   solumedrol
    Quote from Miss Ludie
    NarcoticJunkie: Are you a nursing student?
    Are you in an RN program?
    Is English your primary language?
    It seems to me that if you are on your second clinical you should be exhibiting more knowledge of Nursing terminology than you are. Please answer.
    yeah. I'm a nursing student in a 4yr RN program and english is my primary language. i think the nursing programs in canada is structured differently than in the US. i heard my professor once say that US nursing schools focus more on Nursing Terminology than Critical Thinking because thats what get tested more on the NCLEX. I don't know. She could be wrong. As for us nursing students here in Canada, we don't really get a list of terminology to memorize and we don't do much clinical practice. All we do is write a bunch of essays on nursing issues! lol. so, that might be the reason that i'm not very knowledgeable of some nursing terminology.
  2. by   solumedrol
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    No, its not.

    Maybe where you are from...

    So you would say, the pt has diffuse crackles in his 'air entry'? Or his 'air entry' has diffuse crackles...

    Or, after intubation, people will say, "he has air entry bilaterally"???


    Narcoticjunkie, that's an odd screen name.
    i'm from Canada.

    lol. we don't chart like that.

    we just chart like:

    "Pt. has decreased air entry in right lower lobe."

    as for the crackles, we chart it like this:

    "Pt. has crackles on right uppper lobe on expiration."
  3. by   muffie
    skidood to work 2day
    we use the term air entry a lot
    up in canada
  4. by   Miss Ludie
    I'm sorry but Canada is not that far afield in education. Why do you not know names of common medications, wording for physical assessments, medical abbreviations?
  5. by   aklrnbn
    I'm from Winnipeg (in Canada), and that is how we chart respiratory assessments, i.e. Good a/e bilaterally with fine crackles to the LLL, or decreased air entry to the RLL with coarse expiratory wheezes throughout. Been doing it for 6 years, and that's just how we do it, and the doc will say after intubation, "air entry bilat"
  6. by   solumedrol
    Quote from Miss Ludie
    I'm sorry but Canada is not that far afield in education. Why do you not know names of common medications, wording for physical assessments, medical abbreviations?
    i'm not sure.
  7. by   anne74
    Quote from Miss Ludie
    I'm sorry but Canada is not that far afield in education. Why do you not know names of common medications, wording for physical assessments, medical abbreviations?
    Wow - you're embarrassing me as a fellow American nurse. When you say "common" names, you are referring to the names that are common to YOUR area. Other parts of the world (and other parts of the U.S.) use different terminologies. Like the whole "centimeters" vs. "sonameters" thing. It doesn't mean it's incorrect, or that someone doesn't speak English as their primary language! (Was that a serious question?) It sounds to me like you haven't ever worked outside of Graceland. Am I right?

    If I was to encounter a Canadian nurse who used the term "air entry", I would assume they meant "airway" or simply to air getting into the body. It sounds like a pretty logical term to me.

    And to the student - always feel free to ask questions. In fact, it's dangerous and irresponsible to not ask questions. You're doing the right thing! Just ignore the nurses who aren't as gracious in helping others. Good luck to you.
    Last edit by anne74 on Oct 8, '06
  8. by   aklrnbn
    Basically, it means, is there air moving in all fields. There is no 'air exit'. You can have fair a/e, poor a/e, decreased a/e etc.. First we deal with the a/e, then the adventitia, like crackles, wheezes etc.. Just how we've been taught.
  9. by   muffie
    thank you anne 74 for not being judgemental

    and for good advice
  10. by   solumedrol
    thank you anne74 for the good advice.
  11. by   traumaRUs
    Thanks for the additional info. I too had never heard of air entry.
  12. by   VivaLasViejas
    Yep.........I learn something new every day too. Thanks to our neighbor to the North!
  13. by   augigi
    Well maybe's it's a "Commonweath country" thing, because here in Australia, we definitely assess air entry as decreased, bilateral etc. I've been a critical care RN for 10 years and always been taught that way. We still use crackles, wheeze etc, but usually write "decreased AE L) LL" for reduced breath sounds in the left lower lobe.

    Not sure why all the attitude towards the OP, but NarcoticJunkie, you need to know what "A-B-C"s are ASAP!!!
    Last edit by augigi on Oct 9, '06

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