aggressive behavior - page 3

It's often difficult to know exactly what to "subject" the message in order to get the most views, and therefore, get some feedback. If you are reading this, hopefully you have experience with... Read More

  1. by   Sleepyeyes
    Originally posted by OBNURSEHEATHER
    Excellent post! I will, however, disagree that there are no cues. There are usually distinct signs of escalation. But perhaps those not used to that type of behavior don't pick up on them as well?

    Before my first job in an inpatient rehab, I had to take a 2 day seminar on escalating behaviors and self defense. I'll actually be retraining soon.

    Heather
    I've been caught off-guard a couple of times by sudden, unpredictable behavior from a pt, and only by the grace of God that I haven't been injured. Other staff members --and sometimes other pts-- weren't so lucky.

    It's helpful, IMO, to have a clue from somewhere that you're dealing with a pt with potential for violence. After all, what's worse? Having a pt. suddenly get violent and hurt someone or having the knowledge to be prepared to help this person regain control quickly?

    To me, a potential for violent behavior is as valid a concern as "fall precautions," and a staff that is prepared is a staff that can better protect the pt, other pts, and themselves from harm.
  2. by   mattsmom81
    Originally posted by Sleepyeyes
    I've been caught off-guard a couple of times by sudden, unpredictable behavior from a pt, and only by the grace of God that I haven't been injured. Other staff members --and sometimes other pts-- weren't so lucky.

    It's helpful, IMO, to have a clue from somewhere that you're dealing with a pt with potential for violence. After all, what's worse? Having a pt. suddenly get violent and hurt someone or having the knowledge to be prepared to help this person regain control quickly?

    To me, a potential for violent behavior is as valid a concern as "fall precautions," and a staff that is prepared is a staff that can better protect the pt, other pts, and themselves from harm.
    So true Sleepyeyes! I've been injured on the job twice in my career and both times by violent outburst in ICU ...psychotic episodes that could have been prevented if addressed and managed correctly. Often nursing and/or medical staff allows violence/aggression to progress to staff injury. It shows the disregard for nurses' wellbeing out there in the minds of some administrators, docs and even other nurses. Time it stops, IMO, and I'm glad violence in the workplace is a hot topic these days.

    I'd like to see protocols for all units not just psych. I'm tired of docs prioritizing their patient diagnoses fears over the wellbeing of the staff ie 'He's a COPD'r so you can't medicate him at all for aggressive assaultive behavior'. I've seen too many nurses get hurt on med surg units by these types of patients.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Mar 21, '03

close