Advice on going from LPN to RN

  1. I have read some great info on here and I was wondering if anyone could offer help or advice on going from LPN to RN. Whats the best way to go? How long it takes? Any and all advice will be greatly appreciated.
    Sandy
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    www.allnursingschools.com

    check the above for a college/university near you and then go there and ask to see an advisor for nursing major. This person can point you in the right direction as to how to obtain your degree. Some have bridge programs for previously experienced LPNs---look into it! Also there are online LPN-RN programs. You will also find these on that site. You can inquire by degree/program type and location.

    GOOD LUCK!!!! many ways to go, all you need do is find what will work for YOU.
  4. by   NursesRmofun
    Hi! I did it the long way by taking all the RN nursing semesters and not challenging out of any as a LPN. You can challenge out of the first semester as a LPN in many RN programs. I did have previous college credits which helped make it easier. Whatever way you go, it will be worth it! I was sorry I didn't do it earlier!
  5. by   Cali
    I am in the midst of going from LPN to RN and the process is quite simple. It only takes two years. I'm doing all my pre-req's in a year, then I have to take an 8-week LPN to RN bridge program over the summer. After the bridge program, I start in 3rd semester of the RN program. (1 year of pre-req's, 8-week bridge program, and 2 semesters of nursing school)
  6. by   RNPATL
    I took the long way also, although my RN program offered a bridge program for LPN's. Of course, I had to complete all my pre-reqs and then entered into the 3rd semester of my program. It only took me 2 full semesters to finish. Looking back at it, it really was quick. However, looking at starting, it seemed like it would take me forever to finish.

    I considered many options before enrolling in a traditional program. I really felt like I needed the structure of a classroom environment, with deadlines and other students to interact with. I also wanted the opportunity to be in the clinical arena and learn from other people who had been nursing a while.

    Prior to entering the program, I really though it would be nothing more than paying dues. Afterall, I had been an LPN for >10 years. However, once I was in the program and realized all the material and information that had to be learned, I realized that I was not just paying my dues to become an RN! It was almost like I was learning to be a nurse all over again. As an RN, your scope is very different than an LPN as well as your level of accountability and your level of overall responsibility. Oh yea, that little thing called critical thinking .... well, that plays a huge role in my life now as an RN. As an LPN, I was aware of it, but generally completed my work with little regard to it.

    Good luck with your schooling and congratulations on making a decision to become an RN. I still love signing RN after my name and it has been several years since I graduated.
  7. by   NursesRmofun
    Quote from RNPATL
    I took the long way also, although my RN program offered a bridge program for LPN's. Of course, I had to complete all my pre-reqs and then entered into the 3rd semester of my program. It only took me 2 full semesters to finish. Looking back at it, it really was quick. However, looking at starting, it seemed like it would take me forever to finish.

    I considered many options before enrolling in a traditional program. I really felt like I needed the structure of a classroom environment, with deadlines and other students to interact with. I also wanted the opportunity to be in the clinical arena and learn from other people who had been nursing a while.

    Prior to entering the program, I really though it would be nothing more than paying dues. Afterall, I had been an LPN for >10 years. However, once I was in the program and realized all the material and information that had to be learned, I realized that I was not just paying my dues to become an RN! It was almost like I was learning to be a nurse all over again. As an RN, your scope is very different than an LPN as well as your level of accountability and your level of overall responsibility. Oh yea, that little thing called critical thinking .... well, that plays a huge role in my life now as an RN. As an LPN, I was aware of it, but generally completed my work with little regard to it.

    Good luck with your schooling and congratulations on making a decision to become an RN. I still love signing RN after my name and it has been several years since I graduated.
    Patrick, I couldn't agree more!
    In the beginning it DID seem like it was going to take forever and now it is a fading memory...Well, almost. <g>
    So true about not just paying your dues also! After a while, you realize there really is a lot to be learned. In some ways, it is like learning it all over again from scratch only with many more details and more info.
  8. by   ITRY2BGOOD
    Wow thanks for the response I apprecate it. And since you said its like learning to be a nurse all over do you think it would be best to start fresh? Learning the way the whole class is learning? I was lucky enough to get my LPN degree while still in high school so I have a good bit of skill knowledge but at 16 and 17 what did I really absorb?
    Thanks Again
    Sandy
  9. by   RNPATL
    I would certainly look into a LPN to RN bridge program. That was a great way for me to finish my RN and I am sure it would work for you. Being an LPN is an advantage in your RN education because you are already familiar with the clinical environment and a lot of the terms and skills needed in nursing. A bridge program serves to further develop the skill and the knowledge that you already have as an LPN. However, you will learn a great deal more as you progress through the RN program.

close