Advice Needed

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    Hi. I have a problem that I need some advice on. I have a B.S in a non-nursing field and I really want to be a Nurse Practioner. There are 3 programs in my area that have MSN (w/concentrations in NP) programs for people w/o RNs or nursing degrees (basically entry level) that I am planning on applying too. I need to be practical and figure out what to do if I don't get in to any of them. If I don't get into any of them how do I go about and get a RN? I really don't want another BS degree. I figure if I get a RN then I would have a better chance in getting into a MSN program later on. Any advice?
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    I don't have or know of a listing of all programs in the U.S. that have MSN programs for non-nurses with bachelors degrees in other areas, but I do know of four such programs. Boston College(www.bc.edu),Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions(www.mghihp.edu/faculty/nursing2.html/#1),Pace University(www.pace.edu/schools/nursing), and Vanderbilt University(www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/nursing/) I'm sure there are many others. You might also be interested in looking into programs that offer BSN/MSN option to get both degrees at the same time or even get your associates degree and then find a program for ASN to MSN since you already have a BS. You might try contacting NLN or American Association of Colleges of Nursing to find out more info. Good luck.
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    Originally posted by Doey:
    I don't have or know of a listing of all programs in the U.S. that have MSN programs for non-nurses with bachelors degrees in other areas, but I do know of four such programs. Boston College(www.bc.edu),Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions(www.mghihp.edu/faculty/nursing2.html/#1),Pace University(www.pace.edu/schools/nursing), and Vanderbilt University(www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/nursing/) I'm sure there are many others. You might also be interested in looking into programs that offer BSN/MSN option to get both degrees at the same time or even get your associates degree and then find a program for ASN to MSN since you already have a BS. You might try contacting NLN or American Association of Colleges of Nursing to find out more info. Good luck.
    Thanks for the input. I am however originally from the East Coast and have no intention of ever moving back there. The three programs in Cal for people with non-nursing BS who want to get MSN with concentrations in NP are USF, UCSF, and Samuel Merritt.
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    I worked with a fellow who was an accountant by degree but wanted to be a nurse. He worked registration in the ED at the hospital before he made his decision. He went to the Vanderbilt program in Nashville, TN and successfully graduated. He then returned to the ED as RN, NP. Poor thing-- he knew nothing about nursing care. My advise --work as an RN, you'll appreciate your advanced practice degree a lot more when you get it.
  8. 0
    Originally posted by jdewkz:
    Hi. I have a problem that I need some advice on. I have a B.S in a non-nursing field and I really want to be a Nurse Practioner. There are 3 programs in my area that have MSN (w/concentrations in NP) programs for people w/o RNs or nursing degrees (basically entry level) that I am planning on applying too. I need to be practical and figure out what to do if I don't get in to any of them. If I don't get into any of them how do I go about and get a RN? I really don't want another BS degree. I figure if I get a RN then I would have a better chance in getting into a MSN program later on. Any advice?
    I dont know if you are mobile, but here are 2 options for you:
    VCU/MCV in Richmond, VA has a program called "Accelerated 2nd degree program" that educates you at the BSN and MS levels in the same course. It has proved to be a very successful program, but you must be prepared to work and work hard. Speak to the counsellors there. They can guide you well. Univeristy of Colorado Denver has an ND degree program to educate non-nursing folks at the Nursing Doctorate Level. A very sound program.

    Good luck.
    chas


    [This message has been edited by Charles S. Smith, RN, MS (edited November 14, 2000).]
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    I really don't see the problem with two Bachelor's degrees. I have two, and a Master's as well. Most will accept your credits from your first degree for the non nursing classes, so you wouldn't have to take those over again. I finished my BSN in three years- I had to take anatomy and physiology before I could apply to my program. You will have a better chance to enter many MSN programs if you have a BSN. Just curious- I have heard the job market for nurse practioners is sort of dry in certain areas. Do you know how the job market for an NP will be in your area? I know a lot of nurses who do bedside nursing with NP and MSN after their name. (My MS is in something else, so I wouldn't know). Good Luck.
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    I am so distraught. I originally posted this message asking for advice. I received in my email a note from some recruiter in Texas basically telling me that I am making the wrong choice going to a bridge program to become a NP b/c there are no jobs for NP at all(according to her). She suggested I go to PA school instead. Now why would this women want to squash my plans for the future so early in tha game (I mean-I haven't even applied to grad school yet). Is the job market for NPs really so horrible??? If I get into a program I won't graduate till 2005!!!! That's five years away from now.

    [This message has been edited by jdewkz (edited November 18, 2000).]
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    I do now know what your ultimate reason for wanting to be an N.P. is, but without a firm knowledge base and the experience that comes with being an R.N., you will never become a good N.P. My B.S. in Nursing helped me to acquire the broad foundation I needed to make advanced practice nursing studies meaningful. If you really want to be an N.P., then the education that you must go through is well worth it.

    Besides, as a general R.N., you will have a broad sampling of the areas you can obtain your N.P. in. There are Family N.P.'s, Acute care N.P.'s, Pediatric N.P.'s, Women's Health N.P.'s, Adult Health N.P.'s, Gerontological N.P.'s [my personal favorite!], and a few others that escape me right now. The Master's level helps you to narrow your focus and specialize in a particular area. Ideally, this speciality is selected by you, based on your R.N. experiences.

    Good luck with whatever you do.

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    I don't know who this recruiter is or what s/he wanted, but a PA school is not necessarily the best idea. I lived in PA and commuted to New York for 4 years part time to acquire my M.S./G.N.P., because the scope of practice for N.P.'s in New York is much broader than it is here in Pennsylvania. As a result, the University I attended there taught me to be an autonomous practitioner. I am not saying that PA. schools would not do the same thing, but I can't see how they would considering NP's in PA do not have independent practice. I recommend you go to a couple of the schools you are interested, and ask a lot of questions. Also, contact your state board of nursing for a copy of the scope of practice for NP's in your state. That will be very helpful.

    In terms of job opportunities, I am currently working at my second N.P. job, and love it. It depends upon your specialty, experience, and abilities [why I recommended getting experience as an R.N., it does count in the long-run]!!!

    Best of luck!

    -T.J.
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    Tim,
    I think the poster meant P.A. school, as in physicians Assistant, not schools in Pennsylvania. But I do agree the scope of practice in NY for an NP is very broad. I also agree that it will be very hard to be a good NP without the RN experience.


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