Adn's Who Don't Care - page 4

hello all, i would like to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get there bsn's. not because of laziness or not wanting knowledge or anything else negative, but just don't... Read More

  1. by   ortess1971
    I have been thinking about the BSN only because I have been fascinated lately with the idea of going to law school and becoming a nurse/attorney who could represent fellow nurses in malparactice cases, problems with facilities etc. If you haven't guessed already, I love to argue!
  2. by   Euskadi1946
    I graduated with an ADN 13 years ago and had thought at one time to go for a bsn, but nursing school burned me out so much that the thought of doing one more pathophys/term paper or what have you almost made want to heave. I've had 8 years of floor nursing experience and 5 years of being a healthcare coordinator with the State of Utah. Besides, ADN, BSN we all take the same state boards and make the same amount of money unless you work for the Government where the bsn does count....
  3. by   buddiage
    As stated, I would get a BSN only if I planned on getting an MSN.

    I must constantly evolve or I get bored, and maybe that'll change as I'm older. I will either go back to school for a BSN- MSN, or I'll be taking art, languages, or something horse related outside of college. I want to explore everything, if hubby can stomach it.
  4. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    As stated, I would get a BSN only if I planned on getting an MSN.
    Same here.

    Only reason why i'm wanting to go on for my masters eventually is to be able to teach someday. I have zero desire to be a DON or ADON ever, since i like the fact that when i'm off work, i'm OFF WORK.
    Last edit by Marie_LPN, RN on Oct 1, '06
  5. by   AuntieRN
    I have absolutely no desire to get my BSN either. It may be from shear laziness but I am 41 yo and just graduated with my ADN..I have no desire to be in management...did that already...no interest in administration....done that...just wanna be a nurse....thats all...I agree furthering your education should be a personal thing. Doesn't mean I am not willing to learn as everyday is a new learning experience. Just not interested in going back to school.
  6. by   tntrn
    Great thread and great responses. I got my ADN in 1976 and have never had the desire to get the BSN. The only way I have ever been able to tell who, among my co-workers, had BSN's or even MSN's) is when them feel they must make sure it is known. That is, to remind us on a frequent basis.

    Currently we have a BSN student doing a 3 month internship on our unit. She attends a private school in the area. She's sharp. I overheard her say to another student (this student was from a local community college and working for her ADN) that the Community College wouldn't accept her but the private school did and I found that to be most interesting. I suppose you could interpret that a million different ways.

    Lately, we were admonished by our working-on-a-BSN manager that in slow times we should be reading the journals and such, along with a lot of other things on the list. I find journal articles almost impossible to read and understand. They are so wordy, I've often wondered if they get paid by the word rather than content. To actually get to the meat of the topic, you must wade through piles and piles of rhetoric to the point that I get bored or frustrated before ever getting TO the point. I gave up my subscriptions to AJN, oh, maybe, 25 years ago. If getting a BSN would entail reading more of those, and I'm sure it would, or even worse, writing more of the same, no thank you.
  7. by   mamason
    I really don't think not wanting to persue our/your Bsn is LAZINESS. School is hard and takes much dedication. I for one am not willing to go through that process again. From most of the posts here I see that we are pretty much happy with our ADN or Diploma degrees. Some posts have even stated that you don't require a BSN or higher to move up the ladder if you wish to do so. The only thing that matters is the fact that we all feel that we are competent nurses and feel secure in the care that we are bestowing upon our pts. Plain and simple.:wink2:
  8. by   mamason
    My speller is off today!LOL! I meant pursue not persue!! LOL!
  9. by   kadokin
    Quote from nursing4me23
    hello all,

    i would like to know if there are any adn's out there who have no desire to get there bsn's. not because of laziness or not wanting knowledge or anything else negative, but just don't want to or feel its necessary because they don't want to be an admin or charge anything. or maybe you have other reasons. i feel there is so much pressure...rn to bsn..rn to bsn. geez adn's are just as effective or maybe sometimes more than a bsn. sure they get paid a little more but over 12 months the extra dollars don't seem worth it.

    so...am i alone in thinking this.

    i don't mean to offend the bsn's or anyone else. just curious.
    get paid a little more? where i am, bsn does not get one penny more than an adn/asn. and a job-change that i am contemplating (which prefers a bsn) would actuallly involve a pay cut. so don't pursue a higher degree thinking it will improve your situation financially unless you want to pursue an fnp or crna or some such. i am not even sure teaching will get you more pay. it is just too ironic. w/the time, energy, and $$ one can spend pursuing higher education, it just doesn't seem to pay, sometimes. and nursing isn't the only discipline that sees this phenomena. why? why? why?

    having said that, i am really glad i got my bsn. it was difficult, but i think it was worth it. and i, also, have worked w/many bsn's that are no more competent/caring than adn's and vice-versa.

    i think this is one of those debates that will outlive us all.

    i am just so thankful for all the nurses out there, at whatever educational level, that care enough to continue to do their jobs. where would mankind be w/out us? i ask you.

    we rock!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  10. by   kadokin
    Quote from tntrn
    Great thread and great responses. I got my ADN in 1976 and have never had the desire to get the BSN. The only way I have ever been able to tell who, among my co-workers, had BSN's or even MSN's) is when them feel they must make sure it is known. That is, to remind us on a frequent basis.

    Currently we have a BSN student doing a 3 month internship on our unit. She attends a private school in the area. She's sharp. I overheard her say to another student (this student was from a local community college and working for her ADN) that the Community College wouldn't accept her but the private school did and I found that to be most interesting. I suppose you could interpret that a million different ways.

    Lately, we were admonished by our working-on-a-BSN manager that in slow times we should be reading the journals and such, along with a lot of other things on the list. I find journal articles almost impossible to read and understand. They are so wordy, I've often wondered if they get paid by the word rather than content. To actually get to the meat of the topic, you must wade through piles and piles of rhetoric to the point that I get bored or frustrated before ever getting TO the point. I gave up my subscriptions to AJN, oh, maybe, 25 years ago. If getting a BSN would entail reading more of those, and I'm sure it would, or even worse, writing more of the same, no thank you.
    AMEN to that!

    From a BSN.
  11. by   anniem54
    I have had my ADN since 1992 and have never had any desire to go back for my BSN. I enjoy hands on bedside nursing and wouldn't touch a manager's position with a 30 foot pole. When I went to nursing school I lived in an area with both a 4 year BSN and a community college LVN to ADN RN program. I would have loved to go through the BSN program simply because I value education, but circumstances (young children, finances, time constraints) made ADN the best choice for me. I also already had a 4 year degree (Art, totally impractical but wonderful), and didn't feel the need to have a BSN for the sake of having a 4 year degree. I think everyone has to make the best choice for their circumstances, values, and needs. In an ideal world, I think all nurses would have a BSN, but in the REAL world, we have and will continue to have nurses from different educational backgrounds. What counts is that we respect each other's education and experience. I try to look at each nurse I work with as someone I can learn something from. We have LVN students in our facility and I find I learn things from them occasionally, or at least am reminded of things I've forgotten! Good luck to all the nursing students out there, whether you're in an ADN or BSN program. You've chosen a career that is consistently challenging, never ever boring, frequently frustrating, over the top stressful, and very satisfying!
  12. by   noc4senuf
    I am an ADN RN. When I finished school, I always thought i would go back. Raising kids and paying the bills didn't allow for that. Over the years I have climbed the ladder from a floor nurse, supervisor, manager, and now a DON all with an ADN. The people i have talked to over the years recognize my accomplishments as a nurse regardless of the degree. My salary is based on my abilities and not on a degree. I oversee 8 managers beneath me and 80 staff in the total nursing department. I keep up-to-date on state and federal regulations, confer with colleges on how to train future nurses, and can consult with the NP's and MD's while being treated with respect. Will i go back to school? Probably not, I am able to attain my status and careers with experience and not the degree.

    By the way, one of my best friends just completed a Masters degree in th last year and he is still being paid the same amount. The job offers he has had (even after being a nurse for many years) is less than what I am making.
  13. by   Dakkon76
    You've got to have a reason to get it, otherwise there's no point. Either you want to consider a management position later down the road, or you want to get into advanced practice... if you don't, then I don't see a reason to go.

    Although, I know a woman in her 50's who just went back to get her BSN because she injured her back on the job and she wants to get off the floor and into something she can handle... She's told me she wished she would have gotten it when she were younger, just because now she'd have it instead of having to continue to work on her unit until she finishes it and can finally move up.

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