Adn vs BSN vs Diploma, requirement to enter nursing? - page 2

Well, here goes, if anyone has read AJN for about the last year you would have seen the differing viewpoint articles and TON of reader responses about this subject. Basically it seems to be a huge... Read More

  1. by   Zinnia
    I started out decades ago as an LPN. I roomed with a 'college student' getting her BSN. I was already on the hospital floor taking BPs when she was still taking English classes. If there is a nursing shortage ,get them out there! But support continuing education.
    In a very few years I wanted my RN, so went to a community college and got my ADN. Passed the test. I am a good nurse. The BSN would only give me options for later when I can't keep up with the ICCU pace.
    So, as an ADN I can work as a nurse. I am just as good a care giver as a BSN. but fall short on some of the higher brow stuff.
    In another thread there was a nurse developing a research proposal, this is an LPN working towards her BSN in nursing! and she is way beyond me!
    So it depends where you want to go.
    If you want to be the boss of a floor,or audit charts be a BSN. I want to get my BSN because I think I would be a good teacher.
    But frankly ,ADNs take the same test as BSNs.......
    So....when time and money confine I would go for the ADN.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Allie well there is where you are wrong considering fully 60% of RN's practicing today are ADN grads. WHERE would you get them?
  3. by   meandragonbrett
    Is the cyber bar still around?
  4. by   Tweety
    Perhaps there should be a distiction between the RNs who have BSNs and the ADNs, if they take different boards. I wouldn't mind that, just as long as I can keep continuing doing what I'm doing. I would even allow them to be called RNs, and us ADNs or something like that. But make the boards different and the job descriptions different as well.



    ADNs make excellent bedside nurses, which initially is what they are intended to be, to ease the nursing shortage. It takes a lot of skill and knowledge to assess, treat and collaborate at the bedside and ADNs do that well. BSNs start out at the bedside as well, but their degree should allow them to move further up in administration, public health, teaching and research. If they need to be called registered nurses to do this it wouldn't bother me.

  5. by   Tweety
    Originally posted by 3rdShiftGuy
    Perhaps there should be a distiction between the RNs who have BSNs and the ADNs, if they take different boards. I wouldn't mind that, just as long as I can keep continuing doing what I'm doing. I would even allow them to be called RNs, and us ADNs or something like that. But make the boards different and the job descriptions different as well.



    ADNs make excellent bedside nurses, which initially is what they are intended to be, to ease the nursing shortage. It takes a lot of skill and knowledge to assess, treat and collaborate at the bedside and ADNs do that well. BSNs start out at the bedside as well, but their degree should allow them to move further up in administration, public health, teaching and research. If they need to be called registered nurses to do this it wouldn't bother me. But the nursing shortage is too acute not to continue with ADN education, IMHO.


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