ADN or BSN?

  1. Hi, my name is Teresa and I am a first year nursing student in a BSN program in Connecticut. Over the past couple of weeks, I have decided to transfer from my college to a school closer to home. In my searching, I discovered ADN programs at various community colleges and hospital programs. My question is whether or not going for the BSN track is better than the ADN or is the ADN good enough to become an RN? Will i be limited when I work in a hospital and how is the pay different? This summer I plan on taking a CNA course to get a feel for nursing even though I'm positive that this is what I want to do. Money really isn't a factor, but not having to pay college loans would be great. If anyone can offer any advice to me I would gladly appreciate it. thanks in advance!
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Redeye
    It all depends on what your long-term goals are. If you are interested in one day getting an advanced degree in nursing (i.e. nurse practitioner, nurse anesthetist, case mangagement) or if you plan to one day move into management, a BSN is the way to go. If none of that is important to you, then the ADN will serve you well.
  4. by   hollykate
    The age old question. first of all, of course an ADN is "good enough" to become an RN- currently, it is the entry level for the registry. My two cents, if you want to do an ADN program, go ahead, then when you are working, let the hospital pay for you to get a BSN- most have tuition reimbursement agreements.
  5. by   sa48sh
    Originally posted by teresab_2000:
    Hi, my name is Teresa and I am a first year nursing student in a BSN program in Connecticut. Over the past couple of weeks, I have decided to transfer from my college to a school closer to home. In my searching, I discovered ADN programs at various community colleges and hospital programs. My question is whether or not going for the BSN track is better than the ADN or is the ADN good enough to become an RN? Will i be limited when I work in a hospital and how is the pay different? This summer I plan on taking a CNA course to get a feel for nursing even though I'm positive that this is what I want to do. Money really isn't a factor, but not having to pay college loans would be great. If anyone can offer any advice to me I would gladly appreciate it. thanks in advance!
    Honey, The nursing profession is soooo short of people all you need to get a job these days is a BADGE that says RN. And their ain't much difference in the pay. But you'd better jump on the bandwagon soon, I hear from our administrators that they're not worried,because "there's always more nurses where you came from"

  6. by   TracyRN
    You only need a two-year degree to take the NCLEX, or licensing exam, for RN. LPN is a one-year course. In order to be accepted into the program, most schools require prerequisite classes plus a test administered thru the NLN (National League of Nursing). Most floor RNs you talk to have only an ADN. Those who seek higher education do so because they want to get out of floor nursing and into administration, teaching, etc. I have an ADN and will start on my BSN or MSN bridge within the next 1 to 2 years (when my husband is done with his MA).

    Education is definitely important for nurses but keep in mind that some of the best nurses you will have the honor to work with may hold the title of LPN with not even have a college degree to their name. Quality comes with experience and time invested.

    My advice? Get your ADN, work in acute care, preferably med-surg for at least a year and then decide where you want your future to lead. You may not even want a BSN but a BA in Admin. The advice to take advantage of employer tuition reimbursement is sound. Most acute care facilties in my general area offer 100% reimbursement for an "A."
  7. by   NurseTony
    If you're thinking about transfering, check out how many credits will transfer. If your current credits aren't going to shave any time off of an ADN, might as well go for the BSN. However, an ADN, will get you in to work, gain experience, and most places will reimburse your tuition to pursue a BSN. Additionally, there are many ADN to BSN programs that can take as little as 18 mos. So in effect you could have a BSN in 3.5 years with the ADN route, pay less, and gain more experience. Whatever you decide, never stop learning.
  8. by   LoriUSAFRN
    It's funny how long this educational requirement debate to be a RN has been going on! And nurses wonder why the profession is in such a mess! But anyway--

    I got my ADN, got a job, took boards then started work on my BSN all within four months. I really recommend this route to anybody. I felt that the real world experiences I was gaining at work helped me to be a better BSN student. I was able to combine academic theory with real world experiences, whereas a 'pure' BSN can go through four years of college and get out having a clue about what real nursing is all about. It's also handy as a new RN to have your professors to discuss work problems with.

    I still think ultimately the BSN should be the minimum education requirement, just because it is the standard for all other professions. But since the profession hasn't made up it's mind in the 17.5 years I've been practicing , I doubt they ever will.
  9. by   Navy Nurse
    I learned much more in my ADN program than my BSN program. Highly recommend ADN if not sure where you want to go in nursing. There is really little difference in pay and depending on where you are from no difference in jobs, because no matter how many fancy initial we have after our names, in the publics eye you are still "just a nurse"

    The Navy tried to seperate the "technical nurse (ADN)" vs professional nurse (BSN or higher) a few years back. What a nightmare that is still haunting us today. That is why now, you have to have BSN or higher to come into the Navy.
  10. by   teresab_2000
    I just wanted to thank everyone who has replied to my question. All of you offered me some really great advice. I'm still a bit confused on what I'm going to do, but I have applied to two different 4 year programs, one in a private school similiar to the school that I currently attend, and a public school where pre-reqs are taken in the first two years and nursing courses are taken in the last two. I think that I'm going to go for the private school option only because I would start nursing classes next year and that all of my classes are going to transfer to this school. Well, thanks everyone and if you can offer any more advice please feel free!!!

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