An ADN Degree is NOT a "2 year" Degree

  1. 0
    i've read yet another thread about the adn degree being "just a 2 year degree." i already have an as degree (with honors) and a ba degree. i know very well what the traditional "2 year" & "4 year" degrees are like...

    i will finish my adn degree in may '07 so i've been at this (adn) now for a few years and there simply is no way to compare an as with an adn so i suggest we correct this gross lack of understanding.

    when someone says “that’s a 2 year degree” tell them it is not.

    #1 the adn degree is not a “2 year degree” (not in california at least).

    #2 it’s just earned at a place that mostly handles 2 year degrees but an adn is more like a 3+ years degree full time.

    #3 with a previous ba, it will have taken me 3 years full time to earn my adn (and no i did not retake any classes or take a class that was not required).

    #4 you’d better hope there’s more to an adn degree than what’s involved for a typical as.

    to change things we need to correct misinformation so if someone thinks an adn degree is like a typical as degree, please do some effective “pt teaching!”

    regards,


    ken
  2. 14,181 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 14 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    The ADN program I attended was designed to do in two years. For example the first quarter (it was a quarter system) you took A&P, English, Pyschology and Nursing I..........and so on.

    Nowadays nursing schools know there's a waiting list, so now they require pre-reqs and stretch a 2-year degree into three. Many require A&P and other courses before even applying.

    I agree, we have strayed from the ADN from being "just a two-year degree".
  5. 0
    Same here. At my school there was a curriculum pre-designed for folks who wanted to try to get it all done in two years; prereqs and all. It could very well be done, with a LOT of time and hard work. For the majority of people though, it ended up being a three year degree, indeed. For me, it actually ended up being a FOUR year degree, due to the fact that in the middle of it all, I decided to get a teaching certificate to go along with my previous BA, instead.
  6. 0
    My program was designed to be completed in 2 full years as well. We went to class for 8 quarters, each twelve weeks long. During that time we basicly had like 10 days off at Christmas and 2 weeks at the end of the first year, which was mid May. It was and last I checked all inclusive, excepted students right out of high school. We actually had two ladies that graduated high school on Sunday and start nursing school on Tuesday- Monday was Memorial Day.

    Anyone is free to PM me if they would like additonal infomation.

    Rj
  7. 1
    Well, at risk of sounding like someone who's a little "slow", I'm going to confess that it took me a full FOUR YEARS to obtain my associate of applied science degree!!

    For one thing, I was an older student (mid-30s at the time) who'd been out of high school for many years; for another, I was a wife and mother of four; and for another, I needed a LOT of remedial work in math and science before I was even ready to take the NLN entrance exam! So no, the ADN is NOT a "two-year" degree; I spent two years just getting the pre-reqs and basic stuff out of the way so I could devote myself to the program when I finally got into it. I've never regretted doing it that way, either. But I agree, it's something of an insult when somebody says, "Oh, it's only a two-year degree........."
    Joaquin49 likes this.
  8. 0
    Marla, while I said my cirriculum could be done in two years, it took me five. So don't feel so bad. I worked full time, took one class at a time for three years, and then took the two year nursing.

    If you took Algerbra and Biology there were no "pre-reqs" so someone fresh from high school could take it. We had one women who came fresh out of high school and did in two years. She was the only one who took everything in two years. The rest of us had courses done prior, some like me had them all done, and others had some co-reqs to take.
  9. 0
    In my geographical area, there is such competition to get into the ADN program and since additional points are given for each pre-req/basic class already completed, you aren't even considered for entry into the program unless they are all completed.

    In fact, many of the students are completing their sciences and entering the LVN program, in order to get into the ADN program through the transition track. In some instances, LVN has become a pre-req.

    What I find frustrating, is that in addition to the "public" not realizing all the hard work that is required to achieve an ADN/ASN, neither do fellow nurses; nurses who went to school a long time ago when the competition wasn't so tough and you could enter literally straight out of HS and generic student bachelor prepared nurses.

    There is a lot greater competition to get into the ADN programs vs. BSN in my area. So, in light of the fact that the only difference in entry was simply another year's worth of basics, my decision was made to pursue the BSN.

    I think we need to better educate the public about our (nurses) qualifications and the duties we perform. In addition, we also need to become more informed in regards to our fellow colleagues' hard work and accomplishments within our own profession.
  10. 0
    Quote from Kelly_the_Great
    I think we need to better educate the public about our (nurses) qualifications and the duties we perform. In addition, we also need to become more informed in regards to our fellow colleagues' hard work and accomplishments within our own profession.
    I agree with both points you mention, Kelly_the_Great, particularly the later. The further I get into Nursing the more I am blown away by the complexity of critical thinking skills necessary and the mental, emotional & physical demands of this profession.
  11. 1
    Quote from rjflyn
    My program was designed to be completed in 2 full years as well.
    Interesting. I looked into ADN (and BSN) programs in Texas, California and Washington and while my search was limited to geographical areas in those states and thus was not exhaustive, I did not find any ADN programs that didn't require Anatomy, Physiology, Microbiology, etc BEFORE being able to even apply to the ADN programs.

    Once admitted to our ADN program it is 4 semesters full time of nursing classes only.

    In addition to the 4 semesters of nursing classes we are required to have the basics for an AS degree (English, Algebra, Political Science, Psychology, etc) as well as ADN required prereqs of Nutrition, Public Speaking, Anatomy, Physiology, and Microbiology. Again, these are in addition to the two years of nursing classes.

    So, at least currently in California, it is completely impossible to get an ADN degree in less than 3 years full time and that is if you work really, really hard and are very, very fortunate to get into the classes you need.
    Joaquin49 likes this.
  12. 0
    Quote from West_Coast_Ken
    The further I get into Nursing the more I am blown away by the complexity of critical thinking skills necessary and the mental, emotional & physical demands of this profession.
    Hang in there, :icon_hug:

    Hey, you know what's really great? Maybe your sense of being "blown away" is really just a greater sense of appreciation..?

    With this perspective, you will have the insight not only to advocate for your patients (as I'm sure you're being taught to do) but will also understand the need to advocate for your fellow nurses (regardless of their path) (which I'm sure you're not being taught to do).

    Congratulations!


Top