Acls

  1. Any helpful hints on how to study for ACLS? I am the most worried about the mega code, I have heard lots of horror stories about it.
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   kcalohagirl
    The mega-code wasn't as bad as I thought it would be. The instructors were very supportive when I took it. Thew weren't there to try to fail you. If you know the stuff that is on the pre-test backwards and forwards and pay attention in class, I think you should be okay.

    Good luck. It was a fairly enjoyable couple of days.
  4. by   TazziRN
    Don't worry about it. The mega codes used to be bad enough to cause anyone to have grey hairs and sleepless nights, but those were the days when the instructors did what they could to fail you. Nowadays it's the exact opposite.....you can use the little flip book in both the megacodes and the written test....the idea is that whatever you would actually have at your disposal during a code to refer to, you can use during the course and test. The old megacodes also were done with either each student alone or paired with another student, and you were in a room alone with the tester. Now you do it in groups and you can help each other out.

    RELAX!!!
  5. by   zacarias
    Yeah I guess in days past ACLS was hard but now adays, ACLS is pretty easy. If you like, go to a bookstore and buy an ACLS book just for review prior to the course/mega code. You will do fine.
  6. by   deb123
    Is ACLS usually offered by hospitals? I am looking for my first RN job so I don't know. If I take the course, which I believe is only 2 days or something, will it help me get a job?
  7. by   gonzo1
    One way to feel good about the class is to get an acls book and read it before you go. most people don't do this, but i did. The courses now days are set up more as a learning class, than a chance to fail you out. the instructors will help you learn all you need to know, and will even work with you after class if you are having a hard time with something. having acls will be a bonus when you are job hunting, but it is a tiny part of what recruiters are looking for so don't put to much emphasis on that. most jobs expect that they will have to send new employees to acls class.
  8. by   burn out
    Your hospital should provide you with the ACLs book. In 2005 ACLS was overhauled and many changes were made both in the pulseless vtach algorhythim (sp?) During mega code it is no longer required to intubate but focus is placed on maintaining a patent airway with bag /mouth ventilation. There is now a 2 minute method to the madness which I think we will see more success in survival rates if we embrace this idea and actually will use it in real life situations. I have not seen it used in real life in the hospital or by our local paramedics yet. Probably the biggest change has occurred in resusci ANNIE. She now will talk to you, has an actual pulse and actually breaths, she has veins that you can actually stick. We were computor monitored during the mega code and provided with immediate feedback on a television screen after our experience. All in all it was quite fun and very informative..a great learning expereince.
  9. by   MARIAN202


    2006 acls foundation facts




    understanding your roles:
    • whether you are a team member or team leader during a resuscitation attempt, you should understand not only your role but also the roles of other team members on your team. this awareness will help you anticipate:
      • what actions will be performed next
      • how to communicate and work as a member or leader of the team
    Last edit by sirI on Jan 29, '07 : Reason: copyright
  10. by   PHM
    Not sure where you're taking your ACLS but our facility provides you with a book complete with the CD. Unlike previous classes where most didn't even pickup a book or fill out the pretest given to them when they signed up, it's different now (at least for us).

    We pick the book up BEFORE class (up to about a month before), and are REQUIRED to have completed the written pretest and the two activities on the CD (bring printed completion CD test to class). ACLS book is much easier than previous editions and algorythms are actually a bit easier to digest. Meds are simpler and the whole routine is geared toward common sense important actions that we can initially provide. Without too much verbage the book often points out to rationale why they changed this or that.

    Just read the book, do the CD and have a little confidence. Afterall, as someone mentioned, your preparation will probably have you at least a good way ahead of the remainder in class.

    And . . .good luck.
    Last edit by sirI on Jan 29, '07 : Reason: quoted heavily edited post
  11. by   chip193
    I just taught the new ACLS for the first time today. It was all video based - just stood there and pressed play.

    About 1/3 of the class is CPR. Know your 30:2 and "harder, deeper, faster" (and yes, that's what we were told in our instructor updates!).

    Make sure you do the pretests and read the book. There isn't much teaching that goes on in class now, so you really need to have at least a basic knowledge of things.

    I was surprised to see ECG rhythms on the exam again. It was a nice surprise.

    Good luck!

    Chip
  12. by   Christie RN2006
    Luckily I just took an EKG class, so those shouldn't be bad at all. Any helpful hints on how to remember things such as what meds to give when and how much to give and other things like that? Are there any specific areas of content that I really need to focus on?

    I went to the hospital and picked up my ACLS book today, we just get to borrow them, they don't actually let us keep them
  13. by   chip193
    Quote from Christie RN2006
    Luckily I just took an EKG class, so those shouldn't be bad at all. Any helpful hints on how to remember things such as what meds to give when and how much to give and other things like that? Are there any specific areas of content that I really need to focus on?

    I went to the hospital and picked up my ACLS book today, we just get to borrow them, they don't actually let us keep them
    Do the exact opposite of what you have just suggested. Learn what the drugs are and what they do - not what drug you use for "x" condition.

    For example:

    Atropine speeds heart rate in the atria by blocking the vagus nerve.

    NOT

    The heart rate is slow so I need to give atropine.

    It may seem a bit of semantics, but, by learning it this way, you'll never fall into the trap of giving an anti-dysthythmic for 3AVB or atropine for a high level AVB.

    Good luck!

    Chip
  14. by   katienj
    http://www.cprassociate.com/aclspretest.php
    Here is a pretest that I found very helpful with ACLS. I have enjoyed the class each time I took it.

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