Accident Scenes: Do You Always Offer Assistance? - page 5

Had an interesting experience when I took my sister and BIL to Portland International this morning: as I was pulling into the terminal, we saw a woman lying on the ground with several people standing... Read More

  1. by   teeituptom
    I carry no supplies at all in my car
    except my golf clubs

    And I do not stop to render aid anymore
  2. by   mattsmom81
    The Good Sam Law (in my state) may protect us somewhat but can be overturned if we accept a reward or payment for professional services, then we will be held under higher scrutiny. A famous case here in Texas which is used in legal seminars is the nurse who allowed family members to pay for cleaning of her uniform soiled while assisting at an accident scene. She was succesfully sued later for some attorney concocted lapse in professional duty at the accident scene. It involved less than perfect immobilization of a fractue and apparently the attorney proved harm was caused by her negligence. So...be careful out there nurses.

    We must know we take a risk if we stop but we do have to follow our own consciences and live with ourselves if we walk away too. I tend to leave accident rescue to the professional EMS and police whenever I can personally. Not to say I haven't helped, but I am cautious.
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Jul 7, '04
  3. by   LadyBugLass
    Quote from teeituptom
    I carry no supplies at all in my car
    except my golf clubs

    And I do not stop to render aid anymore
    What if I passed out on the golf course and my body was in your way?
  4. by   LadyBugLass
    Quote from mattsmom81
    The Good Sam Law (in my state) may protect us somewhat but can be overturned if we accept a reward or payment for professional services, then we will be held under higher scrutiny. A famous case here in Texas which is used in legal seminars is the nurse who allowed family members to pay for cleaning of her uniform soiled while assisting at an accident scene. She was succesfully sued later for some attorney concocted lapse in professional duty at the accident scene. It involved less than perfect immobilization of a fractue and apparently the attorney proved harm was caused by her negligence. So...be careful out there nurses.

    We must know we take a risk if we stop but we do have to follow our own consciences and live with ourselves if we walk away too. I tend to leave accident rescue to the professional EMS and police whenever I can personally. Not to say I haven't helped, but I am cautious.
    OUCH!! What a crappy thing to do!! What kind of judge/jury could sleep at night after that? And how badly did she immobilize that arm? It was most likely so badly mangled so in the first place, no matter what a bystander did, it would have lost some function anyways!
  5. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from LadyBugLass
    OUCH!! What a crappy thing to do!! What kind of judge/jury could sleep at night after that? And how badly did she immobilize that arm? It was most likely so badly mangled so in the first place, no matter what a bystander did, it would have lost some function anyways!
    I agree, a very crappy thing to do - I don't see how anyone involved in that case slept at night.

    judge - shame on him/her for not throwing out the case
    family/victim - how dare they sue someone for trying to help
    attorney who took their case - :angryfire
    jury - :angryfire :angryfire It is one thing to try to get money for greedy a-holes, it is another thing entirely to hand it over to them...and out of the hands of someone who was trying to help.
  6. by   Katnip
    The thing is, it does happen, and it happens more often that we know. It's sad, but true.

    Just because you don't stop at every accident doesn't mean you aren't a nice person.
  7. by   MelissaRN
    I came across an accident this morning on my way to work, it was on a busy interstate and there were about 6 cars lined up to give assistance. I did not stop because there were already a lot of people around and I knew that EMS was less than a mile away. I did however call 911 to make sure that someone had called. I was able to give them the exact location of the accident which the previous caller wasn't able to give. I was reasured that EMS was enroute. The person in the accident was going to be in good hands. I wouldn't have been able to do anything as I didn't have any equipment with me and no backboard in my trunk. As it was there were a lot of people milling around on this busy highway and I was concerned that they were putting their own lives in danger by the way they were parked and running back and forth across the road.
  8. by   mscsrjhm
    Quote from teeituptom
    I carry no supplies at all in my car
    Quote from teeituptom
    except my golf clubs

    And I do not stop to render aid anymore


    With amused affection, I am not surprised. You have very definite opinions, and the liberal "help all at all cost" just doesn't seem like you. (I agree)
    I am soooo chuckling while I write this.
    Reminded of a golf joke:
    Man came home from goling, wife asks how was the game? Man said terrible, Jack had a heartattack. wife said, oh no, how awful for you, Man said
    "Yeah, it was 'hit the ball and drag Jack', 'hit the ball and drag Jack".
  9. by   mscsrjhm
    Quote from mattsmom81
    The Good Sam Law (in my state) may protect us somewhat but can be overturned if we accept a reward or payment for professional services, then we will be held under higher scrutiny. A famous case here in Texas which is used in legal seminars is the nurse who allowed family members to pay for cleaning of her uniform soiled while assisting at an accident scene. She was succesfully sued later for some attorney concocted lapse in professional duty at the accident scene. It involved less than perfect immobilization of a fractue and apparently the attorney proved harm was caused by her negligence. So...be careful out there nurses.
    Quote from mattsmom81

    We must know we take a risk if we stop but we do have to follow our own consciences and live with ourselves if we walk away too. I tend to leave accident rescue to the professional EMS and police whenever I can personally. Not to say I haven't helped, but I am cautious.


    They tell us alot of things in nursing seminars. You are right, gotta think for yourself.
  10. by   hypnotic_nurse
    The only ones I stop to help are the barking, meowing, tweeting variety of accident victims (and actually, those are the only kind I've ever run across).
  11. by   teeituptom
    Quote from LadyBugLass
    What if I passed out on the golf course and my body was in your way?

    By the rules of golf I could take a drop and play a round you
  12. by   ICUnowOHN
    I always stop. I can't NOT stop. And it seems like I'm always right in the right place at the wrong time. I have begun carrying a "JumpKit" with me in my car. I have had cars flip end over end across the median and land in front of me. I have had a van with a 30 foot trailer attached, roll and slide across 3 lanes of interstate right in front of me. I was the first one that stopped that had any medical training. I just provide the best care I can until the 'medics arrive. I never enter a scene that isn't safe, I have a wife and 3 kids to consider. I don't usually stop if there is already EMS/Fire Rescue there. I sometimes ask if they need any more help. I would hope someone would stop for me if I needed help. I don't do anything beyond my scope of training, and I have my own liability coverage. That may not be enough protection, but, I can't NOT help. I'm a nurse. It's not just a job, it's who I am.
  13. by   RN4NICU
    I see by the wife/kids reference, you're also a man. That protects you a little (but not completely). We had a problem in the area a few years back with staged "accidents" used to lure abduction victims...they were abducted by the "victims" of the apparent accident when they stopped to help. These people were later found dead - raped, mutilated, etc. The local news media was urging citizens to call 911 and move on when coming across an accident scene. Unfortunately, sickos are more and more common these days.

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