Absurd medical abbreviations

  1. 1
    What is the worst you have seen?I think mine is , as a new nurse I saw an order for LOC PRN. I'm thinking level of consciousness as needed??? Turned out doc meant lazative of choice !:chuckle
    jeninthedesert likes this.
  2. 4,181 Visits
    Find Similar Topics
  3. 12 Comments so far...

  4. 8
    When I worked in the ER, we had a running joke. A long time ago a rather uneducated fellow came into the ER. When asked what he needed to be seen for, the patient said "MY TOOTH BE ****** UP!" The guy who checked him in is a bit of a joker and this was back in the day when we still wrote patient name/complaints on the white board. Anyway, he put the patient's last name and chief complaint as "MTBFU." I'm not sure when exactly it happened, but our MDs started referring to tooth complaints as MTBFU. One day, we had a resident doing their off-service rotation through the ER and actually wrote "MTBFU" as a diagnosis on a chart. Imagine explaining that to our manager when the coders were trying to figure out what "MTBFU" was in the ICD-9!!!
    Last edit by Elvish on Jan 6, '09 : Reason: TOS
  5. 2
    Quote from c0ntagion
    When I worked in the ER, we had a running joke. A long time ago a rather uneducated fellow came into the ER. When asked what he needed to be seen for, the patient said "MY TOOTH BE ****** UP!" The guy who checked him in is a bit of a joker and this was back in the day when we still wrote patient name/complaints on the white board. Anyway, he put the patient's last name and chief complaint as "MTBFU." I'm not sure when exactly it happened, but our MDs started referring to tooth complaints as MTBFU. One day, we had a resident doing their off-service rotation through the ER and actually wrote "MTBFU" as a diagnosis on a chart. Imagine explaining that to our manager when the coders were trying to figure out what "MTBFU" was in the ICD-9!!!
    OMG, I rarely, truly, LOL, but this did it!
    Last edit by Elvish on Jan 6, '09 : Reason: editing quoted post
    HonestRN and kythe like this.
  6. 0
    We had a resident admit a patient with the annotation "not for NS" - normal saline? Nursing services? Net stockings? Nylon suspenders? (We were getting desperate!)
    Necropsy. Of course!

    PS I work in acute care and the patient was remotely that ill. In the event that he did unexpectedly die we'd probably need to know he didn't want to be autopsied, so using an abbreviation - brillaint plan. And an unusual one? Genius!
  7. 0
    Quote from c0ntagion
    I'm not sure when exactly it happened, but our MDs started referring to tooth complaints as MTBFU. One day, we had a resident doing their off-service rotation through the ER and actually wrote "MTBFU" as a diagnosis on a chart. Imagine explaining that to our manager when the coders were trying to figure out what "MTBFU" was in the ICD-9!!!
    HAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!

    Thank you for sharing!

    Best,

    Southern
  8. 0
    Quote from talaxandra
    We had a resident admit a patient with the annotation "not for NS" - normal saline? Nursing services? Net stockings? Nylon suspenders? (We were getting desperate!)
    Necropsy. Of course!

    PS I work in acute care and the patient was remotely that ill. In the event that he did unexpectedly die we'd probably need to know he didn't want to be autopsied, so using an abbreviation - brillaint plan. And an unusual one? Genius!

    I thought necropsy was the autopsying of an animal?
  9. 0
    At the local hospital, instead of FSBS (finger stick blood sugar) they say/write/use BGs(Blood Glucoses). I had to explain to another nurse what I meant when I wrote BG at my new facility, and she said when she was in school they said CBG. (capillary blood glucose).

    Why can't we just make it easy and say BS for blood sugar??? ha ha!
  10. 0
    Quote from nightmare
    I thought necropsy was the autopsying of an animal?
    From About.com (Veterinary Medicine section):
    By Janet Tobiassen Crosby, DVM, About.com
    Definition: The term necropsy refers to an examination of a body, postmortem (after death), to determine the cause of death or illness. In vet school, we were taught that this term refers to postmortem examinations on animals, versus an autopsy, which is an examination of "self". Since you can't do an examination (or anything!) postmortem, a human examining a human cadaver was said to be doing an autopsy. A human doing a examination on an animal cadaver was said to be doing a necropsy.
    In checking with several current online dictionary sources1 through dictionary.com, I see that necropsy and autopsy are used interchangeably.
  11. 1
    In the UK we use BM for blood sugar.I think it stemmed from Bolringer Manheim the company that made the test strips but I know what you guys across the pond use BM for!!
    Elvish likes this.
  12. 0
    I once had a order that said "Instill 5 ml NS before Sx." I knew NS was normal saline, but instilling it before symptoms made no sense. Turns out Sx stood for suction.

    I hate abbreviations.


Top