about what % of CNA's have back injuries?

  1. 0
    I'm taking a class to become a CNA and I think I'll work as one for a few years while I move up the waiting list for the nursing degree I'm considering. I know back injuries are a problem for the health field, and I was wondering if anyone knew any statistics for CNA's and back related injuries. Also, do you believe most injuries occur due to inadequate training, rushing, not having another person to help or practicing poor body mechanics? Or, does body mechanics seem to not reflect the amount of back injuries seen? Thanks for any comments!
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  4. 24 Comments so far...

  5. 0
    Quote from michelle_d
    Or, does body mechanics seem to not reflect the amount of back injuries seen?
    The injury rate is somewhere between 99.5% and 100%

    Studies show that body mechanics is not a primary factor in back injury rates. No amount of body mechanics is going to allow a 115 pound person to transfer, bathe, clothe, turn, and reposition a 350 pound client.

    To help prevent injuries, make sure you have the right equipment and/or the right amount of people for the job. You may or may not be able to do this, depending on where you work.
  6. 1
    agree witht the previous post. I was working in a LTC, was with another aid and the patient was in a lift and we moved him up in bed, and I pull a muscle in my back. Even with the lift and the help of another aid, it doesnt make up for the fact that the patient was 500+ pounds. I know that some hospitals have lift teams, but as long as there are super morbidly obese then there will be back injuries.
    KimberlyRN89 likes this.
  7. 0
    Quote from ivanaBEEaRN
    but as long as there are super morbidly obese then there will be back injuries.
    I find I never get hurt with the heavy ones. I use the equipment and get the help.

    It's the little ones that get me! Especially younger male hemiplegics. You have them on the edge of bed or toilet and they forget and stand up and reach for something or try to start walking. If you reflexively try to hold them up, you are gonna get it.
  8. 0
    Strangely enough, I have met more nurses with back injuries than CNAs. I believe more nurses stay in the line of work after injury than CNAs. I do not think that all injuries are preventable. Even if you follow all the rules for prevention, there is going to be that one time when the patient makes an unexpected move and there you are. It has happened to me and I am certain to many others.
  9. 0
    I've known a lot of aides and must admit I know relatively few with serious back problems.

    Have I pulled a back muscle before? Sure, but then I've done that sleeping as well.

    Exercise (especially weights, even if minimal) and stretching before and after work will significantly minimize the chances of getting hurt.

    Common sense will help even more than exercise. I lift weights. Sure I CAN pick up a 250lb patient. Will I? HECK NO!

    Remember, most job descriptions state you must be able to lift 50-75 lbs of weight. Anything over that requires proper equipment.
  10. 0
    Sometimes there is no equipment I work in an ALF so we don't have hoyer lift or gait belts. Trying to lift 400 lbs of dead weight with just one other person does take its toll over time...
  11. 0
    Thanks guys. Eh, kinda depressing. Anyway, I just wanted to clarify that when I mean back injury I'm talking about something that's permanent. So I'm not as concerned over a sprained muscle as I am over having chronic back pain. I remember my mother saying that when she did her clinicals (for OT) her boss had to walk with a cane and couldn't climb stairs because of her back.
  12. 0
    Quote from miiszkim0711
    Sometimes there is no equipment I work in an ALF so we don't have hoyer lift or gait belts. Trying to lift 400 lbs of dead weight with just one other person does take its toll over time...
    You are your patients advocate. If your patient gets hurt because 2 of you are lifting them you will catch the heat for it.
  13. 0
    some of you are talking about lifting obese people with only one other person to help. I asked one of my professors about this and she told me to always ask for more help if I need it. And she implied that if I couldn't get it, I shouldn't work there. Anyone else take this stand on things?

    edited for a typo. lol.
    Last edit by michelle_d on Jan 27, '10 : Reason: typo


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