ABG question

  1. I am doing research for my next essay which includes looking at arterial blood gassess, and in the US articles I have found they speak of Pao2 and PaCo2 in mmHG, In the UK we speak of them in terms of KPA, so the UK normal range for oxygen is 11-14 KPA where as the US one looks to be around 80-100 mmHg.

    Does anyone know a conversion for mmHG to KPA? ideally one that is referenceable, such as on a web page or in a journal??

    Whisper
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   suzanne4
    Checked with my students over here in Thailand, and they use the same system that we use in the US. I couldn't find it in any of my things here, sorry......................
  4. by   gwenith
    The UK is more correct because KPa is the universal standard of pressure measurement - actually there was some talk some time aboo about converting everything including Sphigmo's to KPa - can you imagine the confusion

    I did a search for kilopascals and came up with this site which lists everything BUT that particular conversion lol

    http://www.buildingcatalogue.com.au/...onfactors.html
    You can work it out by working the intermediate steps of Kpa - Millibars - millimeters mercury

    This is an automatic converter

    http://www.alixta.com/converter/index.htm

    hope they help
  5. by   Whisper
    Thanks for the links, they were interesting. I had the great idea of doing my essay on ABG and the amount of articles is under whelming, my university likes it if we use primarily UK then Australian then European resources (because of the similarity in health care systems) and I am using US articles because I couldn't find that many others, and then I noticed the difference in measurements!!

    I have been told of a conversion chart that may exist in J.A.N. so I am going to sit and trawl through all my universities hard copies!
  6. by   Silverdragon102
    whisper,
    I think I might have an article somewhere at home on ABG's will check it out for you and let you know
    Anna
  7. by   Whisper
    Thanks I'd really appreciate it, I am giving myself to Sunday and then If I don't have enough articles I am going to have pick another topic!
  8. by   Silverdragon102
    Hi Whisper
    Sorry but the article I have I got from the intranet where I used to work and sadly it does not have any referencing
    Will have another check and see what I can find for you
    Anna
  9. by   PJMommy
    1 kilopascal = 7.5 mmHg

    Found this at: http://www.bergen.org/ACADEMY/Bio/PC...iablepg10.html
  10. by   Whisper
    Thanks for all you help, after harrassing/ I mean consulting with my supervisor I have managed to find a suitable reference for converting mmHg to KPa

    mmhg x 133.322=pa
    pa x 1000=kpa

    This is from Martin EA (2003)(ed) Oxford Minidictionary for Nurses. Oxford University Press. Oxford. United Kingdom


    I posted this here, incase anyone else will find it useful, as the cross pond differences drive me nuts! I just spent about three hours looking up what ITU stood for... why we can't all use the same abreviations I'll never know!!!

    Whisper
  11. by   Palpitations
    I was never any good at chemistry, but I think that this web page can help you.

    http://dbhs.wvusd.k12.ca.us/webdocs/...nversions.html

    Melinda

    Quote from Whisper
    Thanks for all you help, after harrassing/ I mean consulting with my supervisor I have managed to find a suitable reference for converting mmHg to KPa

    mmhg x 133.322=pa
    pa x 1000=kpa

    This is from Martin EA (2003)(ed) Oxford Minidictionary for Nurses. Oxford University Press. Oxford. United Kingdom


    I posted this here, incase anyone else will find it useful, as the cross pond differences drive me nuts! I just spent about three hours looking up what ITU stood for... why we can't all use the same abreviations I'll never know!!!

    Whisper
  12. by   Palpitations
    http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/mltr/presentations/ABG's-Interpret.html
  13. by   psychomachia
    Quote from Whisper
    I am doing research for my next essay which includes looking at arterial blood gassess, and in the US articles I have found they speak of Pao2 and PaCo2 in mmHG, In the UK we speak of them in terms of KPA, so the UK normal range for oxygen is 11-14 KPA where as the US one looks to be around 80-100 mmHg.

    Does anyone know a conversion for mmHG to KPA? ideally one that is referenceable, such as on a web page or in a journal??

    Whisper
    http://www.pharmacology2000.com/phys...onversions.htm
  14. by   zeer.w
    :chucklein lebanon, we also express the ABG's in mmhg, as in the US

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