A random thing that irks me A random thing that irks me - pg.2 | allnurses

A random thing that irks me - page 3

it really irks me when schools post clerical jobs that state, "act as school nurse when required." it offends me that whoever wrote that thinks it is just something anyone can do. :mad:... Read More

  1. Visit  klone profile page
    #13 1
    Quote from GaMBA
    I've done it for about 2 years (the upcoming school yr will be my 3rd yr) and must say that I don't see the big deal about a non-nurse filling in for the school nurse as a sub.
    The issue is less about filling in, and more about calling the substitute a "nurse." Unless you are a nurse, you should not be called a nurse.
  2. Visit  GaMBA profile page
    #14 1
    Something that reads "acts as the school nurse when required" is not calling anyone a "nurse." No one who is not a nurse is being labeled as one. Therefore, I don't see the big deal in a job description listing that statement. That is what they need. Someone who can perform the school nurse's duties if necessary. As a clinic sub I certainly don't call myself the school nurse and neither does anyone else. I don't think the secretary or office admin refer to themselves as nurses either if they have to fill in during the nurse's absence. The words in the OP are just a summarized role description, and I think the statement does a pretty good job of describing the role by using the words "act as", meaning perform the same functions that the school nurse would if s/he were here.

    It would be different if the wording were "be the school nurse. You are the nurse." Then I could understand the hissy fits about the description wording if it were intended for non-nurses. But as its currently stated in the OP, I don't see the big deal. *shrug*
  3. Visit  GaMBA profile page
    #15 0
    "Practicing nursing without a license is a crime plain and simple."

    I'd also like to point out that in no way does saying someone needs to "act as the school nurse when required" mean someone will be practicing nursing without a license or committing some crime. It is not a crime to run the school clinic in the absence of the school nurse. The nurse typically runs the clinic. If s/he is gone, someone else will need to do it. It doesn't have to be a nurse. What do you call that? To put it succinctly, you say "act as school nurse when required." You run the clinic if you need to. You're not the nurse, you're not practicing as one without a license, you're not going around calling yourself an RN or NP or LPN or anything. You are simply serving as a substitute for the person who normally does this job. No. big. deal.
  4. Visit  klone profile page
    #16 3
    I just think the wording was poor and could be better. Something like...

    "Fill in with basic first aid when the school nurse is not available."

    That way, nobody is ACTING as a nurse without a license.

    I bet that if, in the course of my hospital job, I told people that I am "acting as the doctor" when she's not around, I'd probably get in a heap of hot water.

    To act in a role implies that you're doing all the things required of that role, and a non-licensed person should not have the same responsibilities as a licensed healthcare provider.
    Last edit by klone on Jul 2, '10
  5. Visit  RescueNinja profile page
    #17 1
    Quote from GaMBA
    "Practicing nursing without a license is a crime plain and simple."

    I'd also like to point out that in no way does saying someone needs to "act as the school nurse when required" mean someone will be practicing nursing without a license or committing some crime. It is not a crime to run the school clinic in the absence of the school nurse. The nurse typically runs the clinic. If s/he is gone, someone else will need to do it. It doesn't have to be a nurse. What do you call that? To put it succinctly, you say "act as school nurse when required." You run the clinic if you need to. You're not the nurse, you're not practicing as one without a license, you're not going around calling yourself an RN or NP or LPN or anything. You are simply serving as a substitute for the person who normally does this job. No. big. deal.
    If it doesn't have to be a nurse running the clinic why is there a nurse in the first place?

    I feel that it would be better said as I posted earlier - something along the lines of "may need to provide ____ as required." We earned the right to call ourselves nurses and it is something I am very proud of. I agree with you that since it says "act as" it doesn't mean that person is a nurse. However, it does put them into a nursing role...to me that is not okay and it is a big deal.
  6. Visit  VioletKaliLPN profile page
    #18 0
    I am just begining my nursing education. I did not realize that there was a problem with non-nurses being referred to as nurses, I have never dealt with this situation. Certainly at my Internist's office there are MAs, LPNs, and RNs, but their title is clearly placed ona name tag.

    At the ALF I work at, dietary wears a specific uniform, not scrubs, and CNA's wear black scrub pants and a 'facility shirt'.(With logo and design) Only the LPNs and RNs wear scrubs.

    I wonder if this practice should be widespread in order to keep confusion from occuring.

    Housekeeping could wear scrub pants and a 'hospital logo' shirt. Rambling..
  7. Visit  klone profile page
    #19 0
    Quote from VioletKali
    I am just begining my nursing education. I did not realize that there was a problem with non-nurses being referred to as nurses, I have never dealt with this situation. Certainly at my Internist's office there are MAs, LPNs, and RNs, but their title is clearly placed ona name tag.

    At the ALF I work at, dietary wears a specific uniform, not scrubs, and CNA's wear black scrub pants and a 'facility shirt'.(With logo and design) Only the LPNs and RNs wear scrubs.

    I wonder if this practice should be widespread in order to keep confusion from occuring.

    Housekeeping could wear scrub pants and a 'hospital logo' shirt. Rambling..
    A lot of facilities do that. The university hospital I work at, every area is color coded. RNs wear one color top, CNAs a different color, pharmacy, RT, radiology, etc.
  8. Visit  nyteshade profile page
    #20 3
    Quote from gamba
    "practicing nursing without a license is a crime plain and simple."

    i'd also like to point out that in no way does saying someone needs to "act as the school nurse when required" mean someone will be practicing nursing without a license or committing some crime. it is not a crime to run the school clinic in the absence of the school nurse. the nurse typically runs the clinic. if s/he is gone, someone else will need to do it. it doesn't have to be a nurse. what do you call that? to put it succinctly, you say "act as school nurse when required." you run the clinic if you need to. you're not the nurse, you're not practicing as one without a license, you're not going around calling yourself an rn or np or lpn or anything. you are simply serving as a substitute for the person who normally does this job. no. big. deal.
    once again, if a school has its protocols in place as to how they will address days when the school nurse is gone that is one thing.

    this is not about what you do. this is not about just running the clinic for the day. this is about the overall scope of nursing practice.

    you are failing to see that it is not ok to "act as" the licensed nurse. why is it ok to "act as" the school nurse? does a nurse not have a governing body to answer to? does a nurse not carry a legal responsibility to his/her patients? is there no reason why a good portion of us carry malpractice insurance? i'm sure the tone would change if a job ad stated to act as a doctor, lawyer, pa, np, etc when required.

    if you have ever read your states nurse practice act you will see why so many of us are making "a big deal".

    stepping off my soapbox now.
  9. Visit  whodatnurse profile page
    #21 1
    Blame pop culture! That ad was written by a Gleek.


  10. Visit  Bubbles profile page
    #22 0
    [QUOTE=VioletKali;4392748]I am just begining my nursing education. I did not realize that there was a problem with non-nurses being referred to as nurses, I have never dealt with this situation. Certainly at my Internist's office there are MAs, LPNs, and RNs, but their title is clearly placed ona name tag.

    It is a problem when individuals either represent themselves as 'nurses' or when they are called 'nurses' by an employer such as a physician. It is misleading to the public! In my state it is against the law for anyone who is not either an RN or a LPN to be called a 'nurse.'
  11. Visit  Bubbles profile page
    #23 2
    Quote from GaMBA
    Something that reads "acts as the school nurse when required" is not calling anyone a "nurse." No one who is not a nurse is being labeled as one. Therefore, I don't see the big deal in a job description listing that statement. That is what they need. Someone who can perform the school nurse's duties if necessary. As a clinic sub I certainly don't call myself the school nurse and neither does anyone else. I don't think the secretary or office admin refer to themselves as nurses either if they have to fill in during the nurse's absence. The words in the OP are just a summarized role description, and I think the statement does a pretty good job of describing the role by using the words "act as", meaning perform the same functions that the school nurse would if s/he were here.

    It would be different if the wording were "be the school nurse. You are the nurse." Then I could understand the hissy fits about the description wording if it were intended for non-nurses. But as its currently stated in the OP, I don't see the big deal. *shrug*
    It appears that GaMBA is just not getting it! I appreciate how professional my fellow nurses have been and how you have attempted to explain it to GaMBA, but this is really annoying! How about if an airline had a job description that stated the persons who clean the planes between flights would 'act as the pilot' would you like to fly on that plane? Or someone else suggested how about if a nurse would be required to 'act as a physician'?

    What GaMBA does not seem to understand is that nursing is a profession with a body of knowledge and anyone who attempts 'to act as a nurse' without nursing knowledge is putting others at risk. It's not what you know, it is what you don't know.

    I have done a little school nursing with an agency to fill in for the school nurse. My very first experience involved a high school. On just that very first day I had a teacher in a hypertensive crisis. I sent her to the ER. I had multiple sprains. And to end the day I had a tiny Freshman who had been assualted by another student. She had possible neck, chest, and head injuries. In addition to assessing her I had to deal with the school Vice Principal who attempted to get out of responsibility because the assault took place on the public sidewalk in front of the school! Obviously, even that school VP did not know what she did not know. I called 911 and the paramedics soon were placing this young person in a neck brace, starting an IV, etc.

    I also filled in at a special needs school where administration's major concern was getting a nurse comfortable with seizures. I was. One day during that assignment I had a teacher's aid come with a request for some ASA for a teacher. I investigated and found the teacher was having chest pain and a possible MI.

    There are reasons for schools to have school nurses and not someone acting 'as a nurse.'
  12. Visit  MinnieMomRN profile page
    #24 1
    Quote from nyteshade
    once again, if a school has its protocols in place as to how they will address days when the school nurse is gone that is one thing.

    this is not about what you do. this is not about just running the clinic for the day. this is about the overall scope of nursing practice.

    you are failing to see that it is not ok to "act as" the licensed nurse. why is it ok to "act as" the school nurse? does a nurse not have a governing body to answer to? does a nurse not carry a legal responsibility to his/her patients? is there no reason why a good portion of us carry malpractice insurance? i'm sure the tone would change if a job ad stated to act as a doctor, lawyer, pa, np, etc when required.

    if you have ever read your states nurse practice act you will see why so many of us are making "a big deal".

    stepping off my soapbox now.
    well said.

    'acting as a nurse' made me think of the phrase "i'm not really a nurse, i just play one on tv"... yeah, okay then...

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