A Doctor's Mea Culpa to Nurses

  1. You may want to read this because who knows when you'll see a (somewhat) repentant doctor again:

    http://www.tcms.org/magazines/0202.html

    "Could this type of behavior, when repeated by several doctors several times a week over the course of many months, have any effect on the nursing shortage we are experiencing?"

    Well, DUH....
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  2. 17 Comments

  3. by   ceecel.dee
    Dr. Norman, thank you for noticing. I have copied your article and am placing one copy in each of our doc's mailboxes as well as posting it at the nurses station!
  4. by   NRSKarenRN
    Heart Failure!!!

    TWO Docs in one week noticing doc abuse. Wonders never cease.
    There are signs of hope that Docs will change their ways. Have to start someplace.
  5. by   fedupnurse
    Thanks Figaro! I posted an article on another thread but I'll repost it here. And Ceecel.dee, I'll be doing the same!!

    From the July 7, 2002 Asbury Park Press

    Invest savings in nurses
    Kudos to the nurse who wrote the letter "Nurse shortage
    a money matter" because she has addressed the heart of the problem: Show her the money.
    Nurses are the eyes, ears, nose and monitors for the doctor's sick patients, and have been under-appreciated by the health care system for years. It's ironic when hospitals need the nurses most, the administrators/CEOs and hospital trustees permit downsizing the most experienced nurses to save money, jeopardizing patient care.
    It's time to pay the nurses a salary commensurate with their work. We see CEOs and hospital vice presidents making astronomical salaries, with perks (limos, bonuses, etc.) for work that doesn't warrant such remuneration. Let's see the hospital trustees cut those astronomical administrative salaries and invest that money in our nurses.
    Nurses care, but nobody cares about the nurses. That's why we have our present nursing shortage.
    Dr. John Wrable
    TOMS RIVER


  6. by   misti_z
    Well its about time!

    And it will be posted at my nurse's station too.
  7. by   bestblondRN
    I just finished printing a copy, which I will be taking to work and posting on the docs bulletin board in the ICU. Thanks to Dr. Norman for being humble enough address this issue!
  8. by   oramar
    This might upset some people but the truth is that I never minded a normally easy going MD getting upset over one thing and making a fuss. Just as I don't mind my family being difficult once in a while. I have also witnessed other people being patient with me when I have been out of sorts. It is really the chronic abuser that is the one that has to be singled out and stopped.
  9. by   ceecel.dee
    But for him to even recognize it........this is worth comment!

    Pat a dog's head every time he pees outside and he'll never wet the rug.
  10. by   shay
    OMG, I about fell over dead in my chair after reading that article......................
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    It is always gratifying to see ANYone admit and own up to a mistake and make a sincere apology. I just hope others can see this and follow suit; it remains to be seen. I find it a bit sad that it takes a huge shortage of nurses to get ANYONE to care that verbal abuse is a problem and should never be tolerated in ANY workplace, no matter who perpetrates and who is on the receiving end. BRAVO, Dr. Norman.
  12. by   KeniRN
    Copied. Pasted. Printed.
    Gonna post it at work tomorrow!


    Originally posted by ceecel.dee

    Pat a dog's head every time he pees outside and he'll never wet the rug. [/B]
    ROFLOL!!!:roll :chuckle

    Let's see what truth there is to teaching old dogs new tricks
  13. by   sharann
    That Dr. Norman has guts! I admire that. We are all guilty of being short tempered with our co-workers, but when a doc does it...it gets us more than when another does. Interesting humm?
  14. by   trueblue
    WOW, I wish they all realized this.

    I plan to let this be known on my unit.

    Maybe the hearts of stone will soften some.

    You think?

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