8-hour shifts save money? - page 3

by MunoRN

7,496 Views | 27 Comments

I am no billing expert, so I'm hoping some of you out there are. Hospitals in my state are pushing to move to 8-hour shifts claiming that they can increase revenue/save money, although they won't reveal how. (Supposedly $6... Read More


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    Yeah, I don't really understand that. They can staff with fewer nurses doing 12's, which means fewer nurses that need to be paid benefits, not to mention training costs (if you hire an extra nurse a day, then there are more nurses that you need to train initially). The only way it would save money is if 12 hr shifts are causing burn-out, and the majority of the nurses prefer 8 hr shifts, so less turn-over. Maybe I'm missing something, though.
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    Wouldn't it save a ton of money but not paying 4 hours of overtime to every nurse? Or is this not the way it works. The only way I can see them losing money is maybe on the benefits that would go to a 3rd employee?
  3. 1
    Quote from lrobinson5
    Wouldn't it save a ton of money but not paying 4 hours of overtime to every nurse?
    Daily overtime is nonexistent in most states. Therefore, nurses who work 12 hour shifts will not be paid overtime for the last 4 hours of the shift in most states. If I am not mistaken, California is the only state that requires employers to pay daily overtime for anything beyond 8 hours in a day.

    I have worked many 12-hour and 16-hour shifts, and have not received a dime of daily overtime. In the state where I live, overtime is paid in excess of 40 cumulative hours worked in 1 week.
    KelRN215 likes this.
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    Quote from TheCommuter
    If I am not mistaken, California is the only state that requires employers to pay daily overtime for anything beyond 8 hours in a day.
    Well there you have it. I live in California , and I assumed that was the way it works everywhere. Now I don't have an answer for the original question... I'm not really sure how it saves money if you already don't have to pay overtime.
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    In some places OT is only accrued after 40 hours of work.....so you might work 16 one shift and 16 the next and and none of that would be OT.

    We get OT after 8, if we are sheduled for 8, over 12 if we are scheduled for 12. Personally, I don't want someone who's worked 12 or maybe 3 12's taking care of me or mine.
  6. 0
    Quote from tntrn
    . Personally, I don't want someone who's worked 12 or maybe 3 12's taking care of me or mine.
    Any particular reason for that?
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    Quote from lrobinson5
    Well there you have it. I live in California , and I assumed that was the way it works everywhere. Now I don't have an answer for the original question... I'm not really sure how it saves money if you already don't have to pay overtime.
    *** Nurses working 12 hour shifts in California don't get 4 hours of overtime either. There is an exception in the law for those who are under contract. I spent 9 weeks doing per diem work in Ca and got OT for ever hour over 8 cause as a per diem I wasn't under contract. Howver the staff nurses I was working with did not make OT for their regularly scheduled 12 hour shifts.
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    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** Nurses working 12 hour shifts in California don't get 4 hours of overtime either. There is an exception in the law for those who are under contract. I spent 9 weeks doing per diem work in Ca and got OT for ever hour over 8 cause as a per diem I wasn't under contract. Howver the staff nurses I was working with did not make OT for their regularly scheduled 12 hour shifts.
    That I didn't know, but it makes so much sense. I always wondered why any hospital would offer longer shifts if they had to give overtime. Turns out they don't :P.


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