72 for 80

  1. Does anyone work the 3 weekend 72 for 80 shift? I am currently thinking about taking this position at my facility. You work three weekends in a row, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 12 hour shifts. You get paid for working 80 hours when you actually work 72 hours. After the third weekend you have 10 days off. I was just wondering how it has worked for those of you who actually do this? Do you see a difference in your pay? At my facility you sign a contract and during the second pay period you have a choice of taking the missing hours as no pay, vacation time or pick up extra hours to make up for the missing hours. It just seems to good to be true. The few nurses that I have spoken to love it but there are only 4 that actually do this that I know of.
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   P_RN
    So you
    work FSSn Off MTWTh =36

    work FSSn off MTWTh = 36

    work FSSn =36 off M T W Th F S Sn M T W Th.......that's 11 days off.

    So you work 108 hours? Instead of 160 hours a month? That would make you part-time wouldn't it?

    Would you qualify for bennies?

    Would you get a weekend bonus?

    Would you be using your PTO just to boost your income? I don't think you can earn bennies, by using vacation pay can you ?

    I'm not sure if that is such a good deal. I think I'd rather do a Baylor FSSn every week, and have vacation time accrue so I could go somewhere in the Summer/Holidays.
  4. by   NurseyPoo
    I looked at the contract and asked about the FT or PT benefits. The position is considered FT. I can add days to make up the last weekend. Most work 2 extra days at the end or beginning of the next pay period. I have been asking a lot of questions and they all seem pretty happy with it. One nurse told me she did so much overtime before she took this position that she has more time now. She will pick up extra days still but she does them at the end of her 3 weeks by working on Monday too, and then she will work on Thursday at the beginning of the next weekend to work. There is always overtime on the week days so she works during the week for her OT. She loves it and said that she always makes sure to have at least 7 to 9 days off so she can spend time with her family. So, I have figured that I would work it like this due to the pay period starting on Sunday:

    Pay period 1 - Week 1: Th-F-S-Sn (48 hours) + 4 extra
    Pay period 1 - Week 2: F-S (24hours) + 4 extra
    Pay period 2 - Week 3: Sn (prev.wk) F-S-Sn-M (60 hours) + 4 extra
    Pay period 2 - Week 4: Tuesday through following Wednesday (9 days) off and then return to work F-S(24 hours) + 4 extra (Sn starts a new pay period)


    The 4 extra hours each week is part of the contract. Work 36 hour and get paid for 40, so by the end of the pay period you wind up with 8 extra hours. If you choose not yo pick up extra days you still get paid for the extra 8 hours. I set my schedule up like this because this is what most do, and not one has had a problem with the extra time if they want to add more days.
  5. by   ACESfan87
    Hmm i think it sounds too good to be tru but im a student so what do i know
  6. by   subee
    Quote from abu1030
    I looked at the contract and asked about the FT or PT benefits. The position is considered FT. I can add days to make up the last weekend. Most work 2 extra days at the end or beginning of the next pay period. I have been asking a lot of questions and they all seem pretty happy with it. One nurse told me she did so much overtime before she took this position that she has more time now. She will pick up extra days still but she does them at the end of her 3 weeks by working on Monday too, and then she will work on Thursday at the beginning of the next weekend to work. There is always overtime on the week days so she works during the week for her OT. She loves it and said that she always makes sure to have at least 7 to 9 days off so she can spend time with her family. So, I have figured that I would work it like this due to the pay period starting on Sunday:

    Pay period 1 - Week 1: Th-F-S-Sn (48 hours) + 4 extra
    Pay period 1 - Week 2: F-S (24hours) + 4 extra
    Pay period 2 - Week 3: Sn (prev.wk) F-S-Sn-M (60 hours) + 4 extra
    Pay period 2 - Week 4: Tuesday through following Wednesday (9 days) off and then return to work F-S(24 hours) + 4 extra (Sn starts a new pay period)


    The 4 extra hours each week is part of the contract. Work 36 hour and get paid for 40, so by the end of the pay period you wind up with 8 extra hours. If you choose not yo pick up extra days you still get paid for the extra 8 hours. I set my schedule up like this because this is what most do, and not one has had a problem with the extra time if they want to add more days.
    I wouldn't want to be a patient in an institution that allowed a nurse to work even 3 12's in a row. Forget about four 12's. Nurse could trade places with the patient by that point.
  7. by   kontakt
    I work for a healthcare system that pays it full-time night shift nurses 40 hours for every 36 hours worked in one week. This could be 4 nine-hour shifts per week or 3 12-hour shifts per week. This is NOT just week-end work, by the way. These are regular 3 shifts per week (for 12-hour shifts) or 4 shifts per week (for 9-hour shifts). We are still obligated to work every other weekend.

    Without a doubt, this is a sweet deal!

    I don't know of any other near-by hospitals that offer this kind of full-time night shift benefit. Interestingly, it is STILL difficult to find full-time night shift nurses to work for our hospital.

    It is a tough benefit to give up. We basically get paid for 4 hours of non-work. I don't see myself working outside this particular healthcare system (which includes two hospitals, by the way).

    Interesting to read that other healthcare facilities offer similar benefits.
  8. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from subee
    I wouldn't want to be a patient in an institution that allowed a nurse to work even 3 12's in a row. Forget about four 12's. Nurse could trade places with the patient by that point.
    Better not be a patient then. I have never worked anywhere that did not "allow" nurses to work 3 12's in a row. Does your facility prohibit this?
  9. by   ZippyGBR
    worked 4 *12 and 7*10 as nights working 3*-12 as days is a lot more tiring though - worked it a few times - then told the NM in question don't ever schedule that again i chose 12s to get away from long runs of shifts
  10. by   NurseyPoo
    Quote from subee
    I wouldn't want to be a patient in an institution that allowed a nurse to work even 3 12's in a row. Forget about four 12's. Nurse could trade places with the patient by that point.
    I understand the concern but some of us can handle 4 in a row...My limit is 4 - 12 hour shifts in a row and then I need a few days to chill out. Most of us do fine...Everyone is different. I work with a few nurses who absolutely refuse to do 12 hour shifts and only work 8 hour shifts. Personally I feel more burned out working 5 - 8 hours shifts...YUCK! Like I said we are all different and our limitations are also different. Just because YOU ARE NOT comfortable doing this schedule does not mean I cannot handle it.
  11. by   RN130
    I am all for anything that meets nurses needs. If you like your work time packaged like this it is great, and, weekends are a bit less hectic. Does you hospital offer weekend differential? Are your extra shifts at OT (above your FTE?

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