7 Things You Weren’t Taught in Nursing School - page 2

All the things you were not taught in nursing school could probably fill a few volumes, but here are a few that I have collected from emails and conversations with colleagues over the years. ... Read More

  1. by   tiger777
    just printed this copy....i need this..all of them are in my ward
  2. by   WestCoastSunRN
    Quote from sevensonnets
    Well, those of us who have never seen or experienced bullying do speak up but we get drowned out by (usually newer) nurses who see it everywhere they look. We tend to be those who are actually satisfied with our jobs and don't consider the look on someone's face or the tone of their voice to be bullying.
    Very true. I think sour attitudes get interpreted as bullying. I've been a nurse for a long time and also have never experienced bullying -- but I sure have experienced nurses who didn't like me, or their jobs, or the world, or that particular day or whatever. Recently I was in a new area doing some training and the equipment was unfamiliar to me -- so I was fumbling around and a nurse from that unit looked at me and treated me like I was an idiot. It actually did bother me at first -- because it was bratty behavior -- but I realized she knows nothing about me (and I know nothing about her life, either), so even though to this day, if I see her -- she won't smile, won't interact with me like a normal person. I don't push it but am always pleasant with her when we're in the same space. And I remind myself I know nothing about her life. I let it roll off my back. She's never gotten in the way of me doing my job or been abusive. She's just sour. No crime in that -- it's just not fun to be around. But it's not bullying.
  3. by   BeenThere2012
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Nursing has seemingly infinite opportunities for growth, change, and redirecting a career. However, most of them require a solid background in bedside care. (Or SHOULD, if they don't.) They tell you about those wonderful opportunities out there while you're still in nursing school, but they fail to mention (or to emphasize adequately) that those opportunities are available to experienced nurses; not to new graduates. You will need to spend some time in the trenches in order to qualify. I wish I could adequately imprint that on our daughter's brain; her other parent (who should know better) has sold her on the bill of goods that she'll be a "nurse leader" the moment she obtains a BSN and a license. No, darlin'. You'll really have to take care of patients first to acquire some experience before you can be a "nurse leader."

    Nurse to nurse bullying, while real, is not as common as one might think from reading the various posts about it on this forum. I've seen two bullies in 40 years. If you're seeing bullies everywhere you look, perhaps you might want to take a good long look inward. Maybe it's not them; it's you. Nursing school does not adequately prepare you for the reality of workplace relationships. It's not all like those sitcoms you've been watching your whole life. You will have to work with people you don't like, don't respect and don't want to deal with. They'll have to work with YOU, too, even if they don't like or respect you. An unpleasant or uncomfortable interaction (despite what all those websites will tell you) is not bullying. Negative feed back is not only NOT bullying; it's necessary.

    Nursing school doesn't teach you how to accept criticism, yet it's one of the most important skills for a new nurse. You WILL make mistakes, and you want them to be brought up to you by the person who discovers them -- not taken to your manager and addressed when the list is so long she cannot avoid it any longer. Most criticism will be well-meaning, and most criticism will be delivered in a manner that you find unpleasant. No one likes to give negative feedback, and most of us never learn how to give it well. The fact that you don't like the delivery doesn't mean you're being bullied, that everyone hates or disrespects you or that the content is wrong. Invest some time NOW and learn to accept negative feedback and incorporate the necessary changes into your practice. It's a habit that will help you go far.
    Awesome, Ruby Vee! Excellent points and very well-written.
  4. by   Elfriede
    Too true Elizabeth.

    I´ve shorted your thread down, translated it free and posted it on pqsg.de/blog.

    Y´s
    Elfriede
  5. by   BeenThere2012
    Good article and topic. As you mentioned, there may be many more points to make on this subject. Personal growth is one I would add, for sure.

    Having been a nurse for many years now, first an LVN and then RN, I have grown and matured over the years as all humans do...However, as a nurse on the front lines of some of the worst times in people's lives, we see a lot and face a lot in ourselves as well. Not all professions provide for or require that.

    Communication as a general topic has a variety of implications, such as perceived bullying, taking criticism constructively and giving the same, communicating effectively with patients/educating them, advocating for patients when you disagree with an order and on and on. Communicating effectively is learned over time. Understanding yourself and facing pre-conceived beliefs and misnomers is needed in order to be objective, accurate, and to evaluate/assess what may be driving certain behaviors in others and yourself. Learning what YOU need and taking care of yourself as a care provider in any discipline goes along with this.

    Being a nurse has at times, FORCED me to look inward and do some work on myself. I have grown in ways I don't believe I would have experienced in other professions.
    Last edit by BeenThere2012 on Dec 28, '16 : Reason: Spacing and typo.
  6. by   SarahLeeRN
    This is a very good article-but I have to admit, I am very curious about that insulin story. What about the dose of insulin and how it was calculated/related to the patient made the new grad nurse unsure about it when it didn't concern the Doctor, the Pharmacist and the Preceptor?? I mean it sounds like the new nurse was right on, but wow!
    Last edit by SarahLeeRN on Dec 28, '16 : Reason: Clarification
  7. by   Slhengy
    Just because you have not seen
    bullying in 40 years in YOUR workplace does not mean that it does not exist. It sure in hell does! Hospitals are run rampant with nurses who bully other nurses and staff. No need to look internally for that one.....it's all up in just about every hospital I have worked in.



    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Nurse to nurse bullying, while real, is not as common as one might think from reading the various posts about it on this forum. I've seen two bullies in 40 years. If you're seeing bullies everywhere you look, perhaps you might want to take a good long look inward. Maybe it's not them; it's you. Nursing school does not adequately prepare you for the reality of workplace relationships. It's not all like those sitcoms you've been watching your whole life. You will have to work with people you don't like, don't respect and don't want to deal with. They'll have to work with YOU, too, even if they don't like or respect you. An unpleasant or uncomfortable interaction (despite what all those websites will tell you) is not bullying. Negative feed back is not only NOT bullying; it's necessary.
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Slhengy
    Just because you have not seen
    bullying in 40 years in YOUR workplace does not mean that it does not exist. It sure in hell does! Hospitals are run rampant with nurses who bully other nurses and staff. No need to look internally for that one.....it's all up in just about every hospital I have worked in.
    And those who scream most loudly about all those bullies usually ARE the bullies.
  9. by   BeenThere2012
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    And those who scream most loudly about all those bullies usually ARE the bullies.
    Ruby Vee...for those of us who have read your posts, we understand your viewpoint on "bullying" or "NETY". You wrote an excellent piece one time where you explained definitions and criteria. Not everyone has that perspective or experience over the years to know the difference.
  10. by   ElizabethScala1
    Quote from tiger777
    just printed this copy....i need this..all of them are in my ward
    Glad to hear you enjoyed the post, thanks for the feedback! And for sharing!!
  11. by   ElizabethScala1
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    And those who scream most loudly about all those bullies usually ARE the bullies.
    Great point. I do agree. While I have never firsthand experienced this... I have heard/seen/run into someone who has most everywhere. Thanks for this comment.
  12. by   nursej22
    The majority of the bullying I have seen and experienced in 30 years has been from non-nurses: providers, unit coordinators, pharmacists, medical records, therapists, techs. All people who didn't do my job, but sure didn't hesitate to tell me what my job was, and complain when I didn't kiss up to them and agree to do their job for them.

    I have been sworn at, threatened, and disciplined for refusing to practice unsafely or beyond my scope. I have seen instruments and charts thrown, and not by nurses.
  13. by   la_chica_suerte85
    Quote from SarahLeeRN
    This is a very good article-but I have to admit, I am very curious about that insulin story. What about the dose of insulin and how it was calculated/related to the patient made the new grad nurse unsure about it when it didn't concern the Doctor, the Pharmacist and the Preceptor?? I mean it sounds like the new nurse was right on, but wow!
    This is probably not the best explanation for why that happened but sometimes, depending on what pharmacist is preparing meds, things come in different volumes then when you had them before based on dilution. Insulin is not really something that would fall into this category, though, and it sounds like it was just being shrugged off for the sake of saving time. It's surprising and maddening how the staff around you (i.e. pharmacy, lab, blood bank) really don't care when you have a question about something like that. I probably would have told the pharmacist that I was sending the insulin back (I haven't been in a situation where I was forced to give something I knew was wrong so I would have probably made up some excuse that it was contaminated so they would HAVE to take it back and give me a new one -- fingers crossed that it comes correct this time!!!!). We have a pharmacist who is an absolute treasure who could probably take one look at the amount and agree that it was 100% not correct and prep a new one stat. There are others who are much less flexible.

    Nursing is pretty much the only group in the hospital mandated to be flexible whereas everyone else can be stubborn and completely inflexible.

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