7.5% Male; 4 % Fem new nurses dropped out of nursing within four years of graduation - page 4

forwarded by psna listserve. joanne laviglio from the associated press would like to interview a male, registered nurse working in a hospital setting today regarding the just released university... Read More

  1. by   OBNURSEHEATHER


    Heather
  2. by   thegame
    I think within the next 5 years that all nurses should be required to gradaute with a BSN. This in the long run could give good reason to bring up salires or ask for more money. Hopfeully within the next 10 years a MSN will be an requirment for new graduate nurses. I know I will catch a lot flack from this. But if you want more respect from other professionals in the medical field, this will be done through education.
    Other medical professions has increased thier educational level such as physical therapist, pharmicist, and PA are going to entry level masters programs. I don't care if nurses out there have a BSN or AN. But i think by raising the euducational level will bring some respect to the profession. :chuckle
  3. by   Q.
    BSN debate??? Again???


    Ok, I am a proponent for BSN minimum entry into professional practice, but I was hoping that the acronym could be lengthened, so that the importance of it could be seen by all!! Cuz afterall, that's what BSN proponents value right? The number of letters?

    How about, BOSND (Bachelor of Science in Nurisng Degree?)


    Susy K, RN, BOSND.

  4. by   Q.
    Originally posted by hapeewendy
    hey I just had the eureka moment that if the stats posted are true
    then 92.5% of male nurses and 96% of female nurses DO NOT leave nurses after four years or whatever.....hey thats not bad afterall......
    hmmmm cough syrup and tylenol really put a positive spin on things sometimes!
    Well, except that wasn't the article talking about leaving the profession? So, we have 92.5% male and 96% female still in nursing, but working prn or someother thing outside the hospital.
  5. by   nimbex
    damn, all I needed to do for a little more respect was get that BSN?



    Does aretha f. have a BSN?

    R-E-S-P-E-CT !


    Sorry group... had to touch it.
  6. by   FTell001
    Most docs don't know..NOR care if you are an LPN, ADRN, BSNRN or the aide on the unit!
    One other thing....correct me if I"m wrong here but the ADRN's and the BSNRN's sit in the same room at boards time?
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Can we PUUUHHHLEEZE NOT make this about a debate in BSN versus AD AGAIN????? that is an old argument that has occupied many threads before this one. This is not what the original article was about anyhow! I, too, am concerned about the high dropout rate of nurses, male, female. It is a concerning issue that transcends our feelings about entry level requirements; WE NEED QUALIFIED PEOPLE period!
  8. by   thegame
    Everyone is taking my message wrong. I don't care if you are MSN, BSN, AD, diploma nurse. One of the biggest post on here is about how nurses get paid so poorly compared to other professions.
    But other professions require at least a bachlors degree to apply. Other medical professions are moving to a higher educational standard and they are just as in demand as nursing. Once we go to all BSN you will never hear the debate about BSN vs AD. Physical and Occupational theaptis had moved from a 4 year degree to masters levels cours. Pharmacy has moved from bacholrs degree to PhamD. Why is there such resistance in Nursing?
    I don't care about how many letters is after some ones name. My name tag just has my first name and I keep my education to my self. I just trying to offer solutions instead of griping about current nursing coditions.
  9. by   hapeewendy
    awwww susy ya got me
    I just wanted not to be all depressed about statistics and percentages etc etc
    and now that we are debating the BSCN/degree thing again I just dont know what to do
    my head hurts waaaaaaaaah
    have a good day
  10. by   Q.
    Thegame:

    I understood you. I was just being sarcastic.
  11. by   eltrip
    Originally posted by thegame
    I spoke abuot this last week. Only12% of nurses out there are under the age of 30. You think the nursing shortage is bad now, wait another 10 years. Our normal class size our junior year is normally 35, we started out only with 27. When we graduated, we only had 19 of the orgional crew. We picked a few up along the way frome the previoius year who got rolled back or RN to BSN.
    Here is a few recomendations from me to make nursing more appealing. Espically for males.
    1. Change the name of nursing to something else. Some hospitals use the Clinician levels such as I or II insteasd of using the word nurse. For some guy this is not to macho. Espically when most male nurses are reguraded or thought of as gay. I catch a load of crap from my buddies all the time.
    2. Require all new graduates to be BSN graduates. Get rid of the AD program. Other professions require an higher educatinoal level to increase there pay. Allmost all Physical Therapis programs are Masters programs, allmost all pharmcy degress are PhamD and Physican Assistants are going to Masters level programs. Most doctors think all nurses are 2 year degree holders and this is nothing compared to thier 8 years of schooling.
    3. Develop an intern program for new nurses or all new graduates that are 18 months long and cover most crtiical fields of nursing.
    4. Allow nurses to pass a certification to pass Class I drugs so we do not have to call the Doc at 0300 for tylenol and getting a mouth full of ther crap.

    This is just a few of the changes that I leave out there to ponder. Please let me know what you think??

    If the current conditions do not improve the profession will never attract new nurses becuase it is a looked down uppon.
    Okay, let's totally FORGET about suggestion #2. Can we agree on that much? What about the other ideas? I think that these are some good ideas. When working in a teaching hospital, how many times have any of us had to page a doc for tylenol? It's enough to make you nuts some days/nights.

    The intern program for new grads? Another great idea. I've seen lots of nurses who, even after 2 or 3 years, didn't have much experience or confidence due to the lack of orientation/preceptorship provided by the facility. I recall feeling very ignorant...stressed, etc...and I had a pretty good orientation. The first year out of school is quite important.

    Perhaps we need to consider changing our title to Clinician. Hey, I like being called a nurse, but it does cause gender bias & misconceptions about our fellow brother nurses. Every time I hear a discussion about "Should we wear caps?" I wonder what our brother nurses should wear. The traditional nurse's cap would be unacceptable for a man to wear. What could we all wear, beanies? berets? How do we educate the public or change the public perception of who a nurse is? Good grief, we have a difficult enough time getting it across to the public that we aren't nymphomaniacs prowling the hospital checking out the "equipment" on our patients, much less bringing them to an understanding that we do more than "pass pills" or sit around at the desk all night eating chocolates since patients SLEEP all night! :chuckle

    Just thoughts here. We're all sifting through the layers of dreck & dross to find something of value, that one nugget of an idea that might actually be worth persuing.

    Later, ya'll!
    Joy
  12. by   shay
    Dude, can we not do the whole ADN/BSN thing again (she says gasping, between administering breaths and CPR to the obviously dead horse......)
  13. by   live4today
    Originally posted by SmilingBluEyes
    Can we PUUUHHHLEEZE NOT make this about a debate in BSN versus AD AGAIN????? that is an old argument that has occupied many threads before this one. This is not what the original article was about anyhow! I, too, am concerned about the high dropout rate of nurses, male, female. It is a concerning issue that transcends our feelings about entry level requirements; WE NEED QUALIFIED PEOPLE period!
    Deb......I'm totally with you, sister! :chuckle :kiss

close