4 weeks notice? - page 3

by eileeny21 11,546 Views | 45 Comments

Hi, I currently work on a Med/Surg floor and have been there for 7 months. I just accepted a full time position at a nursing home, since this has always been my passion and I now realize my calling in nursing. I recently gave my... Read More


  1. 0
    I worked private duty and my family wanted 6 months! The agency only required 2 weeks though. I gave them 4 because I could.

    Enjoy your new position!
  2. 0
    I am going through that right now. They did not teach us this in nursing school. I asked my administrator how much notice they needed. She told me 2 weeks was fine. THEN I get told nurses are 30 days. NC is a "right to work state, so I don't have to give any notice and they can terminate me anytime as well. The rub is that if I want a good standing reference, I have to do the 30 days. Also for me to recieve my PTO balance, I have to do 30 days. I have already made plans to start orientation!!!!! I went to HR and told them what I had been told, that I had been an exemplary employee (which I have been). They have offered me, in writing, that I make up the 10 shifts (8 hours each) in the next 45 days and I will be off of the "ineligible for rehire" list AND I get my PTO balance in cash (about 80 hours worth).
    It really pays to do your homework. I wouldn't care about the rehire status, but the $$ makes it worth it. I am going to a job where I will work 3-12s, so I should be able to get it done. I'll pull a couple of doubles if I can fit it in my schedule. It's funny how they don't really tell you this stuff in orientation.
    New grad may '12, worked there 8 months (rehab in a LTC). Leaving for a GREAT opportunity at Duke.
  3. 0
    It really just depends on the employer and their written policy. Follow the particular employers policy. If you don't you lose PTO and get a black mark on your record.
  4. 1
    Looks like this mind/life control nursing employers are practicing just keeps getting more and more intrusive. If you receive a job offer and that new job wants you to start ASAP and will agree to have you start in two weeks that is what you do. When I read stuff like mmc51264's situation, I KNOW that the idea is to make it so very difficult to leave that it will dissuade you from looking elsewhere. If you start on orientation with your new job, you will be overwhelmed in the learning, and the stress involved with wanting to to prove you were a good choice for them. Adding other shifts to meet some sort of "pay-off to the Mafia" at your old job, only serves to undermine your success.

    Never ever sacrifice a new job for one you quit. Set your goal for the new employer and put all your efforts there.

    If anyone believes that they will be able to go back to an old employer and work again even with the "stellar" review, in this day and age where jobs are scarce, you are being had. Never trust an employer. They will be eternally PO'd that you left - nobody cares if you were a great nurse or not - they just don't care because you quit. That's all. You must understand that, they can have 100's of nurses who are experienced ready to take report at a moment's notice. It is no hardship to find nurses to fill a vacant spot - unless the facility is a trainwreck, and cannot keep nurses on staff. These places will be the ones to threaten. You can leave these places at any time people!

    Remember nursing is a small world, everybody knows what facilities are a hot mess. Spread the word to your nursing friends and also, to your family and non nursing friends. The facts of the workplace situation for nurses, you speak of will seriously freak out people in the community. Let EVERYONE know what the life of a nurse is about in your area.
    GrnTea likes this.
  5. 6
    Quote from CrunchRN
    It really just depends on the employer and their written policy. Follow the particular employers policy. If you don't you lose PTO and get a black mark on your record.
    This ^^ -- and this kind of situation is exactly why it's important to know what your current employer's specific policy is before you start job-hunting and discussing start dates with other organizations. You can't just assume that 2 weeks is standard/universal policy.

    In my experience (with many employers over many years, haha), new employers respect and appreciate that you want to do right by your "old" employer and leave that position under good circumstances; that is an indication to them that you will treat them right as an employee, also. I've never had a new employer balk at the amount of time I needed to serve the expected notice at my current position, or pressure me to start sooner. (Of course, I've also never scheduled a start date with an organization and then had to call them back later to push back the date because I found out I was supposed to offer a longer notice than I had originally offered.)
    chare, Altra, joanna73, and 3 others like this.
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    [COLOR=#000000]If anyone believes that they will be able to go back to an old employer and work again even with the "stellar" review, in this day and age where jobs are scarce, you are being had. Quoted from netglow[/COLOR]

    [COLOR=#000000]This is not always true.. I left company A with proper notice and went back to company A a year and a half later.

    [/COLOR]
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    At our local hospital all professionals (nurses, RT, PT, etc.) must give 4 weeks notice. To leave before that point will make you ineligible for rehire. Look in your facility's policy and procedure to see. Don't burn any bridges you might need to cross 10 years from now!
    Meriwhen and joanna73 like this.
  8. 1
    Quote from netglow
    If anyone believes that they will be able to go back to an old employer and work again even with the "stellar" review, in this day and age where jobs are scarce, you are being had. Never trust an employer. They will be eternally PO'd that you left - nobody cares if you were a great nurse or not - they just don't care because you quit. That's all. You must understand that, they can have 100's of nurses who are experienced ready to take report at a moment's notice. It is no hardship to find nurses to fill a vacant spot - unless the facility is a trainwreck, and cannot keep nurses on staff. These places will be the ones to threaten. You can leave these places at any time people!
    .
    You might have a difficult time getting back in the same unit (although I can think of 2 specific nurses who left and came back at my last hospital job), but so many hospitals are part of systems. I left one facility, and ended up at another in the same system several years later.
    wooh likes this.
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    My health authority requires 4 weeks notice. It depends on your HR policy. Everywhere is different.
  10. 0
    Quote from netglow
    If anyone believes that they will be able to go back to an old employer and work again even with the "stellar" review, in this day and age where jobs are scarce, you are being had. Never trust an employer. They will be eternally PO'd that you left - nobody cares if you were a great nurse or not - they just don't care because you quit. That's all. You must understand that, they can have 100's of nurses who are experienced ready to take report at a moment's notice. It is no hardship to find nurses to fill a vacant spot - unless the facility is a trainwreck, and cannot keep nurses on staff. These places will be the ones to threaten. You can leave these places at any time people!
    The last place I left stressed the 4 week notice thing because their end of the policy was that they HAD keep my position available for ME to return if I so chose for 4 or 8 weeks after I left (I forget). Union rules, I'm sure.


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