4 weeks notice? - page 2

by eileeny21

11,086 Views | 45 Comments

Hi, I currently work on a Med/Surg floor and have been there for 7 months. I just accepted a full time position at a nursing home, since this has always been my passion and I now realize my calling in nursing. I recently gave my... Read More


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    Heck, I had to give four MONTHS notice one time, and that was in an office! A nurse had gotten engaged and her fiance lived out of state, so she was going to work with us until a month before the wedding and then quit and move and get settled in. A few weeks later, she changed her mind and decided to go ahead an move earlier than planned, so she wound up turning in her notice three months prior than she had originally planned. Anyway, fast forward several months, and I meet my now-husband. When we start talking about getting married, I made a comment to a coworker that I may not be able to make the 90-minute drive from his house to here. That coworker told our doc that I was going to leave when I got married and the doc got mad. When I found out that the coworker had taken it upon herself to talk to the doc WITHOUT asking me, I told our office manager that I had not made any decision and it was NO BUSINESS of the coworker to talk to the doc about me or my life. My office manager told me to go ahead and turn in my notice, in writing with a firm date, so the doc wouldn't try to replace me sooner. Because of this I pushed my wedding date up from November to July and gave a written notice in March. It was ridiculous that I had to do that because the previous employee left months earlier and then a nosy coworker went blabbing behind my back.
    joanna73 likes this.
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    4 weeks is the rule of thumb, if you consider yourself a professional nurse. This was taught to me in my nursing program so it was no surprise when I went into the field. What surprised me was how many RNs didn't know or hadn't heard about it. If we are take ourselves seriously as a profession we must act like it as well.
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    My facility policy is 2 weeks. I've never heard of 4 weeks for ant non management position. Even my DH is s mid-level hotel manager and gave 3 weeks at his old job.
  4. 0
    Also depends on the country. In the UK I had to give 4 weeks notice in all my nursing jobs whether on the wards or in the community. Here in Nova Scotia my job only requires 2 weeks
  5. 9
    Quote from tyvin
    4 weeks is the rule of thumb, if you consider yourself a professional nurse. ...What surprised me was how many RNs didn't know or hadn't heard about it.
    If so many RNs haven't heard of it, it can't really be the rule of thumb, can it.
    Bortaz, RN, Hoozdo, joanna73, and 6 others like this.
  6. 1
    The last two hospitals I worked for require 4 weeks notice. Yes, even for bedside/staff nurses. Both are very large and if you become ineligible for rehire at one of their facilities you become ineligible for all their facilities and one was HCA, so that's a lot of hospitals all over the states. I was not gonna risk it plus lose my PTO..We never know what the future holds and sometimes the grass is never greener on the other side. You may want to go back to that hospital in the future.

    As far as interviews, didn't have a problem because the new nurse manager new I had to give 4 weeks.
    tryingtohaveitall likes this.
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    Having an attack of deja vu with this thread.....seem to remember that thread going on for a looong time.

    Last hospital I worked had a policy that you were to give notice for the number of weeks' vacation you had. A clerk or aide would give 2 weeks. An RN would be 3 weeks (until 4 had been earned). If you gave less notice, you could expect to lose PTO that you might have had coming....or, without that as an option, you might just find yourself as a "non-eligible for re-hire" candidate.

    Basic idea was you gave notice for the amount of time it would take to replace you. The higher your level, the greater the notice requested.
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    Perhaps, tyvin, a lot of RNs were not aware of this more common 4 week notice requirement because we have not recently gone through a nursing program, or have been with a single employer for a significant amount of time. Just sayin...
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    edit: darn. I'm sorry. I need to get back into the habit of reading the whole thread. Bad manners. (repeated SCTravelRN's point nearly word-for-word)

    Quote from tyvin
    4 weeks is the rule of thumb, if you consider yourself a professional nurse. This was taught to me in my nursing program so it was no surprise when I went into the field. What surprised me was how many RNs didn't know or hadn't heard about it. If we are take ourselves seriously as a profession we must act like it as well.
    Maybe you were taught it in school because it is becoming the *new* standard. That's great that your school was so conscientious about the details of professionalism. On the other hand, many nurses didn't get that education last year and they're still catching up because it's not every day that they resign.
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    Quote from llg
    Check your Employee Handbook and any official policies that are relevant. If you don't follow the proper procedures for retiring, they can designate you as "ineligible for re-hire" which may prevent you from getting other jobs in the future. Not following the proper procedures can also cause you to lose certain benefits (such as being paid for un-used vacation time, etc.).
    This. It's not just about "making nice" and making sure you're eligible for rehire (which is especially important if you work for a large chain.) Leftover PTO and such will be lost if you don't follow your workplace's policy.

    And this isn't new. I had to give 4 weeks at a job that I quit about 8+ years ago.

    Give 2 weeks and go. Don't give any notice. But be prepared to accept the consequences if you do so.
    Altra, joanna73, and elkpark like this.


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