2nd day as CNA trainee w/ real patients

  1. OMG!!!! Yesterday was my first clinical day of CNA training in a LTC facility. It went really well because I helped pass lunch trays and feed a few patients. BUT TODAY?!?! I had to shadow an experienced CNA in the morning. She was very very good at what she was doing. I felt like a total clutz. She was gettin those patients up, bathed and dressed and I was watching her every move thinking to myself, this ain't for me, I can't do this everyday. I had to watch her empty and reapply a colostomy bag(sp?) Then there was this frail old lady who refused to eat for two days and was severely dehydrated. The CNA noticed she wasn't her same feisty self and alerted the nurses that the lady was a full code and rushed her to the hospital. I was thinking, how do they stay so organized and up on things?!? I am crying as I am writing this because I want to be a nurse (got accepted to nursing school which starts in Feb)but this training thing spooked the hell outa me. I'm scared crazy and top it all of, I have to go back tomorrow and get my own two patients. The ADON will be there with me to make sure things go right but still, I don't know if I'm cut out for this. Has anyone ever felt this way and got through it and if so, please give me some advice.
    •  
  2. 7 Comments

  3. by   powernurse
    i know it is very difficult to think beyond your clinical experinces, but my best advice is to just do what you need to do to get through it. you don't have to work in a nursing home when you are done if you dont want to. you can work in a hospital, doctor's office ( many will hire you as a medical assistant if you have a CNA and then train you ....this is what i did before nursing school) or you can work in home care, one patient at a time...... there are tons of options..... just keep focused on the positives !!!! GOOD LUCK to you too!!!!
  4. by   mandykal
    Quote from dorselm
    OMG!!!! Yesterday was my first clinical day of CNA training in a LTC facility. It went really well because I helped pass lunch trays and feed a few patients. BUT TODAY?!?! I had to shadow an experienced CNA in the morning. She was very very good at what she was doing. I felt like a total clutz. She was gettin those patients up, bathed and dressed and I was watching her every move thinking to myself, this ain't for me, I can't do this everyday. I had to watch her empty and reapply a colostomy bag(sp?) Then there was this frail old lady who refused to eat for two days and was severely dehydrated. The CNA noticed she wasn't her same feisty self and alerted the nurses that the lady was a full code and rushed her to the hospital. I was thinking, how do they stay so organized and up on things?!? I am crying as I am writing this because I want to be a nurse (got accepted to nursing school which starts in Feb)but this training thing spooked the hell outa me. I'm scared crazy and top it all of, I have to go back tomorrow and get my own two patients. The ADON will be there with me to make sure things go right but still, I don't know if I'm cut out for this. Has anyone ever felt this way and got through it and if so, please give me some advice.

    Humm.... "Has anyone ever felt this way and got through it..."

    Oh yes we have.. I remember when the elevator doors opened, and I questioned myself at 21, "what have I got myself into?" This field, so much feeling is involved. The feeling about this job can be felt like it was your first time driving on your own. Notice your priorities to control your vehicle. Stay focus on the road and what's behind you. The radio doesn't exist because you have to concentrate on your driving, Checking your mirrors every so often.... Thinking way in advance when to signal, how about driving standard for the first time at a stop sign on top of the hill praying you don't die out when it's your turn to go. All that nervousness is exactly how some people feel. Then years after driving...now you just jump in your vehicle without hesitant, start it up and just drive off... how was is done? by experience.... Keep yourselve focused and learn. What you're feeling is natural instinct of the unknowned. Sooner and later, it will all just be a memory to smile back....and always remember nobody starts out professional. Professional comes with experience.
  5. by   bethin
    Quote from dorselm
    thinking to myself, this ain't for me, i can't do this everyday. i had to watch her empty and reapply a colostomy bag(sp?) then there was this frail old lady who refused to eat for two days and was severely dehydrated. the cna noticed she wasn't her same feisty self and alerted the nurses that the lady was a full code and rushed her to the hospital. i was thinking, how do they stay so organized and up on things?!? i am crying as i am writing this because i want to be a nurse (got accepted to nursing school which starts in feb)but this training thing spooked the hell outa me. i'm scared crazy and top it all of, i have to go back tomorrow and get my own two patients. the adon will be there with me to make sure things go right but still, i don't know if i'm cut out for this. has anyone ever felt this way and got through it and if so, please give me some advice.
    i felt the exact same way my first day with patients. i had to give a bed bath and i've seen alot of anatomy, but the thought of actually touching it on an elderly man just felt weird. i stared at it for a few mins (thank god the man was unresponsive - wonder what he would've thought?) and then i told myself that i can do this and i will do this and it will get easier. guess what? it does. everyday will be a new experience and you will learn something new everyday. after six years, i still question myself but i do have more self confidence and i know i can handle anything.

    here's a quote that i have pasted on my fridge:

    "i must not fear. fear is the mind-killer. fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. i will face my fear. i will permit it to pass over me and through me. and when it has gone past i will turn the inner eye to see its path. where the fear has gone there will be nothing. only i will remain."

  6. by   AdelaideChic
    You learn something new every shift. A trick to save you time, a method that works better with a specific client, etc. You will get there, as long as thats what you aim towards.
    You were shadowing an EXPERIENCED CNA who noticed the lady was a full code, the CNA prob noticed form having seen her file and info many times before, and so on. With experience comes all that sorta stuff. Set small goals, and be proud when you acheive them. I remember as a student one of my first goals was to be able to effectively use a feeder cup with a client, cos it seemed to just pour out everywhere, which i quickly got the hang of. In the same area, i am now a senior, training staff, adminstering medication and so on. Ill bet the CNA was scared on her first day too, wondering if she could cope. Small steps, not giant leaps.
    I look forward to hearing about your third, fourth, etc, days. Keep me posted!!!! Good luck in school - the skills you are gaining now WILL benefit you in your future practice.:wink2: :spin:
  7. by   MissJoRN
    Hi! I just felt like reading your post and remembering my CNA training...

    First of all, you get points for noting what makes up quality care! Some people never figure that out. Baths and personal care start coming naturally and go quickly. I remember giving a bath to one person and feeling proud and then realizing the "real aides" had done 5 in that time, LOL. You'll learn what "shortcuts" are OK. Like if you have the same assignment 2 days in a row maybe Mrs D doesn't need as thourough a scrubbing as yesterday. You might know if aide Susie had this group for the last 2 days or the wing has been short staffed all week that your residents need some extra TLC today. I'm not saying to "skip" baths or give the dreaded "powder bath" but you'll see what I mean.

    As far as reporting medical emergencies. That comes with knowing your residents first. You'll get a feel for that. I used to give a census sheet to new aides or floats with a few notes on it. Just baseline stuff (and personal preferences, like always point slippers due north, 3 ice cubes in water, LOL) Eventually you'll find you can pick up something "off" with residents you don't know. Don't be afraid to check with a nurse "Does Mr J usually talk to the corner of his room?" What's normal for Mr J might be a stroke for his roommate. Let the nurse know if Mr J isn't arguing with that corner, LOL. If there is an emergency, offer to help out. You'll pick up bits of conversations between the nurses- symptoms that concern them. Often it's new weaknesses, change in speech, sudden change in lifestyle, paleness, excessive sweating, SOB, ummm... help me out here, I try not to care for patients over 18, these days, LOL. I'll bet you already know your "red flags" better than me! If I had desk "busy work" at the beginning or end of my shift- labeling water cups, charting I&O, etc, I tried to do it near where the RN/LPN was giving/getting/taping report and evesdrop. These hipaa days that might not be as easy but it was helpful to hear what kinds of things they did and observed (when I just saw pill passing and telephone calls!) I started to know what kind of things Cheryl would want to hear about.

    Remember, it's Day Two!! Guess what- this is half of your first clinical semester in nursing school, LOL. You'll be impressed then when you see how far you've come! Some of your classmates will be "old pro" CNAs, others will need a lot of your help and advice!!

    I love Mandy's post!
  8. by   ABerryGirl
    I recently started as a CNA. Something I've never done before. The first two weeks were very difficult for me. I keep thinking is this really what I want to do. I too am starting nursing school, Jan 2007. I've now been a CNA for a little over a month and I feel much more confident this is for me. After you've helped that older person do things they can no longer do for themselves and they say "thank you" with their heart, it's a very special feeling. To know you can help make someones day/night easier, help them to smile or to just know someone does care for them, this is something that is truly priceless. Not everything we do is glamorous, but everything we do IS helping someone in someway. And in the future when we have finished school and are working as a nurse, I believe we will make wonderful nurses because of all that we have done and experienced. Keep on going, one day at a time. Look to see the good that you are doing and the difference you can make. Good luck!
  9. by   dorselm
    To all of you who responded to my cries, you make this website a treasure! It is day 3 and for some reason, I felt so much better than yesterday. Today, I had to give a bed bath and yes MissJo the experienced aides had done 5 or 6 by the time I was done with one. It was okay because this lady had been sick in bed for 3 days and when I got her cleaned up, she was able to get in the wheelchair and eat in the diningroom. Then there was the older gentleman who I had to feed him his lunch on my first clinical. He was laying in the bed and pretty much out of it. Well today he is zooming around in his wheelchair, goes to the diningroom and feeds himself and then had the nerve to ask me and another student aide to "c'mon over to his place"! We cracked up and were so extremely happy to see him up and around talking and laughing. It was hard to believe it was the same person! I thank each of you for your inspirations and believe me when I say that you all wiped away my tears and gave me the confidence to take it one day at a time and yes BerryGirl, we will definitely make good nurses because of this experience. God Bless you all and may you all excel in your future endeavors!!!

close