2nd Career - Are you happy with your decision to become a nurse? - page 2

Hi - For those of you who went into nursing as a second career, are you happy you did or do you feel you made a huge mistake?... Read More

  1. by   SaderNurse05
    Quote from hollyjolly
    I've only been a nurse since May but have come to regret it. Its just so stressful and I want to give quality care to my patients. But each day is so busy and can be quite chaotic to the point I can't be the kind of nurse I want. Also, your needs are put last. Some days I've gone without eating, going to the bathroom and taking my own asthma meds because theres just too much to do. I knew early in nursing school that maybe being a nurse wasn't a good fit for me. Also, I didn't want to let my family down. I knew I should've listened to my instincts early on. Oh well, I'll try to make the best of my education even if I'm not happy. I do wish you luck as you make your decision to attend nursing school.
    HollyJolly, don't give up. Life is too short to be miserable. Look at some of the past threads on first year of nursing, time management, etc. And if in the end you decide the hopsital is not for you then know you have a lot of opportunites. Don't worry about letting people down and figure out a way to at least meet your basic needs. I know it is easier said than done but if you made it through nursing school I bet you can find some way to use that degree and not be miserable.
  2. by   ellen 12
    Yes - I trained at age 43 - I don't know what I would do if I couldn't be a nurse. Nursing fills a need in me. And I get to have priviledge of caring for people. I work in an environment that is not too stressful, and I have time to focus providing good care. I work in aged care - I look upon this work as offering me a chance to provide mental health care, medical based care and palliative care. My passion is palliative nursing - eventually the hospital where I work will provide only palliative care. I am currently studying masters papers on palliative. I need to have ongoing study, and always be learning.
    Often the aged receive poor care, due to various factors, such as totally untrained staff, but I get the chance to try and ensure a high standard of care is given, I can make a difference. I work for a charity based organisation, the aim is not profit making, it is to provide a service.
    Last edit by ellen 12 on Oct 22, '07 : Reason: left out words
  3. by   nurse grace RN
    I always wanted to be nurse but never got to school for it.I became a medical technologist instead, until I went to nursing school at 43.I graduated at the ripe age of 46. I love being a nurse because I feel that I actually do make a difference in peoples lives. There are some tough days but there are also great days and great success stories when you see someone improve and go home.
    In the beginning, I thought I made a mistakr too but it gets better--the first 6 months are the toughest. Get Donna Cardillos'd book " my first year as a nurse". It helped me alot. Also, you must take care of your needs first or you won't be able to care for you patients. Take your bathroom breaks , and get some cereal bars or granola bars or some fruit that you can eat---you need your strength... Don't give up yet!
  4. by   HM2VikingRN
    no regrets....I am still in school but I know it has been the right decision for me...I started at 45 will graduate 16 months later at 47...
    Last edit by HM2VikingRN on Oct 23, '07
  5. by   puri
    i really dont know if i made the right decision...im 41 and i am working right now in the middle east...away from my family...everythings new to me...new job,culture,and environment...when work is difficult i had my regrets ...but then at the end of the day ..i still feel great doing what i had done for the day in the hospital...
  6. by   ggfifirn05
    Yes, changing careers in my late 40s was one of the best decisions I ever made. While nursing is extremely frustrating at times (like yesterday!), I am happy I made the change. I'm so proud to be able to say "Oh, I'm a nurse" when people ask what I do for a living. I still meet my former coworkers for lunch or dinner every few months, and when I hear their "horror" stories about how things are going in that business, I just smile and agree with them that I "got out at the right time." Interestingly enough, their complaints are pretty much the same ones that I have: short staffing, administration or management with unrealistic expectations, demanding or obnoxious "clients" and/or family members, attempting to do one's job with inferior or no supplies, etc. So, no regrets with the change.
  7. by   Imafloat
    It was a good decision. I feel like your life unfolds the way it was meant to. For me, I was able to be home with my children when they were small. I just became a nurse last year, when my youngest was 7. I feel that my life experience has helped me be a better nurse. I also like the security of knowing that I have job portability. If we have to move for my hubby's job, I know that I will be able to find employment.

    Holly Jolly, don't give up. Perhaps you are in a bad job. I am almost done with my first year and I am finally feeling competent. I work with a lot of wonderful people and it has taken me this long to feel completely comfortable. There are some days that I wonder why I chose this profession, but I had those in my last career.
  8. by   akwill
    I am concerned about the 2 year practicum, where I will have to give up my full time salary. How do people do it financially? Is it possible to do the clinical work on a part time basis?

    I really want to pursue nursing, but am concerned about the loss of income and being able to survive financially during this time. I look forward to hearing from experienced voices!!!
  9. by   lauralei2
    I am happy with my decision to be a nurse, however the hospital where I work at makes it more difficult each day in giving us a 7 patient ratio. We have private rooms doubled up, we have patients in the hallways, and the nursing staff remains the same, just more work put upon us. We are not an inner city hospital.
  10. by   HappyDay
    Quote from akwill
    I am concerned about the 2 year practicum, where I will have to give up my full time salary. How do people do it financially? Is it possible to do the clinical work on a part time basis?

    I really want to pursue nursing, but am concerned about the loss of income and being able to survive financially during this time. I look forward to hearing from experienced voices!!!
    Look for a program that is only on evenings and weekends. You can still continue to work full time. It will be a balancing act.

    I spent several years teaching Child Development before going back for my RN. So far, it has been the right decesion. As one person told me, "Out of the frying pan and into the fire". I know there will be many things from teaching that I can use in nursing. Every day is a new chance to follow my dreams.
  11. by   akwill
    Thanks for the response. Can you tell me about night and weekend programs? I am in CT. Where would l look for this type of program? Thanks.
  12. by   HM2VikingRN
    Check out the community colleges....
  13. by   3rdgenRN2B
    NCC (here in CT) has a part-time evening program. That's what I'm aiming for. Yes, with completing pre and co-reqs first and then doing the clinicals it will take me a whopping 4 years to finish but at least I will be able to keep my current job while in school. I know Norwalk is a hike from where you are but if you're looking for an ADN program, look into the other connecticut community colleges. I'm sure their programs are all very similar. Good luck!




    Quote from akwill
    I am concerned about the 2 year practicum, where I will have to give up my full time salary. How do people do it financially? Is it possible to do the clinical work on a part time basis?

    I really want to pursue nursing, but am concerned about the loss of income and being able to survive financially during this time. I look forward to hearing from experienced voices!!!

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