200 lb MONSTER! - page 2

Anyone else see this surgical show on Discovery Health? A lady from Mich. had a 200 lb NF tumor that doctors had refused to remove due to poor prognosis. A plastic/reconstructive surgeon from Chicago... Read More

  1. by   Gator,SN
    I too saw that show and after her surgery and recovery, she gained a bit of weight and she looked like a totally different person! She had a small child, so I think that she was only in her 30's, but when she was sick, she looked like she was 55.
    Unfortunately, at the end of the show they said that another small tumor was recently found in her abdomen.
  2. by   Kayzee
    Didn't see the show, but wish I would have. I also love this type of programing. I'll watch for it. maybe it will be on again sometime.
  3. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    Oh crap, I meant to watch that! Anyone know if it's gonna be on again?

    Heather
  4. by   live4today
    Hi Dennie........a tumor that grows hair, eyes, and teeth?????? Really now??? I have never heard of anything like that before! Amazing!
  5. by   OBNURSEHEATHER
    I've heard of it, but don't remember all of the details, so I'm not gonna talk about it and end up sounding like an a**.

    I can't remember which parts were real and which parts I got from a Stephen King novel about the same subject (freaky.....)

    Heather
  6. by   Heather56
    Dennie, it's called a Dermoid cyst or a teratoma. One theory is that it is a twin ovum that is absorbed by the first and just stays inside slowly growing. You know how every once in a while a tabloid boasts about some man being pregnant? It's probably just a large Dermoid cyst growing in his abdomen!
  7. by   P_RN
    http://www.beloitdailynews.com/1299/1ill31.htm
    .....Hoogewind lost 40 percent of her skin in the operation. The procedure required more than 120 units of blood.
    Why didn't she go into DIC or something?

    Did radiation cause it to grow?
    http://www.radiotherapy.com/opinion-...atin-Jan00.htm

    Did this lady have Neurofibromatosis? Did she have other tumors? Don't they grow from nerves?

    Poor lady.
  8. by   kids
    Originally posted by NurseDennie
    Teratomas? Maybe dermoid cysts? I'm confused.

    Somebody who's not senile can answer this - it's the one where the ovum cell goes nuts and tries to form organs, etc. They take out these nasty tumors with teeth and eyes and sweatglands.

    Love

    Dennie

    From Mosby's Medical, Nursing & Allied Health Dictionary, 6th Edition:

    dermoid cyst, a tumor, derived from embryonal tissues, consisting of a fiborus wall lined with epithelium and a cavity containing fatty material, hair, teeth,bits of bone and cartilage. Kinds of dermoid cysts are implantation dermoid cyst (caused by an injury that forces part of the ectoderm into the body), inclusion dermoid cyst (caused by the inclusion of foreign tissue when a developemental cleft closes) and thyroid dermoid cyst (is believed to have developed in the thyroid gland or in the thyrolingual duct)
    also called organoid tumor, teratoid tumor


    I know, way more information than ya'll were hoping for.
  9. by   Furball
    Originally posted by kewlnurse
    I seriousluy have to question the 50 units of blood. 16 pints and your on a complete change over, that would be about 24 units. None of your own blood would be a massuive reaction in the body, sounds like some sensationist journalism going on.

    Maybe...
    except the surgery was filmed...you couldn't help but notice all the empty bags of PRBC's and what looked like plasma. Everything about this surgery was out of the norm..including length...can't remember exactly but over 18 hours. I still can't believe she survived.
    Last edit by Furball on Jul 11, '02
  10. by   Furball
    Originally posted by NurseDennie
    Teratomas? Maybe dermoid cysts? I'm confused.

    Somebody who's not senile can answer this - it's the one where the ovum cell goes nuts and tries to form organs, etc. They take out these nasty tumors with teeth and eyes and sweatglands.

    Love

    Dennie
    Is this the same as a bezoar?


    Ewww gross...just looked up bezoar...it's a hairball!
    Last edit by Furball on Jul 11, '02
  11. by   GPatty
    Yuk! I've never heard of such!
    So...what'd you think? Did she receive that much blood, or was it just sensationalism? Either way...that sure is creepy!
  12. by   canoehead
    Why didn't they diagnos and remove it before the 200lb mark. Surely she went to the MD when it was noticeable, say 1/4 of her body size (25lb)? Why the delay?
  13. by   Furball
    Here's a report Canoe

    Doctors remove 200-pound tumor

    CHICAGO (AP) _ Lori Hoodewind weighed less than 120 pounds. In less than a year, a tumor grew from nothing to almost 200 pounds, enveloping the slender woman and threatening to kill her by leaching away life-sustaining blood and nutrients.

    Hoogewind, 40, of Grand Rapids, Mich., was a victim of neurofibromatosis. Formerly called Elephant Man's disease, the genetic ailment causes tumors to grow spontaneously from nerves and afflicts about 100,000 people nationwide. The growths usually are benign but sometimes turn cancerous.

    For doctors at the University of Chicago, her case challenged their expertise and ingenuity. Two weeks ago, they removed the immense growth in an 18-hour operation that culminated weeks of planning and will require weeks more of skin grafts.

    Expert surgical teams in other parts of the country had balked at the operation, which required the support of cardiac care and skin specialists. Hoogewind lost 40 percent of her skin in the operation. The procedure required more than 120 units of blood.

    ``It sounds as if this is the largest neurofibroma anyone has seen,'' said Dr. Allan Rubenstein, a neurology professor at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York and an authority on Hoogewind's condition.

    Doctors praise Hoogewind's good attitude and intense will to survive. They say their intervention might have been futile without her desire to reclaim life with her husband, Gary, and their 3-year-old daughter, Nina.

    ``Having something like that to look at changes everything,'' Hoogewind said this week as she glanced at a photo of blond-haired Nina in her room at the University of Chicago's intensive care unit.

    The germ of the medical crisis apparently was planted last January, when surgery to remove an orange-size cancerous tumor on Hoogewind's right side was followed by radiation to eliminate the malignancy and to shrink a benign tumor on her leg. The radiation is believed to have triggered the growth of the abdominal mass, which Hoogewind noticed in the spring.

    Hoogewind, who until recently did clerical work for a Grand Rapids insurance company, said she has endured tumors and minor surgeries to remove them all her life. Her doctors in Michigan monitored the new tumor, but its rapid growth and envelopment of her torso quickly presented a surgical challenge they considered almost insurmountable.

    ``Probably more than two-thirds of her blood supply was going to the tumor,'' said University of Chicago plastic surgeon Dr. McKay McKinnon, leader of the team treating Hoogewind. ``I really don't blame the surgeon who says, 'No, I don't want to tackle that.'''

    Doctors at the University of Chicago were doubtful, themselves, but Hoogewind persisted, believing that she would not otherwise live until Christmas. She will spend probably another month in intensive care.

    Hoogewind's treatment is expected to cost more than $500,000, with insurance covering all but a few thousand dollars. Although her condition almost ensures a return of new tumors, Hoogewind's new doctors say they will catch any future growths before they become dangerous.

    Click Here to return to Today's news headlines 

close