2 weeks notice

  1. 3
    I am a new grad. I am currently in orientation on a CCU and was informed a couple of weeks ago that I was not meeting their expectations. They said that they would extend my orientation a few more weeks and at the end of that time, if I was still not meeting their expectations, I would be let go. I was also told that there were no other positions available at the hospital and that this is a terrible time to be looking for a job because of the December grads looking for positions. Needless to say, I have been completely stressed out since that conversation and have tried to work on those skills that were brought up in the meeting. However, based on comments made by my preceptor, I feel certain that I will be let go when I next meet with my NM. In order to avoid being let go, I am thinking of submitting a letter of resignation, giving 2 weeks notice.

    My question to all of you who may have been in a similar situation is this: Once I turn in my letter of resignation with my last day of work stated in the body of the letter, I plan on working out my two-week notice. Since I am an orientee, what do I do if my manager insists on me leaving the hospital at the time that I hand her my letter? I am planning on giving HR a copy of the letter as well. If my NM does tell me to leave immediately, will my resignation letter still take precedence over being summarily dismissed? Should I go to HR before leaving the hospital to inform them that my NM has asked me to leave?

    Any advice that you can provide would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    wondern, skittlebear, and lindarn like this.
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  3. 22 Comments so far...

  4. 17
    If you resign you will not be able to collect unemployment. What happens if they do indeed let you go after this extended orientation and you can't find another job? If they let you go because you are not a good fit, it will be similar to being laid off as opposed to being fired, then you might be able to file unemployment claims until you find something. Another thing if you resign now they may indeed escort you out immediately and not allow you those last two weeks of a check. Third thing to consider what if you are able to meet their expectations, after all they are extending your orientation so it does sound like they are either trying to save your job outright or attempting to keep you long enough to get through the month of December.
    etaoinshrdluRN, batmik, ChristaRN, and 14 others like this.
  5. 8
    Depending upon how long you have been working, you may not be eligible for unemployment anyway, but I still wouldn't quit. Work as long s they will let you and then make them fire you. In either case, the logical explanation is that critical care was not a good fit for a new graduate.
    etaoinshrdluRN, ChristaRN, merlee, and 5 others like this.
  6. 5
    Don't resign! You don't know what they are going to do yet, they might keep you! If you like the job just wait it out!!!

    I resigned during an orientation period. I did say I would work 2 weeks, but since I was only an orientee they said just go ahead and don't come back in.
  7. 8
    Yes, what American RN said, spot on. Unless you feel you are in a hostile learning environment, HOLD YOUR HORSES. I have heard of several situations where the orientation has been extended. Take one day at a time, deep breath, and learn all you can while you are there, be sure you do not throw in the towel now just because you had a talk with your management, or you just might screw yourself without understanding that you have.

    Do, go back to your management, and ask specifically what you need to focus on, and how you might close that gap... This shows you to be concerned, wanting to stay, and taking initiative to be what they want you to be. It could be that is all they want from you...

    Should things seem they still are going down the road you'd rather not travel, then, you should ask your NM if she might write you a rec. letter, also ask other RNs for the same. Be gracious and thank them for the opportunity to learn from them, and hope that at a later time in your career you might come work for them. This is not only gracious, but allows them to feel OK about things too. It's called saving face. You just might elicit more heartfelt pointers from them and might even get an "open door" response too - which means you are welcome to reapply at a later time. This is the way you would want the situation to wrap up.
  8. 4
    Quitters never win and winners never quit.








    Quote from Powerof3jlw
    I am a new grad. I am currently in orientation on a CCU and was informed a couple of weeks ago that I was not meeting their expectations. They said that they would extend my orientation a few more weeks and at the end of that time, if I was still not meeting their expectations, I would be let go. I was also told that there were no other positions available at the hospital and that this is a terrible time to be looking for a job because of the December grads looking for positions. Needless to say, I have been completely stressed out since that conversation and have tried to work on those skills that were brought up in the meeting. However, based on comments made by my preceptor, I feel certain that I will be let go when I next meet with my NM. In order to avoid being let go, I am thinking of submitting a letter of resignation, giving 2 weeks notice.

    My question to all of you who may have been in a similar situation is this: Once I turn in my letter of resignation with my last day of work stated in the body of the letter, I plan on working out my two-week notice. Since I am an orientee, what do I do if my manager insists on me leaving the hospital at the time that I hand her my letter? I am planning on giving HR a copy of the letter as well. If my NM does tell me to leave immediately, will my resignation letter still take precedence over being summarily dismissed? Should I go to HR before leaving the hospital to inform them that my NM has asked me to leave?

    Any advice that you can provide would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    skittlebear, Otessa, lkwashington, and 1 other like this.
  9. 2
    Quote from Powerof3jlw
    I am a new grad. I am currently in orientation on a CCU and was informed a couple of weeks ago that I was not meeting their expectations. They said that they would extend my orientation a few more weeks and at the end of that time, if I was still not meeting their expectations, I would be let go. I was also told that there were no other positions available at the hospital and that this is a terrible time to be looking for a job because of the December grads looking for positions. Needless to say, I have been completely stressed out since that conversation and have tried to work on those skills that were brought up in the meeting. However, based on comments made by my preceptor, I feel certain that I will be let go when I next meet with my NM. In order to avoid being let go, I am thinking of submitting a letter of resignation, giving 2 weeks notice.

    My question to all of you who may have been in a similar situation is this: Once I turn in my letter of resignation with my last day of work stated in the body of the letter, I plan on working out my two-week notice. Since I am an orientee, what do I do if my manager insists on me leaving the hospital at the time that I hand her my letter? I am planning on giving HR a copy of the letter as well. If my NM does tell me to leave immediately, will my resignation letter still take precedence over being summarily dismissed? Should I go to HR before leaving the hospital to inform them that my NM has asked me to leave?

    Any advice that you can provide would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    Have you sat down with your preceptor and talked about what she thinks you aren't getting and how she thinks you can improve? A little heart-to-heart and finding out EXACTLY what she wants might benefit you, especially in this situation. Stress that you really want to improve and if things don't work out, thank her for the opportunity anyways. The preceptor is likely going to be the one talking to the NM - find out what the preceptor thinks you can improve on it, and give it a honest, dedicated shot at doing it. Maybe she'll be impressed enough that you've really taken it to heart.

    It doesn't hurt to try.
    lkwashington and lindarn like this.
  10. 1
    I have asked my preceptor what I need to do to improve my performance and I have been working on those aspects, but it seems that my efforts are not enough. I am afraid that my days are numbered. What is the most frightening is that if I do lose this position within the next couple of weeks, I will need to vacate my apartment by the end of the month, since there are no positions available and I am hundreds of miles from friends and family. I have no support close by.
    lindarn likes this.
  11. 6
    Quote from greenfiremajick
    Quitters never win and winners never quit.

    Untrue, especially if one is in a job that is obviously not a good fit, or other life circumstance wherein self-preservation matters more than anything else.

    However, I agree with others who say that it sounds as though the OP's employer really is working to get her up and running, and unless she is uncomfortable beyond remedy where she is she should stay put and keep trying.
    lananp, symphie, Hoozdo, and 3 others like this.
  12. 2
    Quote from TakeOne
    Untrue, especially if one is in a job that is obviously not a good fit, or other life circumstance wherein self-preservation matters more than anything else.

    However, I agree with others who say that it sounds as though the OP's employer really is working to get her up and running, and unless she is uncomfortable beyond remedy where she is she should stay put and keep trying.
    Untrue, in your opinion. Self preservation should include not quitting; striving to become the best they can be most especially when given the chance to do so, by having their orientation extended. Besides, as the posters have said: quitting serves no purpose and makes the situation even more difficult. I think the OP is scared and wants to be validated in her desire to quit and just be done with the whole mess (who wouldn't?) But it isn't that easy.
    I personally feel that would be a huge mistake.

    OP, my point is, do not give up--strive to do the absolute best you can so you don't walk away with regrets or "coulda', shoulda', woulda's."

    Personal pride and integrity matter most.
    lkwashington and lindarn like this.


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