10 months vs 4 years

  1. Reading the posts I find it interesting it took me 1.5 Years to get my RPN (LPN). They have passed here in ONtario that a RN has to be a 4 year bScN course. To Be a Registered Practical Nurse (LPN)
    It has to be a 2 year diploma course from a college. no inbetween with the complex care needed now a day. The RPN course will be the old RN 2 year course as the new RN's have to have a 4 year University degree. I find the difference between states what a LPN can do shocking. In my job I am the only nurse to 150+ people in a retirement home with 5 aides I do meds and have all responsibilities Doctors orders critical thinking assessments etc.
    Rns in the US seen to have all the same training why the differece? RN's And LPNS should have universal training.

    T.
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  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   P_RN
    I was under the impression that the BSN for Registered Nurse qualification didn't start until 2005?
  4. by   OntRPN
    Yes I am sorry I should have clarified that... I am thinking ahead of myself . Just wondering if the same changes are going to happen in the US. to make eveyone have the same standards or at least closer than what they seem to be now. please correct me if I am reading wrong on the differnce in standards that are expected in each state. 2005 is just around the corner.
  5. by   kiddoRN
    Can someone direct me to more information regarding this change that is supposedly due to happen in 2005? Who's behind this and what will happen to the ADN program graduates?
  6. by   OntRPN
    This is happening in Canada only
  7. by   LadyLurker
    Originally posted by pedsrnstudent
    Can someone direct me to more information regarding this change that is supposedly due to happen in 2005? Who's behind this and what will happen to the ADN program graduates?
    It's happening in Canada. Entry level for nursing, in 2005, will be degree only.

    But that's *entry level*. Those of us who are real old diploma nurses are "grandfathered" in the system, and will not be required to get a degree.

    Most of the students I know, and who do their clinicals in my LTC facility, are in the university program now, and our local college has an agreement with the university to combine the courses.
  8. by   P_RN
  9. by   nurs4kids
    Is that not professional suicide with the already severe nursing shortage?
  10. by   MollyJ
    They have plenty of planning time, so existing programs should be able to find and affiliate with colleges who either have nursing programs or are willing to develop nursing programs. And then, of course, they will need to modify their curricula accordingly.

    I live in a rural state (KS) where we virtually have one BSN program in the western 3/5s of the state. We have a profusion of ADN programs in the west that train nurses for that end of the state. Those ADN programs would offer better mobility to their grads if they were BSN programs BUT I think the limitation is faculty. I haven't seen stats on the distribution of MSN and Phd's but it would be obvious to me, in our state, that they would be concentrated on the eastern half of the state. But that same school that offers a BSN has a very strong MSN program and so the problem is really Phd's.

    In America, I believe two "restraining factors" against the BSN as the level of entry is the preponderance of federal funding for vocational programs (of which ADN programs are considered part) and the ability to have sufficient numbers of MSN and Phd prepared nurses to teach in and administrate those programs.

    The idea that I would someday be "grandfathered in" didn't set well for me and was one reason I sought a BSN. But at this point, it is STILL a moot point.

    I don't think that there is any doubt that unifying the entry level is a gutsy move but one that can have positive effects for the profession over time. I think states that make the move will have to use ITV and other technology to bring BSN programs to the localities so that small rural areas like those in my state can train their nurses locally without sending them "away" to the big city. (Although, I think personally for nurses, going away to the big city can give you a learning experience of greater depth and breadth. It is just not practical for everyone.) One of my biggest complaints about distance learning is that you still need access to a decent library and net based info still tends to be brief, superficial and of highly variable quality. So I think there is truly a need for "real" on line libraries that aren't just the card catalog.

    I'm thrilled to see Ontario (is it?) go to the BSN level of entry. We can only hope it will evoke a little American competitiveness.
  11. by   bhppy
    Actually most colleges are implementing the BSN program this year in collaboration with a partner university. Two year of college then two at the university.

    -The Ontario College of Nurses is responsible for this change.

    -The changes in curriculum are being made now, because if you think about it...new students this year will be graduating in the year 2005. At which point you'll need the BSN.

    I know this because I'll be a new student this year!

    Susie
  12. by   LadyLurker
    Originally posted by MollyJ

    The idea that I would someday be "grandfathered in" didn't set well for me and was one reason I sought a BSN. But at this point, it is STILL a moot point.

    When I graduated over 20 years ago, none of this was even thought of. I didn't want a degree then, and I'm still happy with my diploma. And I expect to be well out of nursing in the next 10 years, so... y'know.

    I'm thrilled to see Ontario (is it?) go to the BSN level of entry. We can only hope it will evoke a little American competitiveness.

    Yes, it's just Ontario at this point. And that will make the Ontario grads even more attractive to the US recruiters, making our shortage even more critical.
  13. by   fergus51
    It's not just Ontario actually. BC is doing the same thing. Students entering nursing school this year will be required to get the BSN, no diplomas anymore.
  14. by   LadyLurker
    Originally posted by fergus51
    It's not just Ontario actually. BC is doing the same thing. Students entering nursing school this year will be required to get the BSN, no diplomas anymore.
    Sorry, fergus51, I wasn't aware of that.
    I stand corrected.

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