"You're gonna need to learn Spanish...." - page 8

I'm a new RN, just started orientation last week. I met with my preceptor on the floor for the first time a few days ago and he made the comment, "Working here, you're gonna need to learn Spanish". I... Read More

  1. by   nurseangel47
    Not to be mistaken for cold here, but they ARE in our country, most obviously by THEIR choice....why can THEY not be the ones who learn English. Free health care, no taxes, US learning their language, hmmmm.....what a life!
  2. by   MS. ICANDOIT
    here is a link to purchase a book written by a friend of mine. She gave me a copy of this book when I told her I was starting in Nursing school last year and it is AWESOME. Easy to read and makes assessments so much easier. http://search.barnesandnoble.com/boo...71442008&itm=1
  3. by   Rnandsoccermom
    My 2 cents. I live in an area where there is a large Hispanic population. My friend works at the local bank. We would have these parents come in the school for bookfairs etc... and not speak a word of English. Things were a little different at the bank. Surprisingly, when at the bank discussing their money, oh my gosh, they spoke English!

    My family is originally from Poland. My grandmothers were both born here. No one speaks Polish. You know why? We are Americans and proud of it!!!!

    My coworkers are from India, the Philippines, Africa, Mexico, Poland, Lithuanian etc.... Just how many languages should I speak to pease all of them? When you actually talk to them, many of them still own homes in their respective countries and plan on retiring there, not here.

    Does anyone want to be American anymore? No, they want to be fill-in-the-blank/American and at some point go back "HOME". This is the problem I have with learning other languages.
  4. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from KellNY
    Not trying to sound harsh or anything, but ethically, it should have been accomodated, as I'm sure your hospitals Pt Bill of Rights says something about the right to have all procedures explained to you in the language that you are most comfortable with.
    That is not realistic.
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from Rnandsoccermom
    My 2 cents. I live in an area where there is a large Hispanic population. My friend works at the local bank. We would have these parents come in the school for bookfairs etc... and not speak a word of English. Things were a little different at the bank. Surprisingly, when at the bank discussing their money, oh my gosh, they spoke English!
    Isn't it amazing?

    My husband works in law enforcement and he deals with a lot of Hispanic truck drivers. One time they pulled a bunch of trucks over for several violations and the drivers pretended they didn't understand and couldn't speak English. I guess they thought it would somehow get them out of the violations.

    But, once it became clear that the trucks were going to be impounded ... lo' and behold ... they could speak English. All the sudden they were yelling, "Don't take our trucks! We'll do whatever you want! We'll fix it! We promise!"

    Apparently this happens a lot once they learn that they're going to lose their vehicles. For my husband ... who doesn't speak Spanish ... the word "impound" works like a charm. He just tells them that he may have to take their truck and, all of the sudden, they can communicate just fine.

    So yeah ... sometimes they actually can speak English but pretend that they don't.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Feb 12, '07
  6. by   PANurseRN1
    In case anyone has forgotten, this is not "allamericannurses.com." We have nurses from all over the world visiting here. I would hate to think someone would feel unwelcome based on some of these posts.

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