"Tips and Gratuities..."

  1. I am very good friends with an RN that I once worked with. We have had a serious disagreement and I need input. Is it ethically compromising to accept a thank you gift from a pt. you've had in your care for weeks on end? Or should a gift only be accepted when it's for the entire staff???:uhoh21:
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Renee' Y-Y
    The general rule of thumb is a gift not greater than about $25 is reasonable & acceptable. Anything greater than that can get you into trouble with your facility...which most facilities have policies that limit gifts to about $25.
  4. by   JacelRN
    I have been taught by my hospital that it is a good rule of thumb to always push off any gift other than that given as a universal gift for the floor. Flowers, candy, fruit, and cards are what are usually acceptable to receive, however, in my experiences, money or other such valuable gifts can lead down an unwanted path both personally and professionally and I have kindly refused despite their insistance.

    Sometimes however, it is nearly impossible to deny it and some patients even leave the "tip" on the overbed table. We have sent the money back through snail mail. I think they thought we were servers and worked off the small cash:chuckle

    JacelRN
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Absolutely no money is to be accepted. We did, however, have a pt. that made a donation to the American Cancer Society and dedicated to nurses that cared for him. THAT was so sweet of him.
  6. by   Paprikat
    We cannot accept gifts that are to one person, however, gifts like chocolates and cookies for the whole floor is acceptable. We have had families donate money, but it goes towards our Christmas party.
  7. by   nurseygrrl
    We don't have a policy on thank you gifts at my facility. I have only recieved small tokens of appreciation and flowers...never money. I have seen pts. give as much as $100 dollars to staff members for holidays etc. I could never accept something like that. I like it best when they give me a card with a personal message. That uplifts my spirit and makes me think, "Oh yeah, THAT'S why I do this job!"
  8. by   lisasmom
    I have received many "thank-you" cards and that is all. They mean more to me than any amount of money ever could.
  9. by   phyrenrain
    To elaborate more, I'm not referring to actual monetary gifts, just little things like candies, lotions, small tokens of appreciation. Her take on it is that we ALL work hard with these patients. I feel obligated to accept their tokens of appreciation so as not to offend the pt. In turn, I end up offending a fellow nurse. I don't know how I should decline without offending my pts??
  10. by   lisasmom
    Phyrenrain,
    I misunderstood your guestion. This is long so bear with me. When I take care of a certain patient for weeks or month on end and they bring me somthing for me alone I usually accept small gifts and keep that to myself. I believe if they had wanted all of the staff to know they would have told them themselves. Most of the gifts have been cards but some have been candy, cookies, I even had one patient paint me a picture. I feel these gifts were given because of the care we gave not to insure that we give good care. I see no harm in accepting small "gifts". Hope this helps

    lisasmom






    Quote from phyrenrain
    To elaborate more, I'm not referring to actual monetary gifts, just little things like candies, lotions, small tokens of appreciation. Her take on it is that we ALL work hard with these patients. I feel obligated to accept their tokens of appreciation so as not to offend the pt. In turn, I end up offending a fellow nurse. I don't know how I should decline without offending my pts??

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