"The Good Ol' Days!" - page 8

I was blown away to find out student nurses could not be married during school, when one of my instructors went to a Public Charity Hospital based Diploma Nursing Program. I loved hearing about... Read More

  1. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    1
    "chief of medicine cardioverting patients with carotid sinus massage. cheaper than electricity. "

    they still do that

    they do, but in the old days there was no electrical alternative, and i'll bet the chiefs don't stay all night at the bedside doing it now.:d
    fiveofpeep likes this.
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  3. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    0
    Quote from merlyn
    i miss the nursing caps. i know they must have been a pain in the butt to wear, but you knew from the cap what school the nurse went to, and if they were an rn or lpn. getting caped was a big thing. it meant you were ready to nurse to practice what you were taught in the classroom, that now you belong to a caring group of people called nurses. at a then, well known 3 year nursing program, it was not uncommon to see the caped nurses cry. it meant that much. it meant that much for me. i didn't even get a cap and i cried. i miss the caps.
    caps were a pain in the behind. i did have a capping ceremony and got capped -- that was a pain in the behind, too. i've never heard of a caping ceremony or of nurses getting caped, though. i know they wear capes in the uk -- or they used to. is that where you are?


  4. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    0
    Quote from ruby vee
    caps were a pain in the behind. i did have a capping ceremony and got capped -- that was a pain in the behind, too. i've never heard of a caping ceremony or of nurses getting caped, though. i know they wear capes in the uk -- or they used to. is that where you are?


    after we passed our first three months in nursing school, there was a capping ceremony (complete with candles and nightengale oath). i still have a picture of me standing next to a classmate, holding my candle and the carnation we got when we went up to be capped.
    we also sang the school song. ("we hail to you st. joe's, may your shining light within us flow, like our quest for truth may it ever grow, as we honor you.") i played the piano when i was a senior for the freshman class that was being capped.


    there's your bit of random trivia for the day.
  5. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    3
    Quote from ruby vee
    caps were a pain in the behind. i did have a capping ceremony and got capped -- that was a pain in the behind, too. i've never heard of a caping ceremony or of nurses getting caped, though. i know they wear capes in the uk -- or they used to. is that where you are?


    with all this modern day romance with vampires nurses should go back to wearing capes. think of the all fun you could have scaring certain patients and striking fear into the students. :d
    wanderlust99, fiveofpeep, and OCNRN63 like this.
  6. Visit  Merlyn profile page
    3
    Quote from ruby vee
    caps were a pain in the behind. i did have a capping ceremony and got capped -- that was a pain in the behind, too. i've never heard of a caping ceremony or of nurses getting caped, though. i know they wear capes in the uk -- or they used to. is that where you are?


    i have a picture of a capping held at helene fuld school of nursing in trenton, nj on sept.12, 1969. it shows the juniors or second year nursing students being capped by the seniors or third year students in what was called a candlelight ceremony. the picture is from the hospital newsletter called the pulsator. also on the same page is another picture of the capped student holding little porcelain lamps during the recitation of the florence nightingale pledge. i save it because an old dear friend is in both pictures. also, at the time i was working as a janitor and my picture is on the second page. i wish that i could upload the picture to this site, but my main computer is sick.
  7. Visit  interceptinglight profile page
    0
    When my little preemie son was in the NICU in 1996, an older nurse told me of the days before pulse oximetry. No alarms to alert a nurse to a sudden drop in the baby's oxygen level.....all they had to go by was a change in skin color.
  8. Visit  OCNRN63 profile page
    0
    Quote from ruby vee
    caps were a pain in the behind. i did have a capping ceremony and got capped -- that was a pain in the behind, too. i've never heard of a caping ceremony or of nurses getting caped, though. i know they wear capes in the uk -- or they used to. is that where you are?


    sorry, my migraine is playing tricks on me. i see now you were clearly talking about "caping" ceremonies, not "capping" ceremonies.
  9. Visit  Merlyn profile page
    0
    Quote from OCNRN63
    Sorry, my migraine is playing tricks on me. I see now you were clearly talking about "caping" ceremonies, not "capping" ceremonies.
    I'm sorry. Catholic School. Can't spell. But boy, can I play Bingo!
  10. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    4
    Quote from RNperdiem
    I remember a world before bariatric sized equipment. Stretchers looked like ironing boards with wheels. Beds were hand cranked and sized small enough for a semi-private room.
    I do miss specific visiting hours.
    Two of the most wonderful things to hear over the PA system:

    "Attention, visiting hours will end in "X" minutes"
    "Attention, visiting hours are now over"

    Bums rush in dulcet tones! *LOL*

    For the few that didn't take the hint a quick walk around the ward/floor and a firm but polite "I'm sorry, visiting hours are over now....."

    Speaking of PA annoucements, does anyone remember those "Attention, will the owner of a blue Ford.... license plate **** please move your car. You are blocking...."
    OCNRN63, sapphire18, fiveofpeep, and 1 other like this.
  11. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    2
    Quote from ruby vee
    caps were a pain in the behind. i did have a capping ceremony and got capped -- that was a pain in the behind, too. i've never heard of a caping ceremony or of nurses getting caped, though. i know they wear capes in the uk -- or they used to. is that where you are?


    whilst caps do have a certain place in the profession's history, and or for some even present day practice, notwithstanding one's own nostalgic reminiscences on the matter, cannot imagine anyone seriously wanting to go back to them today.

    it's sort of like women/girls who pine for *real* playtex rubber or "18 hour" girdles. yeah they did work but you've no idea of the suffering. *lol*
  12. Visit  dirtyhippiegirl profile page
    1
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Two of the most wonderful things to hear over the PA system:

    "Attention, visiting hours will end in "X" minutes"
    "Attention, visiting hours are now over"
    My mom is in and out of rural hospitals in the area and visiting hours are still in effect. They kick everyone out during shift change for two hours of "quiet time" (including when my grandfather was dying and had just been taken off bipap. Our family was informed that it was very special that two of his five kids were "permitted" to stay during the quiet time. He did die during that time. We were all in the waiting room.) and all visitors leave after ten or eleven pm.
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  13. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    My mom is in and out of rural hospitals in the area and visiting hours are still in effect. They kick everyone out during shift change for two hours of "quiet time" (including when my grandfather was dying and had just been taken off bipap. Our family was informed that it was very special that two of his five kids were "permitted" to stay during the quiet time. He did die during that time. We were all in the waiting room.) and all visitors leave after ten or eleven pm.
    Just wanted to say didn't wish to sound mean or anything. However there has to be some balance between the free for all that has become most facilities visiting hour policy, and being totally fixed.

    IIRC some hospitals and nursing homes in the UK are going back to fixed visiting hours, and especially limiting or restricting guests during meal times. Again IIRC the theory was that patients needed some "down time" to have their meals in peace.
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  14. Visit  rita359 profile page
    1
    Speaking of smoking. In the early 70's we had oxygen tanks and tents over the patients on oxygen. Patients who smoked would push back the plastic part that was the tent and light up!!!

    In the 80's I worked on a unit where almost every nurse smoked. The lounge where we got report was so smoke filled a non smoker could hardly stand it. I bought one of the little devices that was supposed to suck the smoke in. Don't know exactly its mechanism of action but it didn't work anyway.
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.


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