"Thats not my patient" - page 5

I think our jobs as healthcare professionals would go a lot smoother if these two sayings were banned from all facilities. "Thats not my patient." "Thats not my job." Any other thoughts... Read More

  1. by   mattsmom81
    If I see the CNA is reading the paper and I'm running behind with my med passes, I see nothing wrong in calling her to assist a slow moving patient to the bathroom.

    The primary nurse is the most knowledgable person to problem solve for his/her patients...so I have no problem notifying them.

    If I see a patient in distress that needs immediate attention I will always lend a hand. But I don't have to stop MY work and be running constantly behind just because I feel I must own every little task that can be delegated. We're talking prioritizing here. Learning to delegate is a skill new nurses must learn.

    When I was a young and naive nurse I let other people overutilize my time and energy. No more. We also mustn't enable the poor workers by doing their work FOR them, IMHO.
  2. by   PJRNC2
    It is difficult to just "step into a room and help" when a family member asks for help. Years and years ago there were posted somethings (it has been over 20 years and I forgot what they were called) on the wall above the patients head of bed. It gave activity-OOB, OOB with assist. BED REST, No HOB ELEVATION ect. and the diet- REG Low Na, ice chips only, NPO ECT. the any fluid restriction, then another that was very important that really needs to be brought back. If the pt. was hard of hearing, visually impaired , ect.I've been away from direct'bed side nursing for many years but some things should be good sense- PUT the patients Tray table were they can reach it- with their phone water and kleenex- and if the patient can not use their right side don't put it there - this sometimes is the fault of the houskeeping when they mop- but if housekeeping could refer to a common communiction board that was kept current this would decrease some of the patients frustrations enough of my spouting- in the old days when we walked down the hall we looked into every room we could just incase someone could not call for help and would be frantically trying to get someone's attention! or find someone trying to escape over the end of the bed! Realy enough now-I'm stopping.
  3. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by mattsmom81

    The primary nurse is the most knowledgable person to problem solve for his/her patients...so I have no problem notifying them.

    My thoughts exactly.
  4. by   ShortFuse_LPN
    Originally posted by PJRNC2
    It is difficult to just "step into a room and help" when a family member asks for help. Years and years ago there were posted somethings (it has been over 20 years and I forgot what they were called) on the wall above the patients head of bed. It gave activity-OOB, OOB with assist. BED REST, No HOB ELEVATION ect. and the diet- REG Low Na, ice chips only, NPO ECT. the any fluid restriction, then another that was very important that really needs to be brought back. If the pt. was hard of hearing, visually impaired , ect.I've been away from direct'bed side nursing for many years but some things should be good sense- PUT the patients Tray table were they can reach it- with their phone water and kleenex- and if the patient can not use their right side don't put it there - this sometimes is the fault of the houskeeping when they mop- but if housekeeping could refer to a common communiction board that was kept current this would decrease some of the patients frustrations enough of my spouting- in the old days when we walked down the hall we looked into every room we could just incase someone could not call for help and would be frantically trying to get someone's attention! or find someone trying to escape over the end of the bed! Realy enough now-I'm stopping.

    We had signs similar to these 4 yrs ago when I worked in a hospital. They were very handy, however, with the new confidentiality laws these are no longer allowed.
  5. by   linda christie
    I trained in the British Forces and i never heard this saying before probably due to the fact that you would not have dared. Anyway just to say hi i am a virgin to both computer and site.!
  6. by   Token Male
    Welcome Scotland and greetings from Australia.
    All the clients in the Unit are 'mine' in my opinion but I cannot look after all 30 all at once; so it really irks me to be attending to the care of some TEAM (?) members patients and then find them sitting in the Nurse station talking. It may be coincidence but often these same nurses are the ones who 'accidently' leave their pager on the desk of the N. station so they do not know they are wanted.
    Our medical staff know to check the allocation book for the responsible person so hone straight in so the phrase "Not my patient" doesn't get used but the attitude sure does.
  7. by   ksanti
    I was working charge this weekend and had a nac tell me she was only responsable for the food trays on the cart. and not the residents who did't get a tray. That the nac who had the resident was responable (who by the way was in dinning room and had no way of knowing that resident didnt get a tray) so the nac called my DON to complain about how unfair I was. I wrote her up and she was a no call no show the next night. This nac has plans to go to nursing school.
  8. by   luvbug
    "that isn't my patient" Doesn't this just give you a feeling of fire in your stomach? It seems that no one wants to go "above and beyond" anymore. It's not just that, though. I just wonder why people can't be slightly more polite and just offer to take a minute to help somebody out. Next thing you know, the person that you asked to help you will need somebody to help THEM, and they may just end up getting a taste of their own medicine, no pun intended
    I don't have that problem much where I work now, but I have come across it more times than necessary in other jobs. I guess I am just a person who likes to help people out whenever possible. Thanks for reading, and have a wonderful day-no matter what you're doing
  9. by   Disablednurse
    I never minded doing anything for the patients, but when I was on med pass and not used to working the floor, if a patient asked for anything like help to BR or something, I did call for the CNA. Our med pass time frame is two hours and anything longer is considered a med error. I had many CNAs get mad at me for not helping or doing what the patient wanted but there was no one to help me pass the meds. Unless it was an emergency, I would always call their CNA to come and let them help. What made me mad was when I was trying to pass meds and look for a CNA and could find none on the hall. That would really cause me to blow a fuse.
  10. by   Token Male
    We may do things different here but we have things called "Nursing Care Plans" that hang on the end of each bed. You do not have to know every patients needs or restrictions because it is written down for you. This should remove the excuse of not knowing and maybe going wrong; of course you have to get people to read them.
    Nurses who routinely use the expression should change it to a more honest one, Eg. "I'm too lazy to assist my fellow workers."
  11. by   udontwannabme
    I really hate to hear "That's not my pt". The other thing I don't like is at shift change, some of our CNA's split with lights going off everywere. I always try to get everything in order before I leave. I had a nurse get mad at me, I had a pt for a whole shift, never got her up. Third shift came on, I was still working in another rm. The new aide asked me if the pt could get up to a bedside comode. I told her I didn't know because I never recieved report on her and she had not wanted up the whole time I took care of her. After I finished with what I was doing, I went in and helped the aide get the pt up, but the nurse was very mad at me for not getting report. The pt was on her team, so why didn't she know if she could get up or not? Before you say you should always get report, sometimes it is almost next to impossible to catch a nurse to even get a little info about pts. One of the good things about working in a small town hospital is that you have a lot of frequent flyers.

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