"Nursing Shortage" The real Solution - page 2

Greetings to all, I know in my capitalistic heart of hearts the only solution to the"nursing shortage" is to pay a professional wage! People will "want" to become nurses. If a nurse could indeed... Read More

  1. by   RNforLongTime
    It's sad isn't it? I am considering making a move to a larger hospital that's further away from me and taking a 4 dollar an hour pay cut all to do something that I like and will be happier. Money isn't everything that's for sure but if you want to eat and live in a house and wear clothing then you gotta work. I will have to make some sacrifices for sure but, in the long run, I'll be a better nurse for it.

    We have to convince insurance companies that they need to reimburse the hospitals for expenses. That is a big problem. Poor reimbursement from HMO's.
  2. by   chrisB
    Money is the answer. I read an article about job interviews. It said that you should never ask about money on the first interview. It would make you look "greedy". I'm sorry...did I miss something???? I thought the fact that I got out of bed to come to work was to make money.....Otherwise, I would stay at home and take "care" of my children.
  3. by   live4today
    Originally posted by kaknurse
    It's sad isn't it? I am considering making a move to a larger hospital that's further away from me and taking a 4 dollar an hour pay cut all to do something that I like and will be happier. Money isn't everything that's for sure but if you want to eat and live in a house and wear clothing then you gotta work. I will have to make some sacrifices for sure but, in the long run, I'll be a better nurse for it.

    We have to convince insurance companies that they need to reimburse the hospitals for expenses. That is a big problem. Poor reimbursement from HMO's.

    Hey kaknurse...sounds like you are pulling towards taking that other job! I, for one, would shout for joy if you did because your current place of employment doesn't sound like a healthy environment for such a great nurse as you! :kiss
  4. by   -jt
    <Paying a pittance for one of the highest stressed jobs in the world should no longer be tolerated. With this money comes the respect from administration, government, and every one else in our capitalistic society.........
    Earning about $40,000 a year, as the average nurse does, is very poor compensation in comparison to the true nursing functions we perform every day.>

    Youre right but when we use that argument in my city, we get told by our employers & even by the legislators, that the police in this city start at just $32K/yr so 'what are the nurses complaining about'. Starting salary for a new grad ADN here is between $50K - $60K+/yr. Even more for BSN.
    We have to use a different strategy.
    Last edit by -jt on Jun 23, '02
  5. by   -jt
    <Only by leaving unacceptable pratice environments or poorly compensated situations will we be heard.>

    Maybe. Or maybe the hospital assoc & the MD assoc will use that as an excuse to lobby the state legislators to change the NURSE Practice Act & take RN responsibilities away to be given to lesser skilled, less expensive workers - including new categories of technicians they say they need because "there are no nurses"- all of which theyare trying to do in NY right now.
  6. by   SharonH, RN
    Originally posted by James Huffman
    Repeat after me: there is no shortage of nurses. There IS a shortage of nurses willing to work for a certain price. (And "price" does not just include salary: working conditions, stress, respect are all factors in the price equation).

    That having been said, the primary problem in nursing is that there is a limited number of "customers" for nurses: usually hospitals, and other such facilities. The way to increase salaries for nurses is NOT some sort of mandate for higher pay; it's to increase the competition for nurses. Nurses who go into business for themselves are a good start in that direction.

    I've been self-employed for 20 years. I am respected, valued, and make a good income. The "average" nurse mentioned in the first posting is most likely employed by someone else. Comparing an employed nurse with a self-employed physician (for example) is comparing apples and oranges. The self-employed usually make more money than the employed (not always ... there are no guarantees) but we are assuming risks that the employed are not.

    If you want more money, self-respect, and fulfillment, stop whining, and take control of your life.

    Jim Huffman, RN

    www.networkfornurses.com

    I agree with this wholeheartedly. It is about the money and control over your personal and professional life.
  7. by   funnynurse
    lol. $100,000 yea, when hell freezes over! :roll :roll :roll :roll
    (would be nice, ever try becoming a crna???) I feel a more reasonable starting salary would be $30-35/hour (then again, I may be minimizing our profression). I do feel your pain and frustration
  8. by   ceecel.dee
    You do have control of your personal and professional life. If it's all about money, you may have to walk. On the other hand (playing devil's advocate), is 35,000/year a poor starting salary for an associates degree? Many I know with 2-4+ years education make less (retail and accounting come to mind).
  9. by   Norbert Holz
    Wouldn't 100K per Nurse solve the"Nursing Shortage?" The one in the hospitals where Nurses don't want to work because of the bad working conditions, low pay and little respect?

    Oh yes, I am in control of my career! I tool all of the steps necessary to get where I am today.

    Do any of you really thing that importing Nurses from abroad or offering tuition money or making interstate license reciprocity simpler or more user friendly will change low compensation or emptying the garbage as an additional duty?

    As a "profession" we have to make it clear that our services are more valuable than they are currently.

    I am speaking of Registered Nurses here not LPN's or CNA's although the compensation for both of these classes of health care workers needs to be addressed as well.

    My "2 year degree" took well over 2 years to earn; almost 5 in fact. I have an Associate of Arts ( a 2 year degree - the first 2 years of any 4 year university program) and an Associates of Science In Nursing ( the "2 year degree").

    There should be an army of assistants helping RN's to do thier jobs. Transcriptionists for any charting, all we should do is sign our name. (competent) CNA's to follow the directions of the RN.

    The real solution is here right in front of all of us! There is the money avaliable! Don't fool yourselves. Spread the word!
  10. by   sandygator
    Well after nearly 30 years, I don't wanna be a nurse any more!
    I am burned out, tired and still 15 years short of full retirement because it took me nearly 15 to find my "niche".
    But just to put my 2 cents worth in...I certainly agree that getting people into nursing is NOT the answer. Education incentives will get them there, but it wont keep them. The median age for nurses currently in practice is what? Wake up people! Figure out what needs to change to keep the nurses once they start. (That would be money and I think even more importantly, working conditions)
  11. by   Sleepyeyes
    Youre right but when we use that argument in my city, we get told by our employers & even by the legislators, that the police in this city start at just $32K/yr so 'what are the nurses complaining about'. Starting salary for a new grad ADN here is between $50K - $60K+/yr. Even more for BSN.
    We have to use a different strategy.


    Don't let illogical, irrelevant comparisons shut you up. We are not policemen; nor are we CEO's. But there IS a nursing shortage and it will get worse if we continue to get paid less than we're worth.
  12. by   -jt
    <Wouldn't 100K per Nurse solve the"Nursing Shortage?" >

    I dont think so. We already have that in my city but we still have a shortage. Its not as bad as other places but it does exist and its not all about money because we are well compensated - thanks to 40 yrs of being unionized & negotiating contract improvements. The bedside RN shortage in NYC is about the workplace. My hospital salaries are only mid-level compared to others in my city. Where I work, day shift ADNs with 20 yrs experience as an RN earn $75K, night shift ADN earns $80K. If they have a BA/BS/BSN, MA/MS/MSN, Phd or specialty certifications in any field, they earn a few thousand more. All straight time base. A little OT at my hospital & they can reach 100K easily. At other hospitals around us, they dont even need the OT to earn 100K.

    Within NYC & now even in Westchester - a suburb north of the Bronx, we have had 100K nurses for a while - since our union contracts provide that we get paid for our years of experience & education. Still some of these hospitals continue to have a shortage of RNs willing to work at the bedside. Remember the old saying: "you cant pay me enough to work in that hell hole"?
    Last edit by -jt on Jun 29, '02
  13. by   HeatherRN
    I don't believe that it is about the money. No amount of money would make me go through what doctors have to endure. My brother is a 5th year ENT resident, married with 4 children and living on 28,000 a year! He will no doubt be compensated once in private practice, but at what price? I spent 4 years, have a BSN (no college debt) and make $28/hr after 10 years, love nursing and have fun every day. My brother has been in "school" for 13 years, has 150,000 of debt and still makes pittence, spends two nights a week with his kids and wife on average and still has call to look forward to!!

    No- the grass is not greener on the other side!

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