"Just" a 2-year degree

  1. Stopped at local pharmacy to pick up prescription. Asked pharm tech how her daughter was (she's a traveling nurse); she said great, we briefly discussed how she's deciding between staying and moving on, compensations etc. I said that I heard that travelers out her way made some really good money.....and the pharm tech said "well, you guys here make really good money with just a two year degree." JUST. Said in such a way as to make me think she equated my educational experience with a humanities major. Hey: poetry, history, nursing, all the same stuff, right?

    I said you'd be hard-pressed to find someone who finishes an RN program in only 2 years nowadays. She shrugged, said her daughter "blew through" it (ten years ago or so). She didn't want to hear that things have changed a TAD since then.

    Sigh. I think I'll take up basket-weaving. Appears I'm qualified.
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  2. 142 Comments

  3. by   texas_lvn
    This is going to offend some people, but she is "JUST" a pharm TECH. I do not see her getting a higher degree . Some people are ignorant , and jealous:uhoh21: . I have much empathy for you.
  4. by   RNsRWe
    Well, I wasn't really thinking of her that way, she does have a daughter who's a nurse and so has a clue. But things have changed ALOT since she had gone to school (and admittedly her daughter took several years to get through school because she "dawdled"). Not knocking the daughter, either, she's an RN after all!

    Mostly I think I was disappointed in what MUST be the thinking of the general populace out there: "just" a two year degree=barely educated. There's nothing in print that says all two year degrees are NOT equal. Hey, I had a two year degree from a bazillion years ago, lol, and it was EASY to get. Humanities/Liberal Arts. Fartsy degree that enabled me to get a good office assistant job at the time.

    So I think alot of people think that must be nursing, too, if it's "just" a two year degree! Can't blame them: until a THREE-YEAR degree for nursing can be established, it's gonna happen.
  5. by   buddiage
    It's one of the hardest two year degrees you can get. I'm up to my eyeballs!!!

    My prerequisites were easier.
  6. by   texas_lvn
    Quote from buddiage
    It's one of the hardest two year degrees you can get. I'm up to my eyeballs!!!

    My prerequisites were easier.
    I AGREE.

    Op, You are a nice person. Most of the general public really do not understand the difference between ADN and BSN. (And most don't want to know the difference.) I am sorry you are upset, but at least you DID get that degree. I am the first out of 5 generations to graduate high school (I have 3 older sisters!) and I am the first outta 7 gens to go to college. It is a BIG thing. You do have education, more than a large amount of the US population. And, come on, if we do not learn something each day we might as well be dead. So, in a sense, you still are in school.
  7. by   hogan4736
    Quote from RNsRWe

    I said you'd be hard-pressed to find someone who finishes an RN program in only 2 years nowadays. She shrugged, said her daughter "blew through" it (ten years ago or so). She didn't want to hear that things have changed a TAD since then.

    Sigh. I think I'll take up basket-weaving. Appears I'm qualified.
    I graduated 10 years ago...the nursing program was 5 semesters then, for a BSN...

    I was "promoted" to pharmacy tech after 10 years of being a psych tech...neither required any schooling
  8. by   HeartsOpenWide
    I think she was referring to the time frame. Two years really isn't that long (regardless of whether on no this is the hardest thing most of us will ever do) most people that get a 2-year degree can not do much with it. I got a A.A. when I transferred to the UC to start the BSN program I am in. No one could give a whoop. Most people now a days need AT LEAST a bachelors degree to get a desirable job, no mater what it is, you have a lot more options. However, with nursing you can get a very desirable, well paying job in "just" two years. Not to discredit any nurses or nursing students, I am doing it too and it is hard as h-e- double hockey sticks.
    I know how irritating it can be though. People run into me and ask me if I am almost done with nursing school. I have to tell them that I just started the program and they are like "what is taking so long" kind of thing. People do not realize you do not just sign up for nursing classes. Not only do you have to apply but you have pre-reqs and if you are going for a BSN you have even more of them and have general transfer classes on top of that (not that you do not know all this because you did it all yourself too)
    Try not to let every little thing bother you. Some people are just ignorant, others may be jealous because you are taking the incentive to better your life (as well as others in the future).
    I am always careful to use the word "just". I work as an M.A. and was talking to the FNP about a phone conversation I had with a receptionist at anther medical office. The woman on the other end did not know what I asking for and I told the FNP something along the lines of "Well, she is just the receptionist" and he said "be careful saying that. Some one could say you are just a Medical Assistant" (which I have seen on this board and I now know how it feels) I never want to be just a nurse and when I become a midwife I do not want to be just a midwife. No one is just anything when they are doing their best. Just like the lady is not just a pharm tech, although it is tempting to say since the situation irritating.
    Maybe nursing school was easy for her girls. I think they are making it harder. I know my teacher said they are making the NCLEX harder....
  9. by   sister--*
    My 2 yr. Nursing degree consists of 2 yrs. HARD, shoulder to the grind-stone Nursing classes. It took me an additional yr. to yr. and one-half to get the pre-requisits done! I suppose if I had taken 22 hrs. a semester plus summers....yea, that.....I could have been done in two yrs.

    Of course, there wouldn't have been enough hours in a day to learn anything much less produce the required course work.

    BTW, my school wouldn't even consider a student's application for acceptance into the Nursing Program until the student had a certain number of pre-requisits under the belt AND had a high GPA.

    Two yrs., what a misnomer!!
  10. by   mrsalby
    The ADN program I am attending has pre req's that are required and the brochure for pre-nursing and nursing shows the "two-year" ADN degree one is awarded is completed in 7 semesters, yes 7, one semester shy of 4 years of school. Go figure. (last 4 semesters is the actual nursing program)

    I was fortunate to have been on a biochem degree path and had all but one req completed and that is a computer class that I am taking on line now.

    I agree with credit given for a 3 year degree and our state is fighting legislature. Some of our classes are 2 credit hours but are required to be attended as though they are a 4-6 credit hour class. Our clinicals and labs are P/F but with a LOT of graded work included...IE: care plans, diagnostic profiles, etc. Only to recieve a pass or fail arrrrgh!

    All boils down to state legislature and how many credit hours are required for generic pre-req's and how many hours for "field of study." They have to cram it all in. Meanwhile, we struggle not to lose our sanity before it is over.

    My biggest frustration is the extra class one has to take for full time financial aide help because the classes for each level (semesters 4-7 = level 1-4) is less than 12 credit hours although if actual time attended is figured it equals 16-20 credit hours for the semester/level. It is all a matter of playing with the numbers. I am paying for mine and utilizing student loans when needed, but it is really frustrating to watch some of the single moms etc struggle for assistance.

    stepping down now!
  11. by   widi96
    I have attended both an ADN and BSN program and must say that I think the BSN program does give a little better base, but there is NO "just" to an ADN Program. 95% of a nurse depends on the person - not the type of degree. I know a couple of our BSN nurses that couldn't hold a candle to a handful of our ADN nurses.
  12. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    until a THREE-YEAR degree for nursing can be established, it's gonna happen.
    And then that'll "just" be a three-year degree to some people. And so on.
  13. by   HeartsOpenWide
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    And then that'll "just" be a three-year degree to some people. And so on.
    There is one. A BSN. But besides that, if you think about it, ASN programs could be considered three year programs if you count the pre-reqs...you can not get into nursing without them....and they are college courses that count to-wards a degree...
  14. by   nurse4theplanet
    I will be very proud of "JUST" having a two year degree in December. People can't bring you down if you don't let them!!!!

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