"It shouldn't be that hard to be a nurse" - page 4

Competition tough for nursing school Interesting. I am sure that some of our pre-nursing and current nursing students may agree but after 16 years in this business, I am convinced that... Read More

  1. by   bigsyis
    [ Most of us are older (meaning we're not twenty-one), we've had careers, and we simply won't take being yelled at. Submissive I am NOT, and there WILL be a limit to what I will take from anyone.

    I know there will be those out there who will shake their heads and say, yeah, kiddo (!!!!), you wait - but trust me, if you knew me, you'd know better. There's a limit. People can think of me what they want, but I expect professionalism from others and demand it of myself. I won't put up with it.[/quote]

    Very well said.
  2. by   cad4296
    I can't believe so many people think that high GPA=great nurse. If that were the case then why does a school that accepts 120 students with GPA's no lower than 3.9 only graduate 80??? Why is it that 40 of those "prime candidates" can't even cut it through school? Aside from the sciences, the majority of the pre-reqs required have nothing to do with nursing so why does that determine how well one will do in nursing school?! Seriously how hard is it to make an A in art?! I just got rejected from a nursing program with a 3.4 GPA. But I can assure you I did not get a 3.4 because I'm lazy or stupid. I have never gotten lower than a B in my college career but I have also worked full time the entire time as well as taking a full time load. I work a demanding job in marketing where I have yet to work less than 50 hours a week. Most weeks I was working between 60-70 hours and taking no fewer than 12 credits. So yes there are times I was forced to take a B in history to get those A's in A & P and microbiology. My last semester I worked my full time job, a part time job, took 17 credit hours including two science courses and ended up with 4 A's and 1 B and on Dean's list. I most certainly would have a 4.0 GPA if all I did was go to school. But I don't. I work my bum off so I can put myself through college. But most schools don't see anything but a number beside your name. They don't realize until its too late that the 4.0 they picked took 2 classes at a time and didn't have any other responsibilities now can't handle the demands of a full time schedule and the work of the real world. *rant over* But its okay. I knew full and well going into college that statistically the odds are against me. I have drug addicts for parents, grew up dirt poor and statistically I should repeat the cycle and never get out of the socioeconomical status I was born into. It's okay. In the meantime I will get my degree in psychology (always wanted to double major). Who knows, maybe I will just scrap my nursing plans all together since I'm obviously not "smart enough" with my 3.4 GPA!
  3. by   jjjoy
    Quote from carolinapooh
    In my opinion, it will be the ABSN programs that will really help this to change. Most of us are older (meaning we're not twenty-one), we've had careers, and we simply won't take being yelled at.
    I do wonder, though, how many graduates of ABSN programs will work at the bedside for any length of time. I'd imagine that most would want to avoid it completely or get the requisite 1-2 yr experience and get out.
  4. by   banditrn
    I spent many years working in critical care - now I'm 'phasing out' in LTC, and will be through with nursing soon.

    The other night I was sitting with one of the CNA's who is taking her prereq's for nursing, and she had her chemistry book - I tried to explain to her how important a good foundation in chemistry, algebra, microbiobiology was for nursing, but she didn't seem to even understand the basic elements of it. I wonder if she'll ever make it through any nursing classes.
  5. by   TrudyRN
    Maybe not getting in should tell her to reconsider her choice of schools and/or her choice of professions. It could all be a blessing in disguise.
  6. by   TrudyRN
    Quote from cad4296
    I can't believe so many people think that high GPA=great nurse. If that were the case then why does a school that accepts 120 students with GPA's no lower than 3.9 only graduate 80??? Why is it that 40 of those "prime candidates" can't even cut it through school? Aside from the sciences, the majority of the pre-reqs required have nothing to do with nursing so why does that determine how well one will do in nursing school?! Seriously how hard is it to make an A in art?! I just got rejected from a nursing program with a 3.4 GPA. But I can assure you I did not get a 3.4 because I'm lazy or stupid. I have never gotten lower than a B in my college career but I have also worked full time the entire time as well as taking a full time load. I work a demanding job in marketing where I have yet to work less than 50 hours a week. Most weeks I was working between 60-70 hours and taking no fewer than 12 credits. So yes there are times I was forced to take a B in history to get those A's in A & P and microbiology. My last semester I worked my full time job, a part time job, took 17 credit hours including two science courses and ended up with 4 A's and 1 B and on Dean's list. I most certainly would have a 4.0 GPA if all I did was go to school. But I don't. I work my bum off so I can put myself through college. But most schools don't see anything but a number beside your name. They don't realize until its too late that the 4.0 they picked took 2 classes at a time and didn't have any other responsibilities now can't handle the demands of a full time schedule and the work of the real world. *rant over* But its okay. I knew full and well going into college that statistically the odds are against me. I have drug addicts for parents, grew up dirt poor and statistically I should repeat the cycle and never get out of the socioeconomical status I was born into. It's okay. In the meantime I will get my degree in psychology (always wanted to double major). Who knows, maybe I will just scrap my nursing plans all together since I'm obviously not "smart enough" with my 3.4 GPA!
    You'll make more money as a Psychologist. You'll be a doctor and be a boss, not a nurse, who will be viewed generally as her daddy views nurses. Thank your lucky stars for "failing".
  7. by   donsterRN
    Competition tough for nursing school

    Nope, not liking Dad one bit...!
    Last edit by donsterRN on May 4, '07 : Reason: including link to article
  8. by   donsterRN
    Quote from mm82
    P.S.-I just got my final grades tonight and am graduating from nursing school summa cum laude!!!!!!!!!
    Excellent; congratulations!
  9. by   GeminiTwinRN
    thanks for your post, Dixielee. i appreciated it.
  10. by   vamedic4
    Earning a spot in nursing school can be tough, even in the midst of a nursing shortage.

    Just ask Georgia State University student Rachel Edmundson, who has failed three times to win entry to GSU's program despite carrying a 3.29 GPA.

    "I don't think it should be that hard" to become a nurse, the 21-year-old said over a chilled coffee drink near the GSU campus
    ____-----_____----____-----_____----___------____-----____----_____


    I think some of you may be missing the point of what this Rachel was saying. She's absolutely right when she says it shouldn't be so hard. Because it SHOULDN'T. Nobody's arguing that there shouldn't be standards to get in, of course there should. Nobody's arguing that some people aren't going to finish, of course they're not. I didn't. But Rachel is caught up in the same boat as several thousand other "qualified" applicants. Those who have an admirable GPA, probably have a good academic background, but the lack of nursing instructors *(and other factors) means that only those with 3.77 and up even get considered. :trout: It's not the student's fault she didn't get in - rather it's the fault of the academic community and nursing as a whole. :trout: There's just not enough EMPHASIS on becoming a nurse, and extolling the values of those of you who ARE nurses. As a society ignorant to the true contribution of nurses, we are getting ready for a new crisis in health care. People truly think that the crap they see on ER and those other worthless shows (even some of the reality shows on the discovery channel paint nurses in a subserviant light) is a true representation of the work nurses do...and it's not.
    What people don't realize is that without nurses, a doctor's job is difficult if not impossible to do.

    I don't know what to say about dad's comment. He sounds a little out of touch....

    vamedic4


    I
    Last edit by vamedic4 on May 4, '07 : Reason: Incomplete sentence/thought...
  11. by   reesern63
    Quote from tridil2000
    We're not talking about medical school, we're talking about nursing school," her father, Chuck Edmundson, said



    she'll never get in now.
    LOL...good point.
  12. by   Tweety
    Quote from Don3218
    Competition tough for nursing school

    Nope, not liking Dad one bit...!
    However, dad has a point.........Americans wanting to be nurses, yet importing foreigners. Do we check their GPA's prior to importing them? Probably not, as long as they pass NCLEX.
  13. by   chickapin
    Quote from cad4296
    I can't believe so many people think that high GPA=great nurse. If that were the case then why does a school that accepts 120 students with GPA's no lower than 3.9 only graduate 80??? Why is it that 40 of those "prime candidates" can't even cut it through school? Aside from the sciences, the majority of the pre-reqs required have nothing to do with nursing so why does that determine how well one will do in nursing school?! Seriously how hard is it to make an A in art?! I just got rejected from a nursing program with a 3.4 GPA. But I can assure you I did not get a 3.4 because I'm lazy or stupid. I have never gotten lower than a B in my college career but I have also worked full time the entire time as well as taking a full time load. I work a demanding job in marketing where I have yet to work less than 50 hours a week. Most weeks I was working between 60-70 hours and taking no fewer than 12 credits. So yes there are times I was forced to take a B in history to get those A's in A & P and microbiology. My last semester I worked my full time job, a part time job, took 17 credit hours including two science courses and ended up with 4 A's and 1 B and on Dean's list. I most certainly would have a 4.0 GPA if all I did was go to school. But I don't. I work my bum off so I can put myself through college. But most schools don't see anything but a number beside your name. They don't realize until its too late that the 4.0 they picked took 2 classes at a time and didn't have any other responsibilities now can't handle the demands of a full time schedule and the work of the real world. *rant over* But its okay. I knew full and well going into college that statistically the odds are against me. I have drug addicts for parents, grew up dirt poor and statistically I should repeat the cycle and never get out of the socioeconomical status I was born into. It's okay. In the meantime I will get my degree in psychology (always wanted to double major). Who knows, maybe I will just scrap my nursing plans all together since I'm obviously not "smart enough" with my 3.4 GPA!
    Totally agree with you! When I spoke to the nursing advisors at the school I was attending for my undergrad, I asked them if they weight any courses by difficulty or put more emphasis on the science grades or anything like that. "Nope", they said. Cumulative GPA is the only basis for admission, and since my GPA included C's in calculus and physics, I would never get in, ever, and why don't I "look into speech pathology or radiology" instead? It was also suggested I look into programs at community colleges that don't have such competition, effectively throwing away 60+ credits from my university.

    Since I wasn't willing to settle for other majors that I really had little interest in, I transferred to a new university, ended up w/ a BA in psych since it was quick and easy and fun, and then got into my ABSN program on my first shot. So I'm half done w/ my program, I'm working part time (even though they say it's impossible to work during this program) and have gotten all A's and 1 B (and the B was a 91% - our A's are 93-100%), and I've gotten 99.99% on all of my HESI's (including med/surg and pharm) except for 1 where I got a 92%. I've had multiple patients tell me that I'm going to be a wonderful nurse. I've gotten wonderful reviews from all of my preceptors. I had a 3.4 GPA going into my nursing program, but I'm half done, and now it's 3.5. This GPA thing bugs me so much. It's one thing when schools also require interviews or hospital experience or essays in addition to GPA. But just looking at the GPA number itself, w/ no regard for the classes that were taken to get that number...it just doesn't make sense to me. In nursing you're supposed to look at and care for the whole person, not just the sick or injured part of that person. So why don't nursing schools look at the whole person when making admissions decisions? Why are some schools so caught up in cumulative GPA when there are so many better, more holistic ways to find the best candidates for nursing?

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