"I'm too young for a living will" - page 2

(this is copied as it was becoming a derail on the "Slow Code" thread). Some ppl think a living will = self DNR order. Many ppl seem to think of living wills as something old ppl should do, but... Read More

  1. Visit  somenurse profile page
    1
    I have found these sites, can't vouch for their reliability, if these types of living wills would be treated as legit. I also think it is wise to get a Medical Power of Attorney, who will speak for you, using your living will,
    when you can't speak for yourself.


    This site claims to offer FREE living wills.
    Living Will | TotalLegal


    this one also offers free living wills:
    Living Will | LegacyWriter


    this "how to" site, suggests asking for a form at your local hospital,
    and adds this: //"A living will must be signed in the presence of two witnesses, according to legacywriter.com. It does not need to be notarized except in North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee."//


    this site charges some fee to do your living will:
    How to Make a Living Will - 3-Step Process | LegalZoom.com







    NursieNurseLPN likes this.
  2. Visit  somenurse profile page
    0
    one could also call some lawyers and compare their fees
    for doing living wills and medical Power Of Attorney.

    It's not much. Doesn't take a long time, either.
  3. Visit  somenurse profile page
    0
    How To Create a Living Will | Legal Wills


    ^good info on that site, with tips and pointers.
  4. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    1
    In my state you just choose whether or not you want to be an organ donor when you get your driver's license. Is it not like that everywhere? The back of my license has a blurb about being an organ donor that I've not paid attention to, but I know there's a little heart "icon" on the top of my photo which means I told them at the DMV when asked that I wanted to be an organ donor.

    Not that I'm wishing more work on nurses, but it would be kind of nice if there was a fill in the blank type of living will that was an automatic process for being admitted into the hospital rather than just asking, do you have one?
    somenurse likes this.
  5. Visit  Orange Tree profile page
    0
    You are torturing some readers (me) by using "ppl" so much (or at all). Otherwise, your message is a good one.
  6. Visit  madwife2002 profile page
    1
    A few days ago a friend of mine went in for minor surgery on her nose, stayed overnight. Nurse came in to give some IV meds and gave her an IV heart med (it wasn't in this country, and this is what her sister witnessed) which was mean't for another patient.
    My friend had an immediate cardiac arrest and died.
    So you just never ever know the moment, I am sure nobody would have thought that this would happen, unfortunately it does.
    You need to have a Living will, but more importantly you need to make your wishes known to your next of kin, so that the living will is taken with you where ever and when ever you need treatment.
    Plus they know exactly what you want!
    somenurse likes this.
  7. Visit  elkpark profile page
    1
    When I was doing C&L psych at a large urban teaching hospital quite a few years ago, I saw the hospital honor advanced directives and POAs that were handwritten on notebook paper -- as long as it was in ink (not pencil), and signed and witnessed, that was good enough. The hospital's position (although I'm sure this is not universal ) was that you didn't have to pay an attorney to draw something official up; as long as the hospital could determine clearly what your wishes were, and that they were really your wishes, that was good enough.
    somenurse likes this.
  8. Visit  anotherone profile page
    1
    How can anyone working in nursing think s/he is too young for this? laughable.
    somenurse likes this.
  9. Visit  NursieNurseLPN profile page
    1
    Quote from Jean Marie46514
    How To Create a Living Will | Legal Wills

    ^good info on that site, with tips and pointers.
    Thank you so much! I havent had time to look it over since last night but i plan to today. Thank you for taking the time to do this! Very kind of you!
    somenurse likes this.
  10. Visit  somenurse profile page
    0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    In my state you just choose whether or not you want to be an organ donor when you get your driver's license. Is it not like that everywhere? The back of my license has a blurb about being an organ donor that I've not paid attention to, but I know there's a little heart "icon" on the top of my photo which means I told them at the DMV when asked that I wanted to be an organ donor.

    Not that I'm wishing more work on nurses, but it would be kind of nice if there was a fill in the blank type of living will that was an automatic process for being admitted into the hospital rather than just asking, do you have one?

    yes, it is the same in most states i have lived in. I only mentioned one could be an organ donor, and later, ALSO donate entire body to science, as some ppl don't know this, thinking, if some organs have been removed, that the org would no longer accept the dead body, but, that is false.

    Most hospitals i've worked in, can also accept a patient as an organ donor, whose family say okay, even if the license doesn't specify it. I've sat in on many many of these conversations about organ donation, when patient is brain dead on a vent in ICU and termination of the vent is being planned. (often a family mtg with doc and nurse) and the myths surrounding organ donation are rampant. Everyone be sure to tell your family you DO want to be an organ donor. That always always helps, when one relative or close pals states, "Yes, i did hear John say he'd want to be an organ donor." Helps family make decision if they have heard it from the patient at some point.

    Science orgs and medical schools will take dead bodies which have been formally embalmed, or not, or bodies which have had organs harvested, or not. Almost all diseases are accepted, too, with a very very few exceptions.
    I see donating my body as a rational thing to do, if it helps some med student, plus, the free cremation is plus, imo. For $3,000 to $5,000 dollars (2012 prices, but, varies from state to state) my family could go have a good time instead. Makes more sense, imo.
  11. Visit  somenurse profile page
    0
    Quote from Orange Tree
    You are torturing some readers (me) by using "ppl" so much (or at all). Otherwise, your message is a good one.

    such a great point to add. Having a brilliant but dyslexic person in my family, i long ago got over being pedantic about deciphering messages, took me a while, but, i did. So long as i 'get it', i'm good. I guess i just don't stress out about it now.

    sorry, it's habit whenever i type now, from texting to pals whose phones only accept so many characters per msg. But, i'm working on it, okay? I also have to work on not posting LOL, too, keep doing that by accident, too. (hangs head)


    so many abbreviations on most pages....

    Me, as an older nurse, sometimes i find the medical abbreviations sometimes odd, these acronyms and nicknames vary sometimes from state to state,
    and from decade to decade,
    and every once in while, i have to google or guess what these initials, or those initials, mean. To me, so long as the person posting can be understood, it's helpful. but, i'll try harder.
    Last edit by somenurse on Dec 8, '12
  12. Visit  somenurse profile page
    0
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    In my state you just choose whether or not you want to be an organ donor when you get your driver's license. Is it not like that everywhere? The back of my license has a blurb about being an organ donor that I've not paid attention to, but I know there's a little heart "icon" on the top of my photo which means I told them at the DMV when asked that I wanted to be an organ donor.

    Not that I'm wishing more work on nurses, but it would be kind of nice if there was a fill in the blank type of living will that was an automatic process for being admitted into the hospital rather than just asking, do you have one?

    Asking if a person has a living will, is now a normal part of admissions to the hospitals i've worked in. If the person says "No", that automatically triggers an offer to have some dept come by and help person fill one in. I've forgotten now, what dept did that. Maybe social services, but, i'm not sure.

    still, a lot of peole don't take up the offer,
    cuz
    they think a living will equates to "do not resuscitate.".


    *sigh*

    Obamacare's offer to pay for/cover everyone to have that doctor office visit, specifically to learn about what a living will IS,
    was what falsely labelled as "death panels"....this only added to some ppl's false perception that a living will IS a 'DNR' order...(the bulk of someone's medical bills often happen AFTER a code, wowza, ka-CHING!!, and/or in final year or two of a terminal illness..so the cost would having insurance companies cover people all having a doctor visit specifically for finding out about what they want in THEIR own personalized, individual, living will, would have paid for itself, as, no doubt, some would have opted "no code if i am terminally ill, or brain dead" and "no tube feeds if i am brain dead" etc.)
    Last edit by somenurse on Dec 8, '12
  13. Visit  somenurse profile page
    0
    Quote from elkpark
    When I was doing C&L psych at a large urban teaching hospital quite a few years ago, I saw the hospital honor advanced directives and POAs that were handwritten on notebook paper -- as long as it was in ink (not pencil), and signed and witnessed, that was good enough. The hospital's position (although I'm sure this is not universal ) was that you didn't have to pay an attorney to draw something official up; as long as the hospital could determine clearly what your wishes were, and that they were really your wishes, that was good enough.

    It is interesting how much variety there is in what is accepted, from one hospital to another, and from one state to another.
    This also varies occasionally, from one doc to another, too. I can't recall ever seeing a doc order 'DNR' when the nurses were like, "No way, that pt is so viable!!"
    but, i can recall this one doc we had, who almost never ever would write a DNR order, no matter what. That was about 15 years ago, he was kinda different.

    but, yes yes yes, everyone should at the least, tell their family their wishes, but, a written living will is better,
    and a medical power of attorney is even better, imo. I've seen brain dead, or terminally ill ppl "living" on vents, tube fed, who probably never ever would have chosen that.

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