"I'm not floating." - page 6

Yup. Unfortunately, sometimes in the facility we have need of nurses on other floors and hey, did you really want to be called off and lose more time? Trust me, the supervisor and I put thought into... Read More

  1. Visit  WeepingAngel profile page
    1
    Quote from Bortaz, RN
    I can assure you, many of the nurses that are getting on your nerves about floating have worked in ****-holes like mine, and have been treated poorly in regards to floating policy. If it's happening enough for you to get angry and come here to make a thread, I GUARANTEE your activities are not being seen, by floor nurses, as being as fair and equal as you see them.
    It is mainly a few individuals who absolutely refuse to float, and have a last float date of at least a month (I'm not exaggerating) before all of the other nurses. They come in, see they are floated, make a scene at the nurse's station, call the supervisor, scream and yell, and they get away with it over and over. I would not describe that as professional. It sets a negative tone for the rest of the shift, creates resentment among staff who float without complaint, and sets a bad example for other staff, particularly new nurses.
    nrsang97 likes this.
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  3. Visit  DoeRN profile page
    0
    I currently work in the float pool and will remain in the float pool until I finish school. But I remember the first time I got floated as a nurse. I was so scared! I had a horrible shift and my floating nightmare came true.

    The secretary mixed my phone and another nurses phone number up for one particular patient. I had a patient that kept calling the other nurses phone for pain and nausea meds and the other nurse said to call your nurse I'm not your nurse. So the patient thought it was me and that I was refusing to care for her. Even though I was in her room every hour asking her if she needed anything and giving her the scheduled meds, asking her pain scores. And we were both minorities and she thought the other nurse who had her roommate was her nurse. Even though I told her I was her nurse at bedside report and wrote my name on her board and assessed her and everything else. She always said no she was fine. So she called the patient advocate and it was a big ordeal and said I wasn't providing care. I said I haven't received any phone calls from this patient all day.

    So I took the manager and advocate in the room to talk to the patient. They didn't want to go in but I am very strong willed and will defend myself against something I didn't do. So they did and the patient said she was calling me and I kept telling her to call her nurse. (It's funny she suddenly remembered I was her nurse when I started questioning her about the phone calls) I said I've been your nurse all day and I asked you 3 times as documented about pain and you said you were a 0 on the pain scale. I said call the number you have for me and I had my phone out and sure enough it didn't ring. It was the other nurse. So after all of that was straightened out the manager had the nerve to ask me if I could stay until 7 even though my regular floor manager called and said she needed me back at 3 for charge with no patients. Yeah right! I went back to my regular floor.

    I do get some bad assignments as a float nurse but I know I don't have to come back the next day so I can deal with it. Also the fact that I get paid a lot more too. I come in, take my assignment, take care of my patients and get the heck out of there. So that bad assignment is there the next day for the regular staff who called themselves dumping on me to deal with. Not saying that I should have all the good patients but be fair. And please don't ask if I can come back the next day when you gave me a terrible assignment today. It's not going to happen.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
  4. Visit  Lil'mama profile page
    0
    We kept a float book where I used to work. I didn't float very often since I was charge.

    The easiest floats were psych to do a 1:1. You just sat and watched the patient and documented. Luckily they weren't too severe the ones I had.

    I was a med surg nurse so float to ICU would be most stable patient not on any pressors or ventilator. They would read my strips for me.

    Often times my float would be a decent assignment...better than what was on my home floor but at times they would give the worst load of patients.
  5. Visit  MatrixRn profile page
    0
    Quote from texasmum
    I guess I must really be old school. It never dawns on me to say I won't take a patient or assignment or have a "hissy" when I see the assignment sheet. Not saying I am ever less than thrilled. Just wouldn't dawn on me to refuse unless it was an unsafe situation. What amazes me is the folks who get away with it time after time! Even the techs!
    From one fellow Texan to another, Amen and well said. I have never refused a patient the care that he or she needs. We are a caring profession and should be delivering care. When you refuse to float you are denying a patient his or her care.
  6. Visit  MatrixRn profile page
    2
    Quote from WeepingAngel
    It is mainly a few individuals who absolutely refuse to float, and have a last float date of at least a month (I'm not exaggerating) before all of the other nurses. They come in, see they are floated, make a scene at the nurse's station, call the supervisor, scream and yell, and they get away with it over and over. I would not describe that as professional. It sets a negative tone for the rest of the shift, creates resentment among staff who float without complaint, and sets a bad example for other staff, particularly new nurses.
    Agreed. And this is where management should step in and realign those nurses expectations of the job. If the requirement is to float then all must float, that way it is fair to all.
    WeepingAngel and texasmum like this.
  7. Visit  monkeybug profile page
    0
    Quote from NicuGal
    Believe me monkeybug, you wouldn't want to be at our desk as a secretary! Sorry you had such a miserable time in NICU. We try to be extra nice to our floats, but there are times we have to give them the feeders from hell because they can't take vents, admits or comp care kid, or kids with umbilical lines . And our L/D will have 3 secretaries and never offer to float one Tony's when we don't have a secretary. Sucks.

    I got sent to CCU once and they plopped me in front of the monitor and told me if it
    Beeped, call the nurse that had the patient. I almost flipped when one guy had a HR of 40....that means CPR where I work lol
    I worked in this NICU for a while, so I actually can take CPAPs, Vents, and lines. We try to be extra nice in the rare event we get someone floated to L&D, too. That NICU was like a shark tank, though, and the new girl was always the bloody piece of meat. I have never worked with a group of women that angry, bitter, and malicious. But yet no one could understand why I didn't jump for joy every time I was asked to go there.
  8. Visit  NicuGal profile page
    0
    I'd kill for a float that could take all that!!! I just don't get why people have to be miserable to the people floating....be thankful for someone to help!
  9. Visit  NurseFrustrated profile page
    1
    Quote from Mulan
    Some floors were so horrible to work on at one hospital, that they were staffed mainly by floating staff from a "good" floor
    that was deliberately overstaffed for that reason.

    Maybe improving conditions and staffing would be in order.

    The kicker is when you agree to come in extra thinking you will be working on your own floor and then get floated.

    Yes, the floater always gets dumped on.

    I don't blame people for not wanting to float.

    I guess if they wanted to float, they would have joined the float pool.
    I agree. I don't mind to do my fair share of floating but lately it has been happening to me once or twice a week. I am NOT in the float pool. I have a home unit. My hospital makes us do it all the time and we get NO extra pay for it. We never get any warning. We come in expecting to be on our home unit and never know we are pulled until we get there. We are told that we are not to complain about it either. We can get pulled two or three days in a row to different units and they never rotate who is pulled. I think they just pick a name out of a hat or something. It is completely unfair. No wonder everybody is quitting and they have to pull nurses all the time.

    My hospital is also the kind that dumps the worst and hardest patient on the nurse that is pulled (because the nurses on that unit don't want to deal with them and know that the float person will be none the wiser). I was pulled tonight and they dumped the hardest patient on me. And this is a specialized unit. These nurses should have taken care of that patient. The other nurses even skipped rooms around all over the place to avoid that patient. Plus they left all the wound care for me to do, wound care that we rarely ever do on my unit and that I'm certainly no expert at. Then they will complain that you don't do it right. Gee thanks. This is why I hate floating. If I wanted to float every week, I would have signed on to the float pool. It's ridiculous.
    Last edit by NurseFrustrated on Sep 10, '13
    workingmama77 likes this.


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