"I don't want to do bed side nursing"...SAY WHAT! - page 9

had a couple different nursing students say: "well, i'm going to school so i don't have to do bed side nursing". one even told me she want to work in plastic surg. office, not at the bed side. ... Read More

  1. by   smk1
    You know, as a student I enjoyed one of the crazy med-surg floors we were on this fall, but I only had 2 patients. Working there with the responsibility and the full patient load may change my mind. I think it is good when people have a good idea of where they want to go. I am leaning toward a PACU position, but have not gotten to observe or learn in that enviornment, so who really knows. I like the idea of ICU also, but have to admit that when I ran down there to look for a missing patients robe, I was shocked at how vastly different the atmosphere was. DEAD SILENCE. (I don't know if I would like that on a regular basis). We go to OB/peds next and I kind of have a preconcieved notion that I am not really interested in L/D due to a variety of reasons and a main one being I don't want to deal with tons of family and friends day in day out, but who knows? I might end up loving it. In any case I hope I have a cleared picture when it is time for my preceptorship at the end of NS.
  2. by   PeachPie
    If nurses are doing bedside nursing just for the experience, fine. However, that does not justify the piss-poor attitudes that I've seen and heard about. I worked as a CNA in a nursing home for the experience and HATED it (well, I loved the residents, hated the work conditions), yet I kept a good attitude, never complained in front of the residents about hating my job, and never rolled my eyes or acted like I was above anything. I did my job, never flaunted how I was planning to go on to "bigger and better things," and never though that I would rise above wiping behinds. I also had nothing but respect from the nurses who did not consider themselves above CNA work. They very rarely had time to help with it, but just a smile and hearing that they were once CNAs made me feel respected and valued.

    Seriously, if you're in a situation in which you're not happy, either get out before your spread your cancerous misery, or grin and bear it and let it build character!
  3. by   Happy2Beme
    Quote from PeachPie
    If nurses are doing bedside nursing just for the experience, fine. However, that does not justify the piss-poor attitudes that I've seen and heard about. I worked as a CNA in a nursing home for the experience and HATED it (well, I loved the residents, hated the work conditions), yet I kept a good attitude, never complained in front of the residents about hating my job, and never rolled my eyes or acted like I was above anything. I did my job, never flaunted how I was planning to go on to "bigger and better things," and never though that I would rise above wiping behinds. I also had nothing but respect from the nurses who did not consider themselves above CNA work. They very rarely had time to help with it, but just a smile and hearing that they were once CNAs made me feel respected and valued.

    Seriously, if you're in a situation in which you're not happy, either get out before your spread your cancerous misery, or grin and bear it and let it build character!


    Bravo, well said!
  4. by   *RubySlippers*
    Well you know, not everyone goes into nursing today to be a Hospital floor nurse, and by no means is there anything wrong with that. I am in my 3rd semester of RN school and I have done my fair share of cleaning all kinds of bodily fluids up and off of people, floors, toilets, etc.

    However, that does not mean when I get out of school that is what I want to continue to do. I am personally interested in working with psychiatric patients (Nurse practitioner psychology) (maybe) will it be easy no, I will have to go through lots of school & more, and I have considered working in a PS office, I have several friends that do and love it.

    I had an instructor my 1st two semesters that was "old school", again nothing wrong with that. But that is not what I went into nursing for and there is nothing wrong with that either. There are so many specialty fields in Nursing now that everyone has a choice. I think if a student realizes they are not cut out for an area during school, that is great, then you don't have nurses treating patients like crap, they are working in a different area they are comfortable with.

    Also, Nursing is not the same as it use to be, they have cut out bed making and all that stuff in school due to CNA's. Some schools require a CNA certificate before you enter RN school, which mine did, but most do not. I worked part time at my local hospital during my first semester as a CNA and trust me, the RNs did not clean butts or change beds. I did it.

    No, I am not too good to wipe butts, do I want to do that when I get out of nursing school? NO. However, I may have to work my year on the Hospital floor just like everyone else, and that is OKAY. Because no matter how bad I think it is, usually it is ten times worse for the patient, and I go right in that room with a smile on my face and treat my patient with dignity.
  5. by   Nitngale
    Quote from Marie_LPN
    And then get pages at three in the AM about someone who is sick, old, or injured.

    No, if someone doesn't like sick, injured, or old people, they'll have to become a hermit crab, because those kinds of people are everywhere.
    Yeah and then without ever getting out of bed, they phone the charge nurse, asking the nurse's assesment which means that the nurse is actually diagnosing. I witnessed this in the ICU (as a visitor).
    If you mean "'those people are everywhere" in the hospital ---then you (generic) shouldn't work in medicine. If you mean 'they' are everywhere in society---that's not true. I can think of many areas where people are neither sick, injured or old.
  6. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from Happy2Beme
    Sorry, don't mean to be rude, but I've been a nurse for 25 years and I've NEVER seen anybody RATIONAL do these things.
    IMO, that's pretty much much like an oxymoron.
    If people DO irrational things, how can you call them "rational"?

    I have seen many, many new nurses have these kinds of ideas; seeming to think they want to be paper pushers.
    I have been an nurse for 13 (and an aide before that), and I have seen plenty of patients do that...and yes, they were rational.

    When the patient will be abusive to an aide or a nurse or a caregiver that appears "fragile -smaller or weaker" and yet be polite and suddenly behave to security, police, MDs and anyone less "fragile", they are obviously cognizant of their actions and rational enough to know what they think that they can get away with and what might seriously endanger them. Much like spoiled chidren that tries to push to see what they can get away with and pitch highly "irrational" tantrums.

    While dementia/seriously mentally ill (seriously as in, unable to know the difference between right and wrong - the vast majority of mental illness does not fall in this category), may be excused some bad behavior, most of the population does not fall in this category.

    (And before someone does the ever present" Well, you must have never been seriously ill, hospitalized or in pain" mantra, please remember that I have had chemo and have chronic IBD.)

    And when we allow it to go on and make excuses, we promote it and cause problems farther done the line.
  7. by   blueiwahine
    I'm 43, and only been in nursing 6 months...I love bedside nursing...just hate all the other hospital B.S....especially love the graveyard shift...I'm stuck on days still in training...about to bail...if they don't put me on the shift and floor I signed up for. My only complaint is I don't have all the years to work my way up to where I want to work...I want to be there now. lol
  8. by   Maverick80
    I'm a nursing student with the attitude i'll try anything once!! So far I've done 2 med-surg rotations, the first one i hated, nurses not so nice and since it was our first rotation we didn't get to do much. Then i was off to GERO which i was at a nursing home. I can never work in a nursing home. I passed meds and played cards. Although at times fun, and getting to know the patients was nice i can't do that day in and day out. Then 3rd rotation back to advanced med surg. I still don't completely like it, but i felt more like a nurse giving IV meds and IVPB for the first time. Being able to actually know what i'm talking about and putting things together that i couldn't previously do. I've also done small out rotations in the OR which i love, PACU which was interesting and Endoscopy which i don't really like. But i use every opportunity to get a glimpse of what i really want to do when i'm out of school.

    I however work as a tech in a local Level 1 trauma center. I've found a spot where i truly feel like i belong. I love the crazyness. I worked for 4 months trying to get this job, it's really hard to get into the ED and i was coming from the outside, not from a floor which makes it twice as hard. At least i wasn't going for a part or full time position, that would have been impossible. I think that no matter where you find your passion in nursing it's never going to be completely glamorous. Some days are better then others. But when you love what you do it makes it so much easier to deal with and going to work is actually fun. Some days i just wish i could do my clinical's at work!! But i can't so i drag myself to clinical.
  9. by   45alex
    The problem with the 'I only want to be a nurse in a plastic surgeon's office" attitude is that even those having reconstructive surgery have other health issues. I used to work on an in-patient dermatology unit....and you better be able to recognize sepsis or if a pt is having an MI or PE. Pts rarely have just one condition....many have co-existing conditions, and that means taking care of all conditions.

    I am a psych nurse now and many psych meds have effects on blood sugars, heart function and kidney functions, not to mention negative neuro effects in some cases. If you don't know the basics of medical-surgery then you will be at a loss when something unexpected happens.

    I can say that every type of nursing I have done (medical, cardiac, ICU, trauma, derm, occupational and school nursing) has all intertwined and built on the other. I don't know of any nursing that is in a 'vacuum'. That is why some basic experience is so important.

    JMHO.
  10. by   smk1
    Quote from 45alex
    The problem with the 'I only want to be a nurse in a plastic surgeon's office" attitude is that even those having reconstructive surgery have other health issues. I used to work on an in-patient dermatology unit....and you better be able to recognize sepsis or if a pt is having an MI or PE. Pts rarely have just one condition....many have co-existing conditions, and that means taking care of all conditions.

    I am a psych nurse now and many psych meds have effects on blood sugars, heart function and kidney functions, not to mention negative neuro effects in some cases. If you don't know the basics of medical-surgery then you will be at a loss when something unexpected happens.

    I can say that every type of nursing I have done (medical, cardiac, ICU, trauma, derm, occupational and school nursing) has all intertwined and built on the other. I don't know of any nursing that is in a 'vacuum'. That is why some basic experience is so important.

    JMHO.
    This may be true, but i don't think that we should assume those that nurses/students who want to work in plastics or etc... don't have the basic skills of assesment and the nursing process that others do. The fact is that some don't want to do a lot of ADL's. Nothing wrong with that, as long as they pick a place where that isn't an integral part of their nursing duties. This does not in any way mean that they won't be able to key in on other conditions the patient may have.
  11. by   45alex
    Quote from SMK1
    This may be true, but i don't think that we should assume those that nurses/students who want to work in plastics or etc... don't have the basic skills of assesment and the nursing process that others do. The fact is that some don't want to do a lot of ADL's. Nothing wrong with that, as long as they pick a place where that isn't an integral part of their nursing duties. This does not in any way mean that they won't be able to key in on other conditions the patient may have.
    I am not assuming that those who want to work in reconstructive or cosmetic surgery don't have the basic skills of assessment. No way. I am only saying that it is a good idea to have that good base of knowledge of all kind of body systems. Why it may not be a good idea to jump from nursing school right into a highly specialized field outside a hospital.

    I haven't worked in a hospital in years, but I still learned volumes during those hospital years about disease processes that I am continually running up against in the outpatient world.
  12. by   Nitngale
    Quote from caroladybelle
    I have been an nurse for 13 (and an aide before that), and I have seen plenty of patients do that...and yes, they were rational.

    When the patient will be abusive to an aide or a nurse or a caregiver that appears "fragile -smaller or weaker" and yet be polite and suddenly behave to security, police, MDs and anyone less "fragile", they are obviously cognizant of their actions and rational enough to know what they think that they can get away with and what might seriously endanger them. Much like spoiled chidren that tries to push to see what they can get away with and pitch highly "irrational" tantrums.

    While dementia/seriously mentally ill (seriously as in, unable to know the difference between right and wrong - the vast majority of mental illness does not fall in this category), may be excused some bad behavior, most of the population does not fall in this category.

    (And before someone does the ever present" Well, you must have never been seriously ill, hospitalized or in pain" mantra, please remember that I have had chemo and have chronic IBD.)

    And when we allow it to go on and make excuses, we promote it and cause problems farther done the line.
    You can not be rational and do irrational things--just by definition alone. Unless it's the insanity defense. The patient was irrational at the moment of the outburst. There are many different types of patients just as there are many different types of humans. For WHATEVER reason someone acts out that is where your psychology training or experience should kick in and control the situation. I don't know what kind of places some of you work in but unless someone had a head injury I've never seen a patient react physically----verbally yes and that was usually from frustration. In any case management has always stepped in and in defense of the nurse. I think the relatives are harder to deal with. Anyway, that is the nature of the beast. That's like a welder saying he/she wanted to be a welder but not get dirty. If someone is "fragile", maybe they don't belong in nursing.
  13. by   arita2
    Quote from mom2michael
    I worked with a lovely new nurse a couple of weeks ago that announced to me (I'm a tech - graduate in 2 weeks from NS) that she did not go to school to wipe butts, help people to the potty or change "nasty" dressings and that if my call lights went off and any of those things were needed - she wouldn't help the patient so I better get my crap together and get those call lights answered promptly. There were so many things wrong with that entire converstation, to numerous to even start discussing.

    What disturbed me the most is I met a fellow classmate of hers later that day (mom was in the hospital) who shared her similar thoughts and beliefs about nursing and both told me they were taught in school that nursing is about meds and charting.....that the facility employs other people to deal with the poo, pee and nasty dressing changes. Both felt it was above them to do any sort of patient care outside of passing meds. Both of them stated they picked their particular fields of nursing (cardiac, peds) because those are the less "nasty" jobs with little to no patient care (other than to pass meds). Now, I will tell you the one on peds has already lost her job after 2.5 months (could it be the attitude?????).

    Now I realize that bedside nursing is not for everyone and the beauty of nursing is that there is so much out there to choose from and explore....but if it's not your cup of tea - get out.

    Oh and this lovely new nurse wants to work ICU now......she thinks it will be like TV (she actually said this) where the doctors will do all the dressing changes and replaces all the tubes, lines, etc.....She'll just have to sit and look pretty while she charts and passes meds.
    Hi,

    Guess i will throw my 2 cents in here. I am beginning nursing school in January. I have worked very hard to get there and will continue to work hard. However, I don't believe that I am to become an RN to change beds, wipe butts, or anything else that is a Techs job. There is nothing wrong with any of those things in patient care, and I will do it on occasion as needed, no doubt, but that is NOT why I am putting myself through the expense and effort of going to school.

    I have been an Aid in the past, enjoyed it, but those days are done for me. While I have the ability to do some lifting, it's not what I envision for myself as primary duty for hours on end. If that were so, I would not bother to go on to school. You have your job description, and I will have mine. You certainly won't be filling out my reports or giving meds if I run behind helping you even if I have to work well beyond my shift, now will you? Then why expect BSNs or RNs to do your job and belittle them if they are not keen on it?

    I agree that we are both in this to give our utmost to our patients and in the end, the patients well being is what counts. I believe that will have more chance of happening if we each stick to our own jobs and do it the best we can. If I am tied up doing a Techs job, my extended trainning beyond that of a Tech won't be used as effectively it should be. I am sure you would feel the same if the shoe were on the other foot. : )


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